2017-2018 Online Continuing Education Programs 
    
    Jan 19, 2022  
2017-2018 Online Continuing Education Programs [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Online Continuing Education Undergraduate Programs


At NEC we acknowledge and are mindful of the real‐life obligations and special circumstances that adult learners face while still maintaining high standards and expectations. We strive to provide continuing education opportunities, with special emphasis on online environments, for students who decide that the flexibility of online learning best serves their academic and professional goals.

We strongly believe that the online environment can provide many opportunities for solid and meaningful interactions among students and faculty. To achieve this goal, our faculty provide frequent one‐on‐one interactions with each student each week. These interactions are substantial and consist of regular and frequent assignments that include ongoing feedback in order to let students know early in a course if they are doing well or need to improve. Our faculty and staff provide proactive outreach to the students. The continuing education programs at NEC are based on the principle that removing obstacles to professional and personal advancement are key components in creating an environment where students thrive.

Online Continuing Education Programs

General Education Requirements

Writing 1010 - Writing in the Liberal Arts and Sciences I

This course is an evidence-based, writing intensive course designed to improve critical thinking, reading, and writing proficiencies through guidance in a variety of academic formats. Students will develop strategies for turning their experiences, observations, and analyses into evidence suitable for academic writing. Over the length of this course students will build upon developing their critical thinking skills to learn the processes necessary for gathering and incorporating research material in their writing. Students will learn how to evaluate, cite, and document primary and secondary research sources, as well as how to develop arguments and support them with sound evidence. (4 credits)

Writing 1020 - Writing in the Liberal Arts and Sciences II

The goal of this course is to teach academic research as a tool for critical thinking that provides the basis for well developed arguments. This course requires synthesis, analysis, and application of information through writing in a variety of rhetorical forms for a variety of audiences. Students are asked to research and discuss a variety of social issues through the use of selected readings from modern essayists and the available library resources. This course is required of all students to meet institutional graduation requirements. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WR 1010.

LAS 1110 (LAS 1) On Being Human

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the meaning and purpose of an education rooted in the liberal arts and sciences by presenting the fundamental question that reverberates throughout the program’s curriculum, “What does it mean to be human?” LAS 1 seminars represent a variety of disciplines and topics related to the seminar theme. Regardless of instructor or disciplinary focus, each LAS 1 seminar prompts students to think about what it means to be human, individually and collectively. Students will consider what our shared obligations and responsibilities are as human beings, despite differences in race, class, gender, ethnicity, or other factors.

LAS 1111 (LAS 1) History of Political Thought

The History of Political Thought acquaints students with the fundamental questions about the political and social order and those thinkers who have posited the most significant answers to those questions. The course surveys past and present political thinking, focusing on current issues arising from a global market, transnational culture, and the appearance of new political movements that are giving voice to those who have long been marginalized or ignored. Students consider such topics as the perennial tension between individual and common goods, the challenges inherent to limited resources and human need, the sources of power and authority, and the strength and weaknesses of different forms of government. The course leaves students with an appreciation for the rights, duties, and obligations that are fundamental to a just society. (4 credits).

LAS 1112 (LAS 2) One Love:  Marley, Language and Love

The One Love course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental issues of the human condition through the careful study of a life that has had a lasting impact. Guided by Timothy White’s biographical masterpiece Catch a Fire, students consider the life, times, and artistry of Bob Marley, discovering within this narrative elements that are common to every human life: culture, family, race, ethnicity, faith, the love of beauty, and the challenge of achieving social justice. The One Love course serves as a foundation of the core curriculum by engaging students in the examination of the human experience. (4 credits).

LAS 1120 (LAS 2) Communities in America

This course grows out of the foundation provided in LAS 1110. LAS 2 seminars will address human nature in context. Students will ask, what constitutes community and how can diverse communities coexist in a pluralistic world? In addition, the seminar allows for consideration of the role of the ‘outsider’ or ‘other’ within communities and society as a whole. With a focus on American culture these seminars will explore how different communities can both succeed within and challenge the principles of democratic society.

From the meaning of social identity and difference to the significance of political, professional and religious affiliations, to the facts of disability, discrimination, and prejudice, these seminars will look at the social construction of difference and the challenges and opportunities of diversity.

