2019-2020 Residential Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Aug 07, 2022  
2019-2020 Residential Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Institute of Art and Design Courses


Institute of Art

Art Education (IA)

Courses

  •  

    AED 210 - Teaching Art


    Visual Arts in public education is examined through theory and practice in this introductory and multifaceted course. Students will explore the role, purpose and practice of fine arts in public education through academic study and clinical experiences in schools. Educational trends, laws and philosophies throughout American history, such as John Deweys Lab schools to No Child Left Behind, will serve as a springboard for evaluating clinical experiences. Students will be introduced to lesson planning and facilitation, state and national standards, assessment, classroom management, and a written philosophy of Art Education. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 601 - Creativity and the Brain


    This course examines the role of art instruction in human development and its relationship to brain functions. The task of the brain, in addition to monitoring biological functions, is to interpret all human experiences, to make sense of our existence and the world in which we live. How it does so is the embodiment of the creative process. By encouraging, engaging and teaching creativity, we invariably enhance the brains ability to do its job. Students will utilize and reflect upon creative experiences in their own studios, making this coursework personally relevant and influential in ones artwork and teaching. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 602 - Contemporary Issues in Art Education


    Students will research historical and contemporary theories and trends in society, education, and art education. Students will consider application of this knowledge to their own philosophy and teaching. Use of a wide variety of sources will facilitate students in exploring a topic of interest in depth so that they might present it to their fellow graduate students, providing a rich understanding of many historical and contemporary studies for all students. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 603 - Technology, Curriculum, and Assessment


    Students will explore contemporary techniques for curriculum planning and measurement for all levels K-8 and 9-12. This course will rely on developmental processes as they relate to instruction and curriculum planning, such as scope and sequence. It will address individual, cultural, and community needs of students and will culminate in a project-based writing piece focusing on developing curriculum and program assessment. A strong emphasis will be placed on utilizing technology within the curriculum and for assessment practice to engage students and broaden visual learning for the 21 century graduate student. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 604 - Digital Methodologies


    Teachers will learn how various forms of social media and simple technologies can be used to facilitate and accelerate learning. An analysis of contemporary artists working in digital media, art educators implementing digital strategies and related pedagogy will provide educators with a spectrum of approaches and techniques for utilizing digital methodologies in their classrooms. Students will gain experience by implementing some of these strategies through lesson and unit development. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 607 - Psych of Educational Development & Learning


    This course will examine the impact of typical and atypical development of children from infancy through their school-aged years on their learning process and ability to meet academic demands place on them, and conversely explores the role of academic demands on facilitating developmental processes. Such areas as gross and fine motor capacity, attention, memory, emotional and sensory regulation, motivation, attachment needs and behavior will be examined as factors that both contribute to learning processes and are impacted by them. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 608 - The Exceptional Learner


    This unique course is designed to first challenge the students in defining exceptionality, normalcy, and individual differences, and simultaneously present our understanding of these concepts in historical, sociological, cultural, psychological, legal and educational contexts. Students will learn about learning differences, in terms of style and conditions that present unique challenges in the educational arena. Specifically, they will gather information about various educational disability conditions, how they are assessed, addressed, and dealt with in our public schools. They will learn about the laws governing these educational processes, and begin to understand how individual educational plans are developed and implemented. Fieldwork: This course requires 20 hours of structured visits to schools that work with individuals with disabilities. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 609 - Elementary & Secondary Methodologies


    This course will examine both developmental levels of fine art education methods. Best practices of teaching art content including policy and safety, materials and budget, competency-based instruction that meets National Core Arts Standards, differentiation, and assessment are some of the content areas to be studied and developed. There are 50 hours of fieldwork required for this course which will be used in clinical analysis, planning, instruction, assessment, and . A total of 90 early fieldwork hours will be completed for this course. The hours are divided between elementary and secondary. It is highly recommended that fieldwork and assignments be complete before the course begins. Students are encouraged to complete some fieldwork hours at our SEPIA (Student Enrichment Program in the Arts) Lab School. Arrangement of fieldwork hours must be approved by the MAAE certification officer. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 610 - Research and Professional Identity


    Candidate will research and complete the NH TCAP Teacher Common Assessment of Performance Portfolio and the Professional Art Educator Portfolio while completing the final culminating placement. The TCAP serves as the students thesis. It is a common assessment all aspiring educators in New Hampshire must complete and pass to be recommended for certification. This final, academic study will directly influence the writing of ones educational philosophy and portfolio of professional work. This course will meet every other week on campus or virtually. (3 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 701 - Elementary Culminating Fieldwork


    Students must be able to devote all work week hours to this endeavor and supplemental employment is strongly discouraged. Student teachers should anticipate working in an elementary school with a mentor teacher. They must also keep in mind that their semester will begin in accordance to their first day of student teaching. This is a continuous, semester-long experience where students gradually assume responsibility of a range of visual art classes in grades K-5, thereby demonstrating the appropriate professional skills and attitudes essential for successful teaching of diverse populations of students. Student teaching is conducted under the supervisory guidance of school mentors and members of the Art Education clinical faculty. The Active Pedagogy seminar will meet once every other week at the Institute. This seminar complements field work and is required. Students will add culminating fieldwork and finalize their digital portfolio as part of their final authentic assessment. Prerequisite(s): minimum 3.4 cumulative GPA; completion of program requirements for Art Education and application approval by the Art Education Director. (6 Credits)
  •  

    MAE 702 - Secondary Culminating Fieldwork


    Students must be able to devote all work week hours to this endeavor and supplemental employment is strongly discouraged. Student teachers should anticipate working in a secondary school with a mentor teacher. They must also keep in mind that their semester will begin in accordance to their first day of student teaching. This is a continuous, semester-long experience where students gradually assume responsibility of a range of visual art classes in grades 9-12, thereby demonstrating the appropriate professional skills and attitudes essential for successful teaching of diverse populations of students. Student teaching is conducted under the supervisory guidance of school mentors and members of the Art Education clinical faculty. The Active Pedagogy seminar will meet once every other week at the Institute. This seminar complements field work and is required. Students will add culminating fieldwork and finalize their digital portfolio as part of their final authentic assessment. Prerequisite(s): minimum 3.4 cumulative GPA; completion of program requirements for Art Education and application approval by the Art Education Director. (6 Credits)
  • Art History (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    AHT 210 - Global Perspectives in Visual Art


    This course will introduce how the visual arts express the beliefs, values, philosophies, and politics of diverse cultures past and present. Students will explore the meaning, purposes, and historical contexts of art and architecture in Western and Non-Western societies, including those of Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Students practice visual analysis in front of actual artworks in museums, and visit local architectural monuments. Topics will also include the role of the artist in society, as well as the relationship between artists and patrons. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 301 - Modern Art


    This course surveys the major developments in the visual arts from the 1870s through the 1960s, with an emphasis on the early 20th century. Students will explore the origins and development of modernism and the foundations for contemporary artistic practice. We will place works of art and artists careers within historical contexts, analyzing how artists sought to create works relevant to a rapidly changing society. Critical issues will be examined in class through assigned readings, presentations, discussion, art-historical research and writing, and field trips to area museums. Prerequisite: AHT210 (3 Credits )
  •  

    AHT 305 - History of Illustration


    This course examines the history of illustration with an emphasis on American influences, from its origins, through the golden age, to the present. We will explore each eras illustrators and their work, and evaluate how history of illustration is both intertwined with and separate from that of the fine arts. We will therefore study the genre as individual and cultural expression, but will also assess the influence of technology, commerce, and other historical transformations on culture and the arts. Students of this course explore how public perceptions of illustration and illustrators have changed, as we grapple with the innovations and controversies associated with the field. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 307 - History of Photography


    This course provides a firm understanding of the history of photography with an emphasis on the leading artists and innovators in the medium. Working chronologically, the course covers the European inventors of photography in the 19th century, through the innovations of pictorialist and modernist photographic styles, to contemporary American, Asian, and European artists. The course explores technical and aesthetic developments in the medium, including historical movements and genres. Prerequisite: AHT210 (3 Credits )
  •  

    AHT 308 - History of Graphic Design


    Graphic design has great power and has both reflected and influenced our society and culture throughout history. This course identifies the key movements within the history of graphic design from the Graphic Renaissance through today and highlights how these movements have mirrored and changed the course of our society and the fields of graphic design. Lectures, images and texts will be used in the exploration of each of the following periods: Graphic Renaissance, The Industrial Revolution, Mid-Century Modernism, Late-Modernism, Post-Modernism and the Digital Age. Prerequisite: AHT210 (3 Credits )
  •  

    AHT 309 - Survey of Asian Art


    This course surveys the art and architecture of India, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia, from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century. We will examine representative works from major periods, including ritual bronzes, frescoes, Hindu sculpture and temples, Buddhist images, shrines, ink scrolls, calligraphy, decorative screens, arts of Zen, and ceramics. Social, political, and religious context will be emphasized in addition to analysis of style and technique. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 311 - Renaissance and Baroque Art


    The artists of the Renaissance and Baroque eras produced some of the most famous art in the Western tradition. Too often, however, these works are viewed in isolation as the products of individual artists, or displayed in museums as isolated specimens of a particular medium. In this course, we will explore developments in European painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 14th to the 17th centuries, considering works of art contextually, as social artifacts and products of a particular place and time. Course readings cover a wide variety of perspectives, from primary sources and early histories to the most recent critical studies of Renaissance and Baroque art and culture. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 317 - Photography Across Cultures


    Photography is ubiquitous in our culture, appearing in numerous forms and guises. This course will examine photographic history from the 1970s to the current day, looking at photographys multiplicity as fine art, press, fashion and commercial venture. From documentary and documents of performances to the highly constructed imagery utilized by contemporary artists, students explore diverse subjects, styles, and methods that cover portrait, object, city, memory, appropriation, landscape, and narrative. The course provides global perspectives on photographic practices, emphasizing the cultural diversity and plurality of the medium. In discussions on theory and criticism, students will have the opportunity to raise questions about their own concerns, and utilize their own experiences as cultural producers to better understand the current state of digital photographic production. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 318 - Arts of Africa and the Pacific


    This course will introduce the rich, diverse artistic traditions of Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Easter Island, Tonga, Solomon Islands, Samoa, Fiji, and Hawaii. We will explore how arts in various media serve as markers of identity that communicate gender, age, beauty, power, status, wealth, leadership, and social control. Art was often not intended for display, but to be used and to be viewed in motion, as in multi-media masquerades and rituals. Masks, ceramics, architecture, textiles, and body arts all play significant roles in daily life, and express cultural philosophies, hierarchies, and spiritualities. Museum visits will provide opportunities to experience works first-hand, as we consider aesthetic qualities, as well as meaning and context. Students will broaden their contextual knowledge by participating in cultural exchanges with local communities associated with African and Pacific cultures. AHT210 (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 319 - Art and World Mythology


    Myths are traditional stories that have played vital roles in many cultures through the ages. They describe the origins of humanity, they tell stories of great heroes and gods, they explain how the world works, they teach lessons, and they reveal truths about our nature. An integral part of daily life, mythological narratives were expressed in civic and private monuments. This course will explore how myths are represented in the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome, Mesopotamia, Native North America, Asia, and Europe. By tracing these mythic traditions from antiquity to contemporary culture, students will discover how and why myths and their meanings change over time. Students will have the opportunity to create their own mythology-inspired works in the media of their choice, gaining a deeper understanding of the significance of these tales in modern society. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 320 - Islamic Art and Architecture


    This course will explore a wide range of art forms and objects associated with Muslim culture and produced from the seventh to the twenty-first centuries on a large geographical area stretching from Spain in Europe to India, and Southeast Asia. Students will learn how to view, analyze and write about Islamic architecture, decorative arts, and the arts of the book. They will also interpret Islamic art objects in a broader and changing context of the politics, social reforms, and cultural traditions of the lands on which Islam developed, as well as in the larger framework of global cultural exchanges of the time. Finally, this course will discuss Islamic art and architecture with all its complexities and variations found in regional styles. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 321 - Global History of Textiles


    Textiles provide a vast visual resource to explore the history and cultures of the globe. Textiles create beauty, express identity and status, display power, tell stories, and strengthen community through the representation of shared values; they provide insights into a societys economics, class structure, and spiritual traditions. Additionally, they serve as inspiration to many visual artists, including sculptors, designers, and printmakers. In this course, we will examine the basic techniques of textile production (weaving, dying, and needle arts, among others), and study the riches of textiles from Africa, Asia, Oceania, the Americas, and Europe. Our home base in Manchester plays an important role in the great textile-producing traditions of New England; we will visit the Currier Museum and Manchester Historic Association to view first-hand examples, as well as create textile projects as part of our study. (3 Credits )
  •  

    AHT 322 - History of Comics


    Within the historic context of American culture, students will study the evolution of the picture narrative. The focus will be on knowledge and active application of visual comic art forms: comic panels, editorial cartoons, comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels. This course will survey the rise of popular form, and its influences, i.e: Ben Franklin’s editorial drawings, Thomas Nast’s Teapot Dome editorial cartoons, the standard “work for hire” comic book contracts that left creators uncompensated, the Superman/Captain Marvel court case, the HUAC investigation into the comic book’s role in inciting juvenile delinquency, the rise of the underground comic revolution, and the graphic novel explosion. Industry professionals will visit the class to discuss their creative journeys and their cartooning careers. AHT210 (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 401 - Contemporary Art Since 1945


    This course is an in-depth, exploration of theory and practice in the visual arts from the aftermath of World War II to the present. Issues discussed include the legacy of modernism, the exploration of media and subject matter, and the relationship between art and society. Media covered include painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking, architecture, and design, along with performance, film and video, and conceptual art. An emphasis will be placed on analysis and discussion of artistic theory and critical writings. (3 Credits )
  •  

    AHT 412 - Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Realism


    This course concentrates on European art from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th century. At the heart of the course is the paradoxical relationship of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Realism - seemingly oppositional movements that were, nevertheless, profoundly echoic. From the aesthetic vision of Napoleons empire to the revolutionary vision of Delacroix and Daumiers politically impassioned prints, students will consider, among other things, how closely the art and politics of the age were intertwined, and to what extent the tools of propaganda may be wielded by the hands of artists. (3 Credits)
  •  

    AHT 420 - French Prints and Caricature


    The nineteenth-century media explosion resulted from a complex web of circumstances, including the invention of lithography, the development of a new urban culture, and the violently shifting political climates during the “Age of Revolution”. The Romantic movement in art and literature valued individual expression and human rights, giving rise to political caricature and the illustrated satirical press. The French public love seeing themselves, and avidly consumed mass-produced lithographs depicting their entertainments, flirtations, and daily occupations. The course will explore the style and subject matter of popular prints, caricatures, and illustrations by Daumier, Travies, Granville, Monnier, Pigal, Philipon, Gavarni, Boilly, and Deveria, among others. We will also examine the work of avant-garde artists who fell under the spell of printmaking processes. Gericault and Delacroix practiced lithography, producing works in tones ranging from silvery gray to velvety black. Theodore Rousseau, Corot, Manet, Degas, Many Cassatt, Fantib-Latour and Marie Braquemond experimented with various graphic media, including etching and aquatint, creating prints that were appreciated by collectors as complete (and affordable) artistic statements. AHT210 (3 Credits)
  • Comic Arts (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    CAR 101 - Fundamentals of Comics


    This course emphasizes the hybrid nature of the medium of comics and the process of cartooning, its potential as a medium for self-expression, the nature of drawing as it relates to cartooning and its function to visual and written narrative and story. Students will participate in lectures, in-class activities, studio work and written assignments that are intended to develop their skill and understanding of the comics media (tools) form and theory. Over the course of the semester, the students will demonstrate their ability to draw expressively, use various media related to comics, and an understanding of design elements by focusing on formal elements of art as they relate to comics. The student will, at the end of the course, present a portfolio of their guided in class and homework assignments and written work that demonstrates basic cartooning (naturalistic and expressive), layout (composition and design), and narrative techniques. In this course the student will develop a rudimentary understanding of comic art theory, visual narrative and characters developed from prompts, notes, sketches, and class discussion. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CAR 201 - Fundamentals of Comic Arts II


    Fundamentals of Comics II continues emphasizing the hybrid nature of the medium of comics and the process of cartooning, its potential as medium for self-expression, the nature of drawing as it relates to cartooning and it’s function to visual and written narrative and story. The student will participate in lectures, in-class activities, studio work and written assignments that are intended to develop their skill and understanding of the comic media (tools) form and theory. Over the course of the semester, the students will further demonstrate their ability to use comics as a form of storytelling by creating a series of guided short comic stories (21-30 pages). In Fundamentals of Comics, I student mostly focused on the tools, techniques and some theory that make comics and cartooning possible. In FC II students will continue to work on expressive drawing, composition, and design with comics will beginning to use and investigate style in comics and how it helps to tell a story. Students, at the end of the course, will present a portfolio of their guided in-class and homework assignments and written work that demonstrates intermediate cartooning (naturalistic and expressive), layout (composition and design), narrative techniques with a particular focus on how stylistic narrative effects the storytelling process. CAR101 (3 Credits)
  •  

    CAR 301 - Advanced Comic Arts


    Advanced Comicsfocuses on utilizing style, theory and practice learned in Fundamentals of Comics to practice advanced processes in cartooning and comics with a primary focus on visual narrative, story, plot, character, symbolism, visual metaphor and other visual storytelling techniques. The student will participate in lectures, in-class activities, studio work and written assignments that are intended to challenge their skills and understanding of the comic media (tools) form and theory.Students will use their total collected understanding of the medium of comics to propose an original work (45-60 pages) and develop the comic over the course of the semester.Students, at the end of the course, will present a portfolio of their and their completed project with process, planning and story outline. CAR201 (3 Credits)
  •  