LAS 2110 (LAS 3) The Creative Arts

LAS 3 covers the Creative Arts, exposing students to the innovative, imaginative side of human experience; these seminars are experientially based, promoting individual creativity, aesthetic awareness, and artistic appreciation. These courses embrace the process of conception, execution, and analysis. Students will leave having created and presented a portfolio of related works.

LAS 2120 (LAS 4) Social Sciences

The social sciences are concerned with relationships among individuals in, and to, a broader societal structure. Born of the Age of Enlightenment, the social sciences seek truth, through critical thinking and the use of scientific methodology, to gain a deeper understanding of the human experience. Social scientists in the disciplines of criminal justice, economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology strive to explain the human experience with the goal of improving the social condition.

LAS 2130 (LAS 5) Lab Science

The course that satisfies the Las 5 Lab Science requirement - ES1110 - covers a broad range of current environmental problems including population growth, global climate change, famine and food resources, global warming, and the loss of biodiversity. The laboratory portion of the course provides students with hands-on field and laboratory experiences that introduce a variety of methods and techniques used to examine natural communities and air and water quality.

LAS 2140 (LAS 6) Humanities

These courses develop the student’s ability to appreciate beauty and elegance in the search for truth and encourage the ability of the student to connect discrete fields of study by analyzing context and connections. Exposure to the interrelated nature in the fine arts, as well as the performing arts, literature, philosophy, art history, and history enhances the student’s understanding of our shared humanity as ethical and creative beings.

LAS 3110 (LAS 7) Global Perspectives

By addressing global issues that impact the human race and the biotic community of which we are a part, student awareness and critical skills will be heightened in the interest of finding answers to global challenges, and inspiring further inquiry. Ultimately, the purpose of LAS 7, in combination with all previously taken LAS seminars, is for students to engage multiple perspectives in their quest to understand and define what it means to be human, both individually and collectively, in order that they may demonstrate, in whatever field they pursue, an open‐minded, well‐informed critical, creative, and ethical perspective - one capable of transforming themselves and others for the greater good as they go on to become citizens of the world.

CT 1100 - Computer Technology

In this course, students explore how to use computers to become more productive in the way that they organize, think, and learn. Course topics include the Windows operating system, file directory structure, using the Internet, spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), and making computer presentations (Microsoft PowerPoint). (2 credits).

CW 1100 - Introduction to Creative Writing

This course is a writing workshop that exposes students to the various genres of creative writing such as poetry, fiction, non‐fiction and drama. This course satisfies the LAS 3 Creative Arts requirement. (4 credits)

ES 1110 - Environmental Science: A Global Concern

This course covers a broad range of current environmental problems including population growth, global climate change, famine and food resources, and the loss of biodiversity. The laboratory portion of this course provides students with hands-on, field and laboratory experiences that introduce a variety of methods and techniques for examining the natural environment. (4 credits).

Mathematics

Students will be expected to demonstrate competency in Mathematics. mathematics component of the General Education program is to develop students’ ability to reason quantitatively; to ensure a foundational understanding of the basic concepts and techniques necessary to be an informed consumer of quantitative information; to provide students with opportunities to intelligently evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of numerical evidence; and to provide students with strategies and methods for how to manipulate, understand, analyze, and interpret quantitative information and solve problems of a quantitative nature.

MT 1003- Fundamentals of Mathematics

This course is designed for students who need a review of arithmetic and basic algebra. Topics for this course include: operations using integers and rational numbers, decimals and percent, ratio and proportion, exponents, geometric formulas, variables, algebraic expressions, linear equations, solving equations and inequalities in one variable, and translating and solving applied problems. Students will actively engage in developing the important mathematical ideas through a series of real-life problem situations. This course counts toward graduation, but the course does not satisfy the College’s mathematics requirement. (4 credits).

MT 1020 - College Algebra

This course will focus on the application of algebra to real-world problems, including intermediate algebra topics such as solving linear equations and inequalities; solving quadratic equations; graphing linear, quadratic, and other polynomial functions, rational functions; factoring; and solving systems of equations. Emphasis will be on solving real-world problems by incorporating graphical, symbolic, and numeric representations. It is designed primarily for students who require and/or need additional preparation for statistics and Pre-Calculus. (4 credits).

MT 1100 - Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning

The goal of this course is to develop students’ ability to think critically about quantitative statements and information. In this course, students will have opportunities to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of numerical evidence and logical arguments, to apply mathematical methods in the context of real-world problems, and to study and employ strategies and methods for how to manipulate, understand, analyze, and interpret quantitative information. Students who do not need to take a higher level mathematics course should find this an interesting way of meeting the the college-wide mathematics graduation requirement. (4 credits).

Courses

English

Writing

General Education

Accounting

The Accounting program prepares the student for a variety of careers in accounting, with emphasis on the fundamental and advanced techniques needed to assist future clients and firms. Presenting numbers in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for profit, public and non‐profit organizations, accountants develop skills and expertise through problem solving and methodical strategies.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Accounting program should be able to:

  • Prepare and evaluate financial statements.
  • Understand the role of the accountant in the organization and in society.
  • Understand the impact of taxes on decision making and the statements.
  • Understand the importance of costing processes in an organization.
  • Understand and subscribe to the ethical code of conduct required by the accounting profession.
  • Understand and implement internal control mechanisms within an organization.
  • Remain accountable to the stakeholders of the organization for the accurate and fair presentation of the financial statements.
  • Be prepared to take the certification exams in accounting (CPA, CMA, CFP, CIA).
  • Use the experiential learning activities to enhance their capabilities in their future job experiences.
  • Understand the pronouncements as promulgated by the FASB, SEC, AICPA, etc. in facilitating corporate governance.

Programs

Major

Courses

Accounting

Business Administration


The Business Administration Program offers courses that will prepare students for a wide range of careers in for profit and not‐for‐profit organizations. The blending of business and liberal arts courses provides a strong foundation that enables students to develop the critical thinking skills essential for success in a rapidly‐changing global economy.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete the program will be able to:

  • Conduct themselves and their business to high ethical and professional standards
  • Write and communicate effectively work effectively in teams
  • Employ numerical analysis and accountancy in support of decision‐making and problem‐solving
  • Employ technology in pursuit of organizational objectives
  • Be familiar with terminology and principles associated with: the legal, social and international environments of business, organizational behavior, management, marketing, finance, strategy, finance, macroeconomics and microeconomics.

Programs

Major

Minor

Courses

Business Administration

Please note: specific courses offered in any academic year are subject to changes depending on enrollment and academic needs.

 

Computer Information Systems

Economics

Criminal Justice


The criminal justice major emphasizes a multidisciplinary and experiential approach to crime, justice, and the reduction of violence. It is a liberal arts major, requiring students to think critically, contemplate and appreciate alternative viewpoints, and communicate effectively. It encourages students to take both an analytical and experiential approach to criminal justice.

Students who complete the criminal justice program may go on to careers in law enforcement, corrections, social services, the justice system, or law. Regardless of student career track, the study of criminal justice provides a deeper understanding of crime and justice in contemporary American society.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Criminal Justice Program should be able to:

  • Articulate the purpose, structure, and function of the American criminal justice system.
  • Discuss the roles of law enforcement, the courts and the corrections system and compare the common values each shares with the competing goals of crime control and due process.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of terminology and fundamental constructs necessary for competence in the field.
  • Identify and evaluate basic theories of crime causation.
  • Explain how research in criminology can result in changes in social policy and legislation.
  • Identify the foundation of our system of laws and explain the philosophical underpinnings of criminal responsibility and punishment.
  • Recognize that crime is defined by, and is a reflection of, societal attitudes and tolerances.
  • Apply the concepts of justice, morality and ethics to law enforcement practice and the trial process.
  • Demonstrate analytical and problem solving skills in reading and writing about issues in law and criminal justice.
  • Articulate accepted standards of professional and ethical behavior.
  • Produce written material that demonstrates a proficiency in composition, grammar, and proper documentation.