    CAR 310 - Internship/Com Based Project


    Internship/Com Based Project (3 Credits)
  •  

    CAR 320 - Immersion/Millennial Press


    See syllabus for course description (3 Credits)
  •  

    CAR 350 - Storyboarding & Character Development


    See syllabus for course description (3 Credits)
  •  

    CAR 399/499 - Comic Arts Special Topics


    Comic Arts Special Topics (3 Credits)
  •  

    CAR 401 - Comic Arts Senior Studio I


    Comic Arts Senior Studio I and II serves as a pair of capstone courses. In the Making semester, students will plan, propose, and complete a 100-page comic, series or work sequential work. Students ability to use comics theory, media and practices will be evaluated by and in conjunction with peers, faculty and outside reviewers. The course will include directed lectures and critiques to support the process of becoming a professional comic artist or cartoonist. Students will be expected to do directed writing toward support and completion of a Capstone Paper that is a critical evaluation and response to their personal exploration. Attendance at lectures and presentations by visiting artists will be mandatory. In the Publishing Semester, students will work toward finishing their work and finding a means of publication digitally or via traditional or self-publishing. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CAR 403 - Comic Arts Senior Studio II


    Comic Arts Senior Studio I and II serves as a pair of capstone courses. In the Making semester, students will plan, propose, and complete a 100-page comic, series or work sequential work. Students ability to use comics theory, media and practices will be evaluated by and in conjunction with peers, faculty and outside reviewers. The course will include directed lectures and critiques to support the process of becoming a professional comic artist or cartoonist. Students will be expected to do directed writing toward support and completion of a Capstone Paper that is a critical evaluation and response to their personal exploration. Attendance at lectures and presentations by visiting artists will be mandatory. In the Publishing Semester, students will work toward finishing their work and finding a means of publication digitally or via traditional or self-publishing. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CER 310 - Internship/Practicum


    Internship/Practicum (3 Credits)
  • Ceramics (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    CER 101 - Exploring Ceramics


    For Non-Ceramic majors, Art Education students or Elective Credit: In this introduction to ceramics students will not only learn the basic techniques of handbuilding and wheel work, but will also begin to develop a design vocabulary and critical thinking skills that can encompass all their studio work. Formal, historical, and conceptual ideas along with glazing and firing will be introduced as students respond to creative challenges as they develop a personal aesthetic. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CER 111 - Introduction to Wheelworking


    Students will learn to control clay on the potters wheel from basic to complex forms. As students expand their technique, they will also begin to develop vocabulary that will inform all of their studio work. Formal and conceptual ideas will be introduced as students broaden their familiarity with historical and contemporary work, allowing them to begin developing a process of critique and personal aesthetic. Glazing and firing will also be introduced and incorporated into the evolution of the creative process. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 113 - Introduction to Handbuilding


    Handforming techniques with clay have been used to express creative ideas for thousands of years. Through the construction techniques of slab building, coiling, pinching, and modeling, students will continue to explore these traditions through the use of formal design elements to develop related forms and appropriate surfaces. From drawing on personal experiences as well as thoughtful assignments, creative ideas can become a reality. Offered spring semester. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 207 - Clay and Glaze Materials


    Understanding the geological formation of clays and the basic chemistry behind glaze formation will give students the foundation to go confidently into independent exploration of their materials. Basic math skills will be used to determine empirical formulas in clay and glaze materials. The focus on these elements will help the students tie the science of ceramics to the art of creating with clay. Offered spring semester. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CER 213 - Intermediate Handbuilding


    This is a continuation of Introduction to Handbuilding. Scale and concept will be explored in more advanced ways and students refine their creative vision. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 314 - Intermediate Wheelworking


    Strengthening throwing techniques while addressing issues of style and artistic development, students will use the skills they developed in CER111 Introduction to Wheelworking to further enhance their personal styles. Working either sculpturally or traditionally, thrown work will be the primary focus of a body of work developed throughout the semester. Prerequisite: CER111 (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 321 - Exploring the Qualities of Porcelain


    Explore the extraordinary qualities of porcelain through guided exercises with this exquisite material. Qualities such as translucency , whiteness and more will impact your design choices and push you to new creative places. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CER 325 - Exploring Earthenware I


    This intermediate level course will provide a basic knowledge of low fire clay, surface techniques, glazing and firing in an electric kiln. A variety of forming and surface techniques will be utilized through assignments designed to introduce the student to a broad spectrum of low fire possibilities. Students will be expected to solve problems drawing on their previous experience and building on the development of their personal aesthetic. Students will be expected to work independently as well as in small groups. Instruction will include lecture and demonstration, historic references, images, student presentations and hands on experience. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 326 - Exploring Earthenware II


    This intermediate level course will provide a basic knowledge of low fire clay, surface techniques, glazing and firing in an electric kiln. A variety of forming and surface techniques will be utilized through assignments designed to introduce the student to a broad spectrum of low fire possibilities. Students will be expected to solve problems drawing on their previous experience and building on the development of their personal aesthetic. Students will be expected to work independently as well as in small groups. Instruction will include lecture and demonstration, historic references, images, student presentations and hands on experience. There will be additional requirements determined by the faculty (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 350 - Concept and Design for Portfolio


    In this course, the student is challenged to create specific, personal responses to general themes, using handbuilding and wheelthrowing techniques as appropriate. Students will focus on how their process of working in series develops into creating a thoughtful and cohesive body of work that is documented as personal portfolio. This is an opportunity to further refine technical skills to explore a personal methodology of integrating interests, inspiration, and creating a more directed point of view into the creative process of experimentation, sketching, editing, and re-drafting. Offered spring semester. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 400 - Kilns: Firing


    This course offers hands-on experience in managing firing schedules, as well as loading, firing and unloading of electric and fuel burning kilns. Through structured instruction and guidance, students will work collaboratively to develop the skills to take part in all aspects of firing Ceramics Department studio work for the semester. Students will become familiar with theory and practice of firing electric, atmospheric and gas-fired kilns through hands on experience. Kiln and firing theory will be discussed and assessed through the experience of different firing processes. Must be taken with CER402 (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 401 - Senior Studio: Portfolio


    Senior Studio serves as a pair of capstone courses. In the Portfolio semester, students will develop a full professional portfolio that will culminate a small body of work suitable for digital portfolio documentation. Students will be expected to develop a working plan in conjunction with the faculty member that includes setting and meeting ongoing artistic goals and demonstrating the ability to work independently to solve creative problems. Students ability to think critically about their own work and to accept and solve challenges that are presented will be expected. The course will include directed lectures and critiques to support the critical awareness necessary for becoming an accomplished professional artist. Students will be expected to do directed writing toward support and completion of a Capstone Paper that is a critical evaluation and response their personal exploration. Attendance at lectures and presentations by visiting artists will be mandatory. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 402 - Kilns: Design and Build I


    This course must be taken with CER400. This course will cover the materials, design, construction, and operational theories of fuel burning and electric kilns. Classroom lecture and discussion will explore the use of appropriate materials, health and safety issues, design, construction, and operation theory of kilns. Students will work collaboratively through the hands-on component of this class involving kiln construction that may require some weekend attendance. Offered alternative years in the fall semester. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CER 403 - Senior Studio: Exhibition


    Senior Studio serves as a pair of capstone courses. In Exhibition as a counterpart to Portfolio, students will continue to explore their creative voice to develop an extended body of work suitable for exhibition based on the work of the first semester. In preparation for exhibition Artist Statements will be developed specific to exhibition work, and working with the faculty and Gallery Director to create work suitable for installation will be expected. Students will be expected to do directed writing toward support and completion of a Capstone Paper that is a critical evaluation and response their personal exploration. Attendance at lectures and presentations by visiting artists will be mandatory. (3 Credits )
  • Creative Writing (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    CRW 101 - Intro to Fiction


    This foundation course in creative writing introduces students to the craft of fiction writing, with focus on narrative structure, the revelation of character through dialogue, action and setting, and the concepts of conflict and point-of-view. Students will begin by reading and analyzing short fiction to discuss how it works, engage in short exercises, and then move on to critique longer works by class members. This serves as a vital introduction to the writing workshop process. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CRW 102 - Intro to Poetry


    This course serves as an introduction to the craft of poetry. Students will read and analyze a broad selection of poets and will be assigned exercises to teach the relationship between form and content. Poetic form (such as sonnet and ballad), rhyme, and meter will also be introduced. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 205 - Reading as a Writer


    A good writer is first a good reader. Furthermore, as Vladimir Nabokov said, A good reader, a major reader, an active and creative reader, is a re-reader. Through close readings of stories, novels, poems, and memoir, students will study how a literary work works to make meaning through form, style and voice. Students will keep a reading journal and be evaluated on the basis of the journal and class participation. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CRW 209 - Personal Narrative


    Which is more trustworthy: biography or autobiography? Aside from the hard facts of time and place of birth, how the story of a life takes shape has as much to do with the author–what he/she chooses to include or bypass–as it does with the truth of the subjects life. In this course, students will interrogate the authorial presentation of subject as they learn to examine the complicated relationships of narrators and readers. Students will write a series of essays that range from short sketches to longer biographies and develop a journal of personal narrative and self-expression that will culminate in a 5- page autobiography. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CRW 210 - Creative Nonfiction