Programs

Major

Minor

Courses

Criminal Justice

Healthcare Administration


The Healthcare Administration program integrates a framework of general education courses with a health care curriculum that provides the graduate with the foundational knowledge needed to enter today’s challenging and growing health industry, or to improve their skills and knowledge if already in the field.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the Healthcare Administration Program will be able to:

  • Understand current organizational theory and apply it to contemporary healthcare issues;
  • Identify leadership qualities unique to the healthcare professional and show how to apply them in supervisory and managerial situations;
  • Recognize current public and community health issues and their impact on healthcare leaders;
  • Understand contemporary financial management and economic issues in healthcare and recognize and apply analytical tools to relevant problems;
  • Demonstrate problem‐solving and communication skills by applying leadership concepts in an investigative research project.

Programs

Major

Minor

Courses

Healthcare Administration

Humanities


The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities provides a strong education in the liberal arts. Students acquire the writing, critical thinking, aesthetic, and analytical abilities required to pursue a graduate degree, or to advance in their career. The broad‐based humanities curriculum encourages them to think in the cross‐cultural and cross‐disciplinary way needed to succeed in today’s increasingly globalized and diverse business, cultural, and communication environments. The program’s content and structure is directly linked to NEC’s transformational mission and provides students ample opportunities to reflect on their natural and civic environments, cornerstones of the NEC Shared Commitments.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete the Humanities program at NEC should be able to:

  • Define the major concepts and theoretical perspectives of at least two humanities subjects
  • Show critical thinking ability
  • Discuss the historical development of at least two humanities subjects
  • Articulate logical arguments based on relevant information, using integrated data and insights from different disciplines, and evaluating information for its relevance and reliability
  • Analyze historical sources and evaluate the interpretative perspectives contained therein
  • Recognize the ways in which knowledge and the arts are socially constructed and sanctioned
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the methods and procedures of several humanities disciplines
  • Show an awareness of diverse forms of knowledge and ways of understanding the human situation.
  • Write clearly, structured, and well‐documented essays and reports.

Programs

Major

Courses

English

History

Humanities

Philosophy

Liberal Studies


The liberal arts program provides students with a wide‐ranging education that develops important critical and creative thinking skills that can be utilized in a vast number of occupations and academic programs. Students will develop these skills through the exploration of a number of disciplines including the sciences, humanities, mathematics and the creative arts. Through the study of the liberal arts students will also develop important understandings of personal integrity and community responsibility.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing a Liberal Arts degree at NEC will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basis of a liberal arts education: i.e. a recognition of the inter‐relationships between the arts/humanities, social sciences and natural sciences;
  • Apply critical thinking and creative thinking skills;
  • Perform quantitative skills;
  • Apply information literacy skills;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of what it means to be human and how humans interact in societies, both locally and globally;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence between humans and the natural World;
  • Apply the writing process in the context of a sound rhetorical and disciplined approach in order to develop competency as effective writers.

Programs

Major

Courses

Art: Fine and Media Art

English

Political Sciences

Psychology


Psychology emphasizes the fundamental importance of understanding human behavior and thought. It is a wide‐ranging discipline, encompassing diverse fields of study. It is also, by its history and nature, an applied discipline. Students focus on such diverse topics as human development, prejudice, aggression, Abnormal Psychology/Psychopathology, health, and social interaction, not solely to acquire knowledge, but also with the intent of using this knowledge to better their community and their world.

At New England College, it is the goal of the faculty to merge practical skills with theoretical content and critical thinking abilities. One aim of the program is to prepare students for continued study at the graduate level. Another goal is to prepare students for careers in counseling and human services, business, education, community health, and political and social service. A psychology major provides students with a variety of career options upon graduation. In all courses, students are challenged to move beyond their common sense and personal history and to acquire an understanding of how questions about human functioning are answered through systematic investigation and hypothesis testing. Moreover, the faculty make psychology meaningful and relevant to students so that what they learn can be applied to real life skills such as parenting, interpersonal relationships, health, conflict resolution, motivational and emotional difficulties, and personal development.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Psychology Program should possess the following:

  • Knowledge Base of Psychology ‐ Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
  • Research Methods in Psychology ‐ Understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.
  • Critical Thinking Skills in Psychology ‐ Respect and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes.
  • Application of Psychology ‐ Understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.
  • Values in Psychology ‐ Value empirical evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a science.
  • Information and Technological Literacy ‐ Demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers and other technology for many purposes.
  • Communication Skills ‐ Communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
  • Multicultural Awareness ‐ Recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of multicultural communities.
  • Personal Development ‐ Develop insight into their own and other’s behavior and mental processes and apply effective strategies for self-management and self‐improvement.
  • Career Planning and Development ‐ Pursue realistic ideas about how to implement their psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.