    Creative non-fiction blends the craft techniques found in great literature (dialogue, narration, voice, suspense, and point of view) with the authenticity and ironies found in real life stories and researched points of view. This genre focuses on compelling writing that is always true, but not necessarily objective. Voice and point of view shape and color the writer’s subject. Students in this class will therefore discover and practice techniques for writing about themselves, those around them, what they see (particularly in regard to art), and how they perceive the world around them. They will read and write vigorously, develop skills as collaborative learners, serve as a community of writers for each other, and develop both respect for and practice in non-fiction writing as an art form. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 211 - Writing from the Senses


    This class is meant to reconnect us to the world outside ourselves, which we know originally–and arguably foremost–through our senses. Through close reading of the works of authors who capture sensory experience vividly, freshly, and compellingly, along with hands-on experiences of their own, students will learn how to ground their work in the five senses, how to conjure the senses from language alone, and ultimately how these techniques can be tools to immerse readers more fully in their work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 220 - Advanced Workshop (fiction, poetry or nonfiction)


    Upper-level workshop in fiction, nonfiction, or poetry (rotating by semester); majors may take this twice (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 317 - Hybridity


    Students will consider the territory along the borders of literary and artistic genres. Through readings, exercises, and collaboration, we will see what innovative territory can be created when genres blend, whether it is between poetry and prose, or language and the visual image. We will also examine the written and artistic process, analyzing similarities and differences between mediums, and searching for ways that these techniques can energize our creative work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 318 - Multicultural American Literature


    This course analyzes American literary texts by writers openly challenging the traditional literary canon and acknowledging the race, gender and class divisions at the heart of American culture. The goal of the course is for students to demonstrate understanding of the relationship between politics, identity, and the place of literature in contemporary American society. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CRW 319 - Radical Revisions


    All experienced writers talk about the value of revision and its necessity, but it’s too rare that students get the opportunity to delve into the nuts and bolts of the process. In this class, students will peer behind the curtain to look at the earlier versions of published work, and see how polished, artful works don’t emerge wholly-formed, but instead are the product of messy, inchoate, often numerous drafts. In addition, they will learn a wide range of revision strategies and techniques, and apply these works to their own fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 320 - Writing and Publishing Practicum


    This course serves as an introduction to the art of critical and interpretive writing for magazines, newspapers and other public venues such as blogs. Focus will be on book reviews, editorial essays, opinion pieces and sociopolitical commentaries. Students will analyze editorial writing in reputable online sites, learn how to best uncover reliable data to support their opinions, and workshop their own publishable editorial pieces. Students will also maintain and grow the Ayris blog. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 322 - Pre-Senior Practicum


    This course focuses on preparation for senior studio including researching local and virtual spaces to hold readings, contributing to preparation of the Visiting Writers Series, creating a schedule for writing a rough draft, networking with visual artists and designers for publication, marketing, and exhibition of your project, brainstorming ideas, and beginning a draft. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 330 - Advanced Workshop II


    Rotating advanced workshops with topics such as experimental fiction writing, flash fiction, writing inspired by cinematic techniques, writing for children and young adults, de-ranged language poetics, graphic novel and comics, horror writing, science fiction and surrealism. Writing BFA students take this course three times, with three different topics. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 332 - Junior/Senior Seminar


    This upper level seminar will focus on guiding students through the stages of writing a longer criticism piece on a particular rotating topic or author in literary studies. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 332 - Junior/Senior Seminar


    This upper level seminar will focus on guiding students through the stages of writing a longer criticism piece on a particular rotating topic or author in literary studies. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CRW 342 - Ayris Practicum


    In this course, students will publish a print-based arts magazine under the supervision of a faculty member. The magazine accepts submissions from diverse literary and visual art genres, but of utmost importance are professionalism and the qualitative standards of the work. Students will be expected to review all submissions and research other literary journals for practices and standards as well as keep up with the Ayris blog and Stall Street journal, as well as collaborate with other spaces on and off campus for events and readings. (3 Credits )
  •  

    CRW 354 - Graphic Novel Writing


    In Writing the Graphic Novel students dig deep into the visual language of sequential art to develop an understanding of how the elements of story work in this diverse and vibrant medium. We will analyze comic book and graphic novel texts from a variety of genres while synthesizing observations on the form and content of comics to create original works. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 399 - Immersion: Research for Artists


    Do you have a particular topic that youve always been curious about, but never seem to find the time to fully explore? In this class, youll get to indulge that curiosity at last, delving into subjects of your own choosing through research and first-hand experience, and bringing them back to your own work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    CRW 401/403 - Senior Studio I & II


    This course affords seniors in the Creative Writing program the opportunity to work independently on a longterm project that concludes with a public reading/presentation and professionally bound piece at the end of the second semester. Each senior selects a project that will be the culmination of the work the student has completed in the major. This could include such projects as: a short novel or novella; a collection of short fiction, poetry or essays; a screenplay or other performance piece; or a mixed genre piece involving visual art or design and writing. In addition, each senior completes a capstone senior thesis that serves an introduction to the creative work bound in the final piece. (3 Credits)
  • Design (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    DES 101 - Principles of Design I


    This course will present the fundamental Design disciplines and Design thinking through readings, writing, visual problem solving, and critical analysis. The student will work with a variety of traditional and digital media, with an emphasis on the multiplicity and purpose of Graphic Design in regards to solving communication problems. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 102 - Principles of Design I (Non-Majors)


    This course will present the fundamentals of Graphic Design while touching on foundation art theories and vocabulary. The general principles and practices of Graphic Design in this course are based on the integration of type and image to convey a message. Through examination and analysis of professional graphic design, students will become familiar with the relationship between graphic design process, creative solutions and critical thinking. The student will work with a variety of traditional and digital media, with an emphasis on the process of design, composition and typography. This course will provide a solid foundation for moving on to more complex Graphic Design classes. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 110 - Investigating Typography


    Typography is the formal study of letterforms. In this course, students will gain perspective into this important field by starting with a focus on early visual communication, symbols, handwritten letterforms, calligraphy and the development of movable type. Students will explore ways to categorize type into families and identify and define similarities and subtle differences in classical typefaces. Class discussions, projects, critiques and lectures will focus on typographic terminology and vocabulary, as well as the aesthetic discipline of using type effectively as a designer. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 201 - Print and Press


    A combination of silkscreen, monoprint and letterpress processes and skills will be imparted to students through a variety of hands-on projects, demonstrations, discussions, and critiques. The immediacy, versatility, and visual possibilities that are unique attributes of these mediums challenge students to visualize their work in new ways and bring an increasing level complexity, depth, and refinement. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 202 - Principles of Design II


    Students will continue to explore the creative design process that helps them communicate ideas and information to a target audience. Higher level, theoretical ideas related to communication, design and cognitive theories. Students will engage in intermediate design projects through print-related software and traditional media. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 205 - Photography for Designers


    Students develop the critical thinking and technical skills to use photography in their work as designers. Exploration in digital photography, studio lighting, photo editing/manipulation, color correction, and professional relationship through theoretical perspectives and practical applications of imagery are focused on as well as their relationships to graphic design. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 211 - Typography II: Functionality


    Students will continue to build on the skills learned in Typography 1. Class discussions, projects and critiques will concentrate on the crucial role of typography and the relationship between type and image in contemporary graphic design. Students will learn advanced techniques for setting type by looking at issues of text type, typographic structure and hierarchy. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 302 - Marketing and Advertising


    Advertising is the art of persuasion and as designers we greatly influence the choices made by consumers. This is a course in the development and presentation of visual and verbal messages that move consumers to action. The basic principles of advertising will be presented from creative writing to branding consistency and integrity. The hierarchy and structure of an advertising agency will be discussed to provide students with a realistic view of the industry. Emphasis on concept development and writing. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 303 - Branding & Identity


    Students combine their knowledge of typography, image-making, problem solving techniques and conceptual skills developed in Principles Design I and II to create integrated solutions to sophisticated design and communication problems. One large project will be focused on during the semester, that will span a variety of application methods. Emphasis on complex identity systems and cross-platform application. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 307 - Information and Data Architecture


    This unique course introduces the basic concepts, methods and procedures of information design through pictograms, infographics and wayfinding systems. Students will learn visual systems and informational structures such as maps, graphs, charts timelines, and diagrams. Emphasis is placed on the exploration of conceptual and visual solutions. Students will also engage in the creative and research process of organizing, visualizing and communicating data driven information. Students will design solutions, which make complex information easier to understand and use by a specific audience through design. This course uses studio projects, individual and class critiques, lectures, discussions, and readings to engage its students. Permission of Design Chair is required if prerequisites are not met. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 310 - Design Internship


    This course is an individualized internship that focuses on the student`s emphasis within the design industry. Students participate in industry specific training on-site with professionals and are evaluated by predetermined curriculum objectives that have been agreed upon by the employer, instructor and student. This course provides the student with valuable on-the-job experience, interaction with industry professionals, and preparation for job entry. Students must interview for and acquire their internship site. Coordinated with the Office of Career Services (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 315 - Hand Drawn Typography


    Creative exploration and visual interpretation of letters and words. Students will learn how to recognize hand-lettering as opposed to typeset and explore ways in which creative hand-lettering is appropriate and can be used to achieve  innovative and visually exciting results. Various approaches to hand-lettering, such as the illustration of letters, words and phrases, and non-conventional type usage. Conceptual and material prompts will be used as a platform for you to explore both personal vision and professional applications. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 318 - Experimental Design


    Experimental graphic design explores the intersection of typography, color, imagery and photography, media, technology, execution and application to push the boundaries of graphic design. Working in 2D, 3D, and time-based media, students will play and discover new ways of working, then apply their findings to identify and solve design problems and create compelling work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 320 - Design New Hampshire


    Providing the first glimpse into working with real clients, students will form an on campus agency. Production of actual graphic projects; attendance, work ethic and professional practices emphasized. Also the study of methods and techniques used to producing and distributing design projects will be investigated. Such as printing technologies, pre-press, bindery techniques, sustainability, budget, digital media requirements and scheduling as topics. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 401 - Senior Studio: Capstone


    The Senior Studio serves as a capstone course. It is an independent, personal pursuit designed to contribute to the creation of an advanced body of thematic work. The course will include directed lectures and critiques to support the critical awareness necessary for the emerging professional artist. Each concentration has established specific objectives beyond the common core for its respective seniors. Students participate in mid-term and final group critiques. The course also includes visiting artists and professional presentations. Restricted to Seniors. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 405 - Interactive Design


    Balancing functionality with aesthetics, this course introduces interface design principles and production tools. Students are introduced to the concepts and basic principles of user experience. The integration of concept and content will be realized through projects designed for the web. Production tool like html, css, and relevant software will be introduced. Students will develop a website using CMS tools. Materials: Epson Roll Paper and Specified tools for lettering. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 408 - Time Based Design


    In this course students will examine the increasingly important role time-based media plays in the world of graphic design. Applications include video, stop animation, storyboards and sequential narratives. Students will concentrate on using storytelling techniques and experimental structures to provide the viewer with an immersion experience. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 420 - UI Functionality


    Students will examine how to design good user interfaces, covering important design principles (learnability, visibility, error prevention, efficiency, graphic design and design alternatives) and the human capabilities that motivate them (including perception, motor skills, color vision, attention, and human error). (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 450 - Contemporary Portfolio


    Contemporary Portfolio serves as a capstone course in the Design Department. It is an independent, personal pursuit of a creative body of work showcased in a variety of ways, including physical, digital, and web applications. The course will include directed lectures, student research and presentations, classroom discussions and conversations, and focused work on improving and refining the previous projects done in the program. Offering feedback, suggestions, and inspiration, the class as a group helps each individual produce their best work. Students participate in mid-term and final group critiques. Restricted to Seniors. (3 Credits)
  •  

    DES 499 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  • Drawing (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    DRA 201 - Figure Drawing I


    A focused, introductory study of the human figure. An understanding of the anatomy and its impact on surface form will be explored in a variety of drawing mediums. The course will emphasize observational, anatomical accuracy, and a rigorous use and awareness of line and tonal qualities. Prerequisite: FND112 Compositional Drawing (3 Credits)
  •  

    DRA 202 - Figure Drawing II


    This course builds on the concepts and skills covered in DRA201 Figure Drawing I. Students will negotiate the challenge of continued anatomical accuracy while introducing more expressive approaches with respect to mark making, color, scale, and series. (3 Credits)
  • Foundations (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    FND 101/102 - Foundations Core


    Foundations Core is a year-long course in the fall and spring semesters that is a required course for all incoming first year students. This course is designed to introduce a student to the creative process by exposing the student to the ideas and the process by which creatives make their work. This course uses history, culture, visual and written works to engage students and inform them as they create works that represent their thought process and strengths in a chosen media. (9 Credits)
  •  

    FND 199 - Foundations Labs


    Lab Topics Include: ANALYZING THE ART OF COMICS AND CARTOONS Students learn to critically examine, analyze and demonstrate their understanding of art and design through focused study and examination of a diverse sample of sequential art including comic books, newspaper strips, editorial cartoons and graphic novels. Engaged learners will read deeply and articulate the ways in which elements of story, style, structure, design and composition all contribute to the success or failure of comics. The lab will culminate with a comics-making project in which students will demonstrate their understanding of storytelling through sequential art. MAKING ZINES Zines are magazines, typically self-publications, motivated by a desire for self-expression, not commercial endeavors or profit. Zine making will explore the process of handmade DIY magazines. This Lab will help students develop a burgeoning understanding of how to use text and image to develop content. INTRO TO DIGITAL DRAWING Digital Drawing is a studio based lab in drawing taught using art/drawing focused software. Over the course of the lab students will explore drawing basics while learning introductory skills in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Students will use the Wacom Cintiq to explore gesture, mark making, rendering, value, texture, and color. Students will use design language to critique finished drawings in a digital environment. ABSTRACT DRAWING Abstract Drawing is a studio based lab in drawing designed to develop a students skill in and understanding and applying the elements of art and design theory to compose drawings. These drawings will utilize direct observation and composition as a tool to help students compose works that focuses more on expression, gesture, and formal construction with less emphasis on direct observation. PORTRAITURE This lab seeks to develop a students understanding of rending by practicing the skills that are developed through portraiture. In this course student will be exposed to the basic principles used in drawing portraiture with expression through a focus on gesture and composition and introduction to basic anatomy. PRINTMAKING: SILKSCREEN Intro to Printmaking is a lab that introduces the printmaking process of screen-printing. Using examples from historical and contemporary printmaking, students will begin to develop an understanding of the technique and processes for Silkscreen printing. Students will be encouraged to use this knowledge to incorporate print as a means of creative personal expression. THE PHOTOGRAPHERS EYE This lab is based on how different ways photography is used as a language, such as: perception, social identity, documentation, advertising, etc. The class will talk about photographic skills like framing and cropping, color, control of depth of field, and how these things effect what and how we read images. SCREENWRITING This 5-week lab is designed to teach the student the beginning structure of screenwriting and narrative. Over the course of this lab students will discuss and practice act structure, dialogue and narrative within their own mini-scripts. STORYTELLING In our lives, we have all been captivated by a brilliant story. We have all experienced that feeling when, transfixed by a potent narrative, the world around us falls away. Removed from the daily pressures, complaints, and obsessions, we are transported to unchartered realms and deeper states of contemplation, our minds enlivened and senses heightened. Stories not only provide an escape from the mundane, they allow us to find, and understand, our place in the chaotic scrum of contemporary life. In this five-week lab, through taking on the roles of both reader and writer, we will explore the elements of well-crafted storytelling. We will engage in close, in-depth readings of narrative structures, develop an understanding of the fundamental elements of fiction, examine the value of storytelling in art, and improve proficiency in crafting narratives. (1-Credit)
  • Humanities (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    HUM 202 - Self-Publishing, DIY Broadcasting, and Trans of Pop Media


    The successes of self-published artists working in fringe genres and forms, as well as marginalized creators whose perspectives were not often welcomed by traditional media, has pushed traditional media to recognize and serve new audiences and creators; for instance, many of todays top YA and childrens comics creators (Raina Telgemeier, Gene Luen Yang, Faith Erin Hicks) began their careers self-publishing webcomics in the mid-00s. This course will explore the expansion of self-published media, focusing on comics, podcasting, and prose fiction, looking at how self-publishers in these areas have influenced mass media, and introducing the tools and practical skills that will allow students to begin self-publishing their own work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    HUM 212 - Introduction to Philosophy


    Introduction to Philosophy is a beginning topical exploration into human ideas, thinking and argumentation. Using various philosophical theories and perspectives, Introduction to Philosophy presents the underlying study of the concept of wisdom and the elusive pursuit of truth. Formulated on classic questions that have stirred humanity for ages, students analyze key insights and processes that refine critical thinking skills and develop sound judgment. The course is divided into the study of four distinct units of study: metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics and ethics. (3 Credits)
  •  

    HUM 340 - Ethics and Contemporary Social Problems


    The course considers ethical dilemmas and contemporary social problems that can arise when the individuals values conflict with those of the organization, society or world system. Within this course, students use case studies, their own experiences, and current events to examine ethical tensions within the framework of both personal and social outcomes. Students will study popular ethical theories in order to better understand in-depth the perspective and reasoning behind such tensions. From theory evaluation, various ethical models, as well as classroom exercises and discussions, students will enhance their critical thinking skills as well as deepen their understanding of the perspectives of others. (3 Credits)
  •  