Programs

Major

Minor

Courses

Psychology

Social Sciences


The social science major provides breadth of knowledge in the social sciences through interdisciplinary study in areas such as criminal justice, healthcare, psychology, and sociology. It also offers depth and focus through selection of core courses in one social science area. Graduates in social science may pursue a variety of careers in which understanding of social science issues is important, including business administration, elder care, government, health services, law enforcement, human resources, and community service.

Learning Outcomes

The student who graduates with a major in social science should be able to:

  • Integrate theoretical perspectives and research findings in the social sciences, using quantitative and qualitative data and applying social science research methods.
  • Communicate effectively to professional and nonprofessional audiences.
  • Analyze complex social problems and work towards realistic solutions using awareness, acceptance, and appreciation of diversity, social factors, and global multicultural perspectives.
  • Apply critical and creative thinking and information literacy to solve practical problems in the social sciences.

Programs

Major

Sociology


The Sociology Program focuses on the themes of social change and social justice. It is designed to equip students with a broad knowledge of social issues and with the analytical and practical skills needed to pursue graduate study and careers in fields such as social work, community development, criminal justice, and peace and justice activism.

Learning Outcomes

  • Understand contemporary domestic and global social problems, the ways they affect people’s lives, and the role individuals and organizations play in the change process on a micro and macro level.
  • Identify basic methodological approaches and describe the general role of methods in building sociological knowledge.
  • Describe how sociology differs from and is similar to other social sciences and give examples of these differences and similarities.
  • The internal diversity of U.S. society and the significance of variations by race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, age.
  • Show how patterns of thought and knowledge are directly influenced by political-economic social structures.
  • Present opposing viewpoints and alternative hypotheses on various issues.

Programs

Major

Courses

Sociology

Human Services

The Human Services program prepares students for a variety of careers in Advocacy, Mental Health, Social Services, Health and Human Services, Criminal Justice and Community Support, with an emphasis on helping other, and making a significant impact on individuals, families and neighborhoods.  Human service professionals work for nonprofit and for-profit social service agencies and state and local governments - in positions that involve planning, supervision and research. They also assist those who need a helping hand to meet basic needs or enjoy a higher quality of life, including the developmentally disabled, the elderly, immigrants and refugees, substance abusers and crime victims and offenders. Experts in this field weave together a vast array of community resources, specialized assistance and natural supports to help those in need navigate life’s challenges.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete the Human Services program at NEC should be able to:

  • Explore the forces that promote unity; theories and concepts related to prejudice and discrimination; and strategies to reduce conflict and promote respect and understanding among diverse populations
  • Understand how to apply statistics to answer questions in social science, and learn how to analyze the results
  • Examine the research strategies used by psychologists and social scientists
  • Identify the effects of substance abuse, various types of addiction, the medical and mental health conditions that may coexist with addiction and substance abuse treatment processes and interventions
  • Develop skills in case management, evaluating crisis situations and individual and family assessment
  • Acquire interpersonal communications skills to increase effectiveness in client relationships
  • Analyze social, political and economic forces affecting welfare and social service systems

Programs

Major

Communication

Program Description:

Communication Studies examines the ways in which social meanings are produced through the creation, mediation, and reception of messages. Students may focus in Media Studies, Journalism, or Public Relations and Advertising, or choose their own set of elective courses for a general Communication major. This major offers both practical training in the use of media technologies and communication strategies, as well as critical and historical perspectives on media and communication.

Learning Objectives:

Students who complete the Communication program should be able to:

  • Implement effective writing skills for multimedia settings;

  • Demonstrate strong interpersonal relationships and negotiation skills;

  • Show critical thinking skills, by way of their written communication style;

  • Carry out timely and relevant research on a wide array of topics, to inform writing and editing for printed and digital media;

  • Undertake successfully any projects that require digital media literacy.