    HUM 354 - Comics and the Global Media


    The course examines how nation states have used comics and related graphic forms for the promulgation of political ideology. We will concentrate on several case studies in the production of the comics and their relationships with other forms of mainstream media in order to concrete and strengthen the connections between theoretical accounts of globalization and the circulation of this text/image genre. We conclude the course by looking at how comics have also participated actively in underground and resistant social movements. The course is divided into four parts, each addressing an important aspect of globalized and international comics industries, and illustrating the ways in which the funnies are an increasingly important genre in the global distribution of convergent media products as well as for (inter)national political ideologies. By illuminating the linkages between this booming assemblage of graphic genres, their places in global cultural-industrial flows and global divisions of labor, and the persisting possibilities of their critical as well as their commercial social symbolic roles, this class will enable students to comprehend globalization and the media in ways that connect intimately to their own cultural practices. (3 Credits)
  •  

    LIT 399 - Special Topic


    Special Topics in Literature (3 Credits)
  • Illustration (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    ILL 111 - Intro to Illustration


    This course will introduce and develop the method, process, and applied techniques utilized in two-dimensional visual narration. With heavy emphasis on concept/ideation, thumbnails, sketches, value, drawing, color, edge control, and finish, students will explore a variety of traditional mediums while creating assignment based narrative imagery within structured deadlines. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 113 - Illustration Environments


    Building upon the introductory content from the Intro to Illustration class, Environments will further develop students understanding of atmospheres in which visual narratives are created and immersed. Applications of these elements will be utilized with traditional mediums in authoring visual focus, harmony, discord, cohesiveness, a perception of depth, and dimension. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 204 - Digital Illustration I


    This is an introductory course for Digital Illustration. Basic instruction on how to create artwork in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator is provided, then utilized by students in creating illustration assignments. Students must work in accordance with the methods utilized in traditional illustration classes; i.e. thumbnails, refined sketches, value studies, and color studies. Class will consist of demos, short lectures, and working lab time with individual assistance and group critiques. Final illustrations will be assessed according to adherence to standard work processes, project specifications as well as technical application and finish. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 213 - Illustration Avenues


    Illustration styles and techniques, as well as conceptual problem-solving, are highlighted in this course which provides an overview of the profession. Illustration Avenues focuses on five distinct areas of the illustration marketplace: Editorial, Institutional, Advertising, Concept/Character Design and Book Illustration. The course will combine provocative and stimulating real world assignments with professional practices. Guest speakers offer different views and share their experience of the art direction/design/illustration profession. Prerequisite: ILL112 Illustration Traditional Mediums (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 215 - Oil for Illustrators


    The diverse introduction of representational painters best serve the illustrator in his/her search for personal style. This illustration course will reinforce current notions of narrative picture making methods. Oil painting movements and artists will be introduced and applied to narrative illustration assignments. Focus on drawing, representational painting methodologies, oil techniques and painting materials will be employed to broaden the artists’ understanding of image making to best serve the breadth of competencies required of an illustrator. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 315 - Digital Illustration II


    Digital Illustration II will concentrate on the use of Photoshop in the creation of basic illustration assignments. Instructor will guide students through the process of concept, producing thumbnails, research, photography and composition to go along with the introduction of digital painting techniques to execute assignments. Students will gain an understanding on how to use many of Photoshops tools, along with how to properly create files, layers, and use of filters. Quick commands will also be highlighted to improve working efficiency. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 335 - Narrative Figure


    This course will introduce and develop the utilization of the figure as an expressive narrative element in illustration. A variety of art genres, both historical and contemporary, will be analyzed and used to inform the successful and compelling integration of the figure in illustration. Students will complete exercises, studies, and finished works throughout the course while advancing their oil painting capabilities. Prerequisite: ILL212 Illustration: Traditional Mediums and DRA202 Figure Drawing II (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 340 - Advanced Illustration


    The Advanced Illustration course(s) provide the opportunity to explore and implement advanced illustration methods and techniques towards particular areas of interest. Courses including The Portrait, Ink and Color, and Collage/Montage will fulfill the Advanced Illustration requirement. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 341 - Advanced Illustration


    This courses focuses on identifying and conveying structural components of the face which when depicted accurately, enables the artist to create likenesses through realism, or alter into character. This advanced painting course provides an in depth exploration into the historical utilization of portraiture through illustration and fine art while utilizing drawing, oil and water based media. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 350 - Illustration Series


    Concept, narrative, technical exploration and style through a cohesive body of works threaded by theme and viewpoint are highlighted in this opportunity to develop work in a series. Students will apply 2-3 different mediums/techniques of their choice throughout the coursework. Prerequisite: ILL212 Illustration: Traditional Mediums (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 351 - Concept Art


    Concept Art is one of the largest fields of illustration. In this course we will explore Concept Art techniques, which are primarily utilized in game and film creation. Students will focus on creating multiple solutions to visual elements within an imagined environment. the thematic visual experience comprised of character, environment & architecture will be explored. (3 credits)
  •  

    ILL 354 - Graphic Novel Illustration


    Graphic Novel and Visual Story Telling is a study of the art form of comics which is a narrative style that uses a combination of words and images to tell a story. Students of this course will study theories behind visual storytelling by reading excerpts from some of the best examples of graphic literature today. As such, students will study visual metaphor, story spark, plot development, panel structure, word placement, physiognomy, storyboarding, word versus image and page design. These elements will serve students as they develop their own story, design a character, and create thumbnails and finished pages of a mini-comic or first chapter of a longer work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 360 - Community Studio


    The Illustration Community Studio course provides the opportunity for Illustration students to further immerse themselves within the professional practice of their field. Students will identify and work with local and state clientele in creating commissioned projects, including visual content for events, posters, exhibitions, playbills, and community campaigns. Clients include Opera NH, Palace Theatre, Easter Seals of NH, Intown Manchester, and NH Audubon. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 399 - Special Topics:Ink and Color


    Students will explore the history, tradition and artists of western ink art & colorization and its influence and application within the contemporary illustration field. Strong drawing, aesthetic applications, design principals and painting methods from editorial, comics and sequential art will be utilized while visually conveying provided and self-created content. The course will focus on traditional mediums (inks) for drawing, and incorporate both traditional and digital methods for colorization. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 401/403 - Senior Studio I & II


    The Senior Studio serves as the capstone course. It is an independent, personal pursuit designed to contribute to the creation of an advanced body of thematic work. The course will include directed lectures and critiques to support the critical awareness necessary for the emerging professional artist. Each concentration has established specific objectives beyond the common core for its respective seniors. Students participate in midterm and final group critiques. The course also includes visiting artists and professional presentations. Restricted to Seniors. (3 Credits)
  •  

    ILL 499 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  • Jewelry (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    JWL 111 - Small Metal Design


    Students will build traditional foundation skills in 3D design while developing technical skills executing basic projects working in copper, silver or bronze. Students will develop a balance between technical ability and individual expression as they execute metal projects that may include rings, tea strainers, forged spoons, containers or other objects. (3 Credits)
  •  

    JWL 113 - Small Metal Design II


    Continued exploration and development from JWL111. Students will build traditional foundation skills in 3D design while developing technical skills executing basic projects working in copper, silver or bronze. Students will develop a balance between technical ability and individual expression as they execute metal projects that may include rings, tea strainers, forged spoons, containers or other objects. (3 Credits)
  • Photography (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    PHO 101 - Photography I


    Students are introduced to the black and white darkroom through film processing and printmaking. A firm foundation of basic darkroom techniques is formed as a starting point for further work. Basic photography subjects such as film types, lenses and filters, and principles of proper exposure are covered. Weekly critiques of students work in-progress and presentations on majors figures in photography will help guide students to create a cohesive and technically successful body of work. A 35mm film camera is required. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 202 - Photography II


    This course will continue to build upon the skills acquired in Photography I with an emphasis on the creation of the fine art black and white exhibition print. Paper and developer choices will be demonstrated and discussed along with chemical toning options and print bleaching methods. The student will work throughout the semester to create a unified body of work with a strong point of view and will produce archival fiber base prints to complete the course work. Discussion of the work will include the viewing of both historical and contemporary photographers who have explored similar issues: i.e., child labor photography by Lewis Hine and Sebastian Selgado or western American landscape images by Carleton Watkins and Ansel Adams. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 203 - The Handmade Photo


    This course explores the history and practice of 19th century photographic printing techniques, including the cyanotype, albumen and the palladium print. Students will spend time in class making images with a 4x5 view camera. The remaining class time will be devoted to mastering the craft aspects of creating hand-coated prints using light sensitive chemistry and a variety of fine art papers and related contact printing equipment. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 204 - Controlled Lighting


    This introductory course explores the use of an electronic studio flash system for effective lighting of portraits, still-lives, two and three dimensional art objects, or interiors. Through hands-on demonstrations, students will learn how to create professional-caliber color and black and white photographs. Basic lighting techniques will be covered, including lighting ratios, soft versus hard lighting, bounce lighting, and Kelvin temperature. Students will shoot assignments with a DSLR camera for critique and evaluation. A thematic lighting portfolio will be due at the end of the semester. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 205 - Digital Photography I


    Photography students only, students must have a DSLR camera. This course introduces students to the operation and use of a digital single-lens-reflex camera and related techniques. Topics of camera operation include white balance, histograms, file format choices, and lens selection. This course also introduces students to the use of computers, software, scanners and large format photographic quality ink-jet printers in order to create high-quality color and black and white images from their RAW, jpeg, and tiff files. Additionally, students will learn how to scan negatives, transparencies, and prints to produce high-resolution files and then edit these files in Adobe Photoshop before output to the printer. Calibration of equipment will also be covered along with the use of ICC profiles for proper color rendition on a variety of fine art paper surfaces. No previous computer experience is required. Prerequisite: (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 301 - Experimental Photography


    The course objective is the artistic exploration of untapped possibilities of the photographic medium. Students will use digital imaging as well as the traditional black and white darkroom. Working from slides, prints, artwork, negatives or digital camera files, and sometimes without a negative at all, students will experiment with the myriad choices of visual expression and presentation through photography. Students will discuss the quality of light, the history of experimental photography and the future of the medium. Students will work with pinhole cameras, photograms, alternative emulsions, and their crossover interaction with digital to create a body of work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 302 - Digital Photography II


    This course builds on the skills acquired in Digital Photography I covering advanced techniques for color, contrast, and saturation control, as well as greater control in the printing of monochrome images using archival quality inkjet technology. Adjustment layers, advanced selection techniques, channels, and the use of type as well as masking techniques are presented. Photoshop controls open the possibility to go well beyond the traditional darkroom to enhance the detail in a negative or alter the color palette of a digital image. Digital camera controls including the use of histogram for precise exposure control and file format choices are discussed along with the advantages of using the camera RAW file format. Students are responsible to produce a body of work integrating the techniques learned in the class. Prerequisite: PHO205 Digital Photography I. PHOTOGRAPHY STUDENTS ONLY: STUDENTS MUST HAVE A DSLR CAMERA. PHO205 (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 303 - The View Camera


    This is an introductory class for photography students to use the 4x5 view camera for portrait, landscape, and architectural photography. The course will explore camera movements to control perspective and depth of field through swings, shifts, and tilts, as well as other camera adjustments. Equipment selection including lenses, film-holders, and meters used in view camera work will be covered along with filtration, film handling, and archival print processing. Scanning techniques to create high-resolution black and white files for large format printing will be covered and practiced during the semester. Discussion of the Zone System for previsualization of print tone values will assist students to understand how to make the most expressive and successful prints. Critiques and lectures will guide students through technical and aesthetic issues as they complete a portfolio of matted black and white prints. Masters of large format camera including Richard Avedon, Ansel Adams, Alfred Steglitz, Paul Strand, Eugene Atget, Lois Connor, Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Weston, Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange will be presented and discussed. Prerequisite: PHO202 Photography II (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 304 - Photo IV: Intro Color Photo


    A firm foundation of basic color photography techniques is formed as a starting point for further work. Through a series of assignments, students will learn about color balance, colored light, reflective color, color theory, and hue, saturation, and luminosity. Using this information, students will begin to understand their color preferences and how color impacts the viewers response to an image. Significant historical and contemporary color photographers (such as William Eggleston, Stephen Shore, Annie Leibovitz, Joel Meyerowitz) will be presented and discussed. Students will use digital cameras to complete assignments and create their portfolio. They will also learn how to see a color-cast in a print. Critiques and lectures will guide students through technical and aesthetic issues as they complete a portfolio of 12 to 15 matted color prints. Prerequisite: PHO202 Photography II and PHO205 Digital Photography I (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 308 - Digital Print


    The course will solidify a firm foundation of digital printing techniques as a starting point for further work. Through a series of assignments and exercises, students will learn how to correctly prepare and adjust a file for printing, as well as calibrate monitors, and make an informed decision in regarding to the surface being printed on. Students will learn color management as well as exploring a variety of printing substrates such as but not limited to: A variety of papers, fabric, plastic, metals and other surfaces. Students will also experiment with other digital processes to create one of a kind works of art. Students will study the history of the digital printed media as a basis for contextualizing their work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 315 - Moving Image


    The Moving Image course is a cross disciplinary course for both designers and photographers. It is designed to provide an opportunity for students to communicate and create time-based narratives, documentaries and art using digital video technology. Students will create various digital video projects combining student-authored short stories, literary adaptations, sequential narratives and journalistic inquiry as core content. Visual and conceptual foundations of a cinematic view and rhythm of visual sequence editing will be employed to create a several short video projects. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 330 - Color Photography


    A firm foundation of basic color photography concepts and techniques is formed as a starting point for further work. Through a series of assignments, class presentations and discussions (that include both film and digital technologies) students will learn about color, color balance, color of light, reflective color, color theory, hue, saturation and luminosity. Using this information, students will learn how color is communicated and how it impacts the viewers response to an image. Significant historical and contemporary color photographers (such as Herold Edgerton, William Eggleston, Stephen Shore, Annie Liebovitz, Susan Meiselas, Uta Barth, S. Billie Mandle and others) will be presented and discussed. Students will use both film and digital cameras to complete assignments and create their final portfolio. Students will also learn how to scan reflective/transparency media properly and calibrate the equipment they use. Students will learn how to see “color cast” in files and prints and how to correct it (both globally and locally). Critiques and lectures will guide students through technical and aesthetic issues as they complete portfolio of 12 to 15 matted color prints. Formerly PHO 304. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 399 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 401/402 - Senior Studio I & II


    The Senior Studio serves as the capstone course. It is an independent, personal pursuit designed to contribute to the creation of an advanced body of thematic work. The course will include directed lectures and critiques to support the critical awareness necessary for the emerging professional artist. Each concentration has established specific objectives beyond the common core for its respective seniors. Students participate in midterm and final group critiques. The course also includes visiting artists and professional presentations. Restricted to Seniors. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 403 - Advanced Handmade Photography


    This course is restricted to Juniors and Seniors. Art Education Photography students may take this course as a Photo Special Topic, if they receive permission from the chairperson of Art Education and Photography. The Advanced Handmade Photography class will build on skills developed in the required class Photo III: The Handmade Photo. In the Photo III class students are introduced to the 19th century handmade process of cyanotypes, Van Dyke, albumen and palladium. This advanced class will concentrate on one handmade process. Students will both improve their skills from this foundation and explore in more depth a variety of techniques associated with handmade process to create their images. Using digital negatives, students will experiment with a variety of papers and/or fabrics, toners, chemical formulas, and lesser-used methods unique in the process. Students will be expected to create a portfolio of images, keep a process journal, and conduct research about the process and its practitioners. This course will also help students further understand the recent resurgence of historical photographic processes as a contemporary art form. Prerequisites: PHO203 Photography III: The Handmade Photograph and PHO205 Digital Photography I (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 405 - Photo Essay


    This course is restricted to Juniors and Seniors. This course is designed to expand upon the traditional meaning of the photo essay by examining the work of individual artists and how each approached this genre. Beginning with the strict definition of an essay and moving towards both a broader understanding and interpretation, students will learn how photographs can be produced and organized in series to create larger essays with more visual and intellectual complexity. They will learn that an essay need not be constructed around a single idea, but rather, can be layered both conceptually and thematically (in as examples such as portraits, urban or rural landscapes, neighborhoods, social groups, family, cities or geographic regions, subcultures, etc.) Ultimately, these multidimensional essays or portraits become a larger document that is greater than the sum of their parts. Students will create a portfolio based on their own interpretation of the photographic essay. Prerequisite: PHO304 Photography IV: Intro to Color Photography (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 406 - Documentary Photography


    The Documentary Photography course explores the camera as a tool for the visual investigation of contemporary issues and examines the process and possibilities of telling stories through pictures. Students gain practical experience through a semester-long photo-documentary project and discussions of photography in the humanities, emphasizing documentary photography and its social and historical significance. The course examines the work of a diverse group of artists and discusses the methods they used to create bodies of work with visual and intellectual complexity along with analyzing contrasting styles as they are applied to similar themes (formal portraits, subcultures, family, cities, etc.) as ways of demonstrating how different interpretations can be equally effective. This course will also examine the relationship between words and images using books, magazines, film, and on-line resources. The class will also provide concrete feedback through group and individual critiques that will allow students to articulate ideas about their own work and fellow students’ work. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PHO 499 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  • Professional Studies (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    PRO 101 - Your Professional Creative Path


    In this class, students will engage in the fundamentals of specializing in the art field through project based learning, collaboration, lecture, readings, discussion, speakers, and field-trips. Exploration and research of artists pathways, financial literacy, and managing a positive life/work balance will be developed. Students will learn effective professional written and verbal communication skills, fair use, developing social media strategies and maximizing your online portfolio. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRO 201 - Promoting and Packaging Yourself


    This course will assist creatives in breaking through the competitive landscape with engaging, brand-savvy promotional materials, utilizing print, broadcast and new media. Topics such as branding, target marketing, integrated cross-media promotional initiatives, public relations and social media strategies will be covered. Students will also set business and marketing goals, create a personal identity system (letterhead, envelope, business card, labels and thank you cards), resume, CV, promotional video and online website targeted to their creative markets. Presentation, writing, collaboration and leadership skills will be strongly encouraged and nurtured throughout the course. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRO 301 - Artist as Entrepreneur