Careers:

The ability to write well in professional settings is an asset that company leaders often struggle to find. Increasingly, employers are finding out that good communication can be crucial for the success of the organization and its longer term image as well as health. The range of careers is as varied as there is diversity in the types of companies and enterprises that populate the internet at a rapid pace. Students who graduate with a Communication major can choose to pursue many career paths, in all kinds of industries. Positions run the gamut from entry-level associates in social media or public relations, sales positions, or content developers, to executive positons including Vice President for Public Relation & Corporate Communication or Account Director.  Students who choose one of the three optional concentrations in Journalism, Media Studies, or Public Relations & Advertising will have increased opportunities for positions that are directed related to these fields.

Programs

Major

Courses

Communication

Fire Science Administration

Program Overview

The B.A. in Fire Science Administration is designed for the student who had an interest in firefighting administration. This program when combined with Firefighting I and Firefighting II, courses taught at state fire academies, allow the student to progress in the field of firefighting. Individuals can be employed as professional firefighters, but are limited in their ability to advance within this field without a Bachelor’s degree. The program is aligned with the National Fire Academy FESHE Model Curriculum for a bachelor’s program.  NEC has offered firefighting management as an IDM in recent years. This major aligns with our core competencies in the area of management by focusing on the administrative and managerial related to firefighting.

Program Goals

  • Develop strong written, oral and numeracy skills.
  • Develop and Demonstrate critical thinking, leadership skills and ethical decision making.
  • Understand the history and theories driving modern fire prevention, mitigation, and suppression.
  • Develop this management skills and knowledge to lead organizations though complex personnel issues.
  • Understand and utilize management and leadership techniques and theories so as to be able to make a difference at your organization, to be an effective leader.
  • Understand the dynamic legal and social environment that affects fire and emergency services
  • Understand the administrative dynamics involved in managing fire and emergency departments in context of emergency situations and in the context of overall municipal goals.

Programs

Major

Courses

Fire Science

Philosophy

Courses

Philosophy

International Relations and Diplomacy

Program Outcomes

The New England College Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy (BAIRD) program prepares students for opportunities in both the public and private sector for positions in and out of government, particularly in foreign policy, think tanks, or in any industry that an in-depth knowledge of the foreign policy process is desired. Students who successfully complete the BAIRD program are also well prepared for graduate level work. 

 

The BAIRD curriculum consists of 44 credits in addition to general education requirements, and focuses on the intersection between theory, policy and politics by taking advantage of faculty who are scholar practitioners in the world of foreign policy and diplomacy.

 

BAIRD students will gain an understanding of the intellectual foundations for key foreign policy discussions and how the outcomes affect and are changed by the political process. They will develop analytical and advocacy skills and will be prepared to enter or continue careers in the public, private, and non-profit foreign policy and national security sectors.

 

Our graduates are prepared to begin careers and make a difference in the realm of foreign policy, national security, and related fields. The program builds and integrates the student’s intellectual interest and experience, small group dialogue, and interaction with theoreticians and practitioners in the field. The value of this experience, opportunity to network and apply knowledge developed through asynchronous interaction in the online classroom, all while earning academic credit, is at the heart of this degree program.

 

Graduates from the BAIRD should be able to:

  • Collect, synthesize, and analyze information to better understand historical and contemporary issues in international relations and diplomacy; 
  • Contribute to teams working on foreign policy research and formulation;
  • Apply negotiation tools to collaboratively reach consensus and identification of common objectives in diverse populations with diverging interests;
  • Become familiar with the key governmental and non-governmental institutions that formulate and implement foreign policy;
  • Articulate the nuances of national level politics, and how they influence the formulation and implementation of public policy and diplomacy;
  • Provide alternative theoretical perspectives to the analysis of international relations and diplomacy;
  • Obtain direct experience in the field, working for a policy organization/shop or an institution of foreign policy, diplomacy, or national security;
  • Carry out applied research to support writing and communicating effectively in the international relations and diplomacy realms.

Programs

Major

Courses

Political Sciences