    In this team-based class, students will focus on acquiring the skills needed to maintain a self-sustaining career in the arts. Professional communication skills will be honed while researching real world entrepreneurship as practiced by creative professionals in the local community and beyond. Effective money management, pricing structures, basic accounting skills such as taxes, statements of cash flow and capital and personal budgeting will be covered. Students will also develop an understanding of business ethics and the value of their time by incorporating market research, multiple funding sources, and contracts into their artistic and life practice. (3 Credits)
  • Printmaking (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    PRT 201 - Printmaking I


    This course will introduce several disciplines of printmaking: relief, screen-printing, lithography and intaglio, as well as related techniques such as monoprint and embossing. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 203 - Printmaking II:Relief


    This course covers traditional and non-traditional methods of relief printmaking. Multiblock color printing and reduction block printing will be introduced. Emphasis will be given to the unique graphic aesthetic of the linoblock/woodblock. Two-dimensional formal and conceptual issues along with contemporary and art historical issues will be explored. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 204 - Printmaking II: Silkscreen


    This course will survey the hand and photographic processes of silkscreen (a.k.a. Serigraphy). Various hand drawing and photo methods will be demonstrated and used to create editioned prints. Historic and contemporary silkscreen prints will be discussed throughout the course. Emphasis will be on two-dimensional design as well as technical and conceptual approaches to the silkscreen process. Prerequisite: PRT201 Printmaking I (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 205 - Printmaking II: Intaglio


    This course will be a survey of differing media that belong to the family of intaglio. The course will cover drypoint, line etching, spray aquatint, soft ground, white ground, and sugar lift. Two-dimensional formal and conceptual issues, as well as multi-plate color processes, will be addressed. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 208 - Printmaking II: Lithography


    This course will survey the printmaking processes of Plate and Stone Lithography. Various hand drawing and photo methods will be demonstrated and used to create editioned prints. Historic and contemporary lithographic prints will be discussed throughout the course. Emphasis will be on two-dimensional as well as technical and conceptual approaches to the lithographic process. Prerequisite: PRT201 Printmaking I (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 209 - Intro to Book Arts


    Artists have long exploited the poetic interplay between words and pictures. Book Arts is a course that encourages students to experiment with texts and images through the disciplines of writing, book design, and book constructions. It is intended to give students the opportunity to develop writing practice, while equipping them with the bookbinding knowledge needed to create forms in which to house their written work. Students in this class will keep a writing journal (for responses to writing prompts and assignments), learn bookbinding structures each week, and complete midterm and final projects that combine the writing and studio components of this course in a coherent and unified manner. Book structures will include: simple folded paper (Accordion, Ox Plow, & Flutter), and sewn (Pamphlet, Coptic, & Long stitch), dimensional (Tunnel Carousel & Pop-Ups), and altered books (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 303 - Printmaking II: Monotype


    This course will look at the history of monotype printmaking and explain how it can be made using basic or elaborate processes. Students will learn a variety of techniques used in Monotype such as: painting, direct tracing, additive and subtractive, and multi-layering. Current editioning and exhibiting practices relating to the monotype will be discussed and employed. The course will culminate in an exhibition that showcases finished monotypes. Prereqs: PRT201 Printmaking I, PTG101 Painting 1 (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 306 - Letterpress


    This course is an introduction to all things letterpress, including tools, materials, equipment and technique. We will also discuss form and content, current issues in the world of letterpress printing, and develop knowledge of artists using these techniques within their art practice. Over the course of the fifteen weeks students will become proficient at: making a variety of printed pieces, including broadsides, chapbooks, zines, and other printed matter using letterpress printing equipment and tools appropriately and safely basic printing skills; typesetting, use of polymer plates, developing knowledge of the rules of printmaking using a variety of materials (substrates and alternative printing materials) and techniques appropriately, as well as experimenting Finding ways to use these techniques and practices within your own work Working as a team (print partners rule!) the history of letterpress printing and how it is used today, by both artists and master printers (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 310 - Internship/Community Based Learning


    Internship/Community Based Learning (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 399 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 401 - Individual Study Printmaking


    Individual Study Printmaking (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 420 - Experimental Media


    See syllabus for course description (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 433 - Printmaking III


    This culminating printmaking class offers students the opportunity to develop their unique voice as an artist/printmaker by focusing in depth on the technique of their choice. The work is a continuing development of the processes and historical references that they explored in previous printmaking classes. Students will work independently under the supervision of a printmaking faculty member to produce a portfolio of thematically related work. The goal of this course is to prepare students for post-graduate work and/or studies. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PRT 499 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  • Painting (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    PTG 101 - Painting & Drawing I


    This is the first in a sequence of painting courses. As such, it focuses on a rigorous, demonstrated review of observational fundamentals. Vital basic painting techniques, materials, and processes will be introduced, as well as the acquisition of knowledge and critical awareness within the discipline of painting. Students will begin to understand paintings role throughout history and into contemporary fine art practices. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 202 - Painting & Drawing II


    Expanding on the formal introduction in Painting I, students will further refine observational, technical, and critical skills. Projects will negotiate challenges with a view toward increasing two-dimensional complexity, while advancing technique and concept. Abstraction and mark making will be discussed and applied as students begin to develop a personal painterly vocabulary. Students will also explore historical, modern and contemporary painters. Prerequisite: PTG101 Painting I (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 203 - Painting III: The Figure


    This course engages students to apply painting principles to the representation of the human figure. An appreciation of the expressive potential of the human form underscores course lessons in portraiture and in compositions grappling with primary challenges rendering figure/ground. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 303 - Waterbased Media


    This course presents the materials and techniques of water-based media. As such, students will gain technical skill in the manipulation of transparent and opaque processes. Students will acquire knowledge of the expressive potential of the medium, as demonstrated through historical and contemporary methods and works. A traditional academic studio approach will be used with an emphasis on adept handling of water-based media, applied color theory, and continued development of solid drawing skills. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 304 - Painting IV: Landscape Painting


    Analysis of space and organization of composition are just some of the challenges of the landscape painter. This course builds on the students previously acquired painting skills in order to explore the visual culture of landscape traditions in both historical and contemporary contexts. On- and off-site assignments are intended to reflect student knowledge of practical demonstrations and illustrated lectures. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 305 - Painting V:Advanced Painting


    This is an advanced painting course that anticipates independent responsibility within a synthesis of technical and conceptual challenges. A serious review of a students abilities, engagement, and passion will be examined and integrated in the pursuit of highly authoritative personal expression. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 399 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 401/403 - Senior Studio I & II


    The Senior Studio serves as the capstone course. It is an independent, personal pursuit designed to contribute to the creation of an advanced body of thematic work. The course will include directed lectures and critiques to support the critical awareness necessary for the emerging professional artist. Each concentration has established specific objectives beyond the common core for its respective seniors. Students participate in midterm and final group critiques. The course also includes visiting artists and professional presentations. Restricted to Seniors. (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 410 - Internship/Community Based Learning


    Internship/Community Based Learning (3 Credits)
  •  

    PTG 499 - Special Topic


    Special Topic (3 Credits)
  • Science (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    SCI 104 - Human Anatomy for Artists


    This human anatomy course will introduce the students to the structures and functions of human body focusing on the integumentary, skeletal, and muscular systems. The focus will be on how the human body is organized as it applies to the artist through the lens of anatomy and exploring evolutionary events that shaped anatomical changes. The class will use texts, models, and computer animations/interactive programs to explore and identify anatomical features of the human body as well as practice research skills investigating a topic chosen by the student and creating work representing that topic. (3 Credits)
  •  

    SCI 220 - Sustainability


    Few issues are more important than those currently affecting our global environment. This course will introduce the fundamental principles of ecology and use them to explore the theory and practices proposed to create a more sustainability society. We will survey the scientific facts behind todays most critical global environmental issues, including human population growth, natural resources consumption, global climate change, pollution and toxicology, sustainable agriculture and food systems, biodiversity loss, renewable energy, and the state of our oceans. Course format will include lectures, projects, online resources, interactive exercises, independent research, field-trips, and involvement in one or more environmental issues at the local level. Regular small group discussions using the Socratic Method will encourage reflection about the role of science, society, and art in creating a more sustainable world. While scientific in content, this course is designed to deepen participants artistic practice by emphasizing the intersection of art and science. (3 Credits)
  •  

    SCI 306 - Biology & Human Health


    This Contemporary Biology course will introduce the students to the science behind every day biological issues. The class will explore the current scientific research, the political influence and the media pressure around hot topics in Biology and human health, and the ultimate choices that we all face because of them. Topics will include antibiotic resistant diseases, genetically modified food, carcinogenic materials in cosmetics, drinking water safety, genomic testing and the virus threats. (3 Credits)
  •  

    SCI 315 - Botany for the Artist


    This course, emphasizing plant morphology and classical scientific illustration, is designed to deliver the fundamental principles of botany while giving students a deep understanding of plant anatomy as it relates to function and surface form. We will explore a suite of biological themes including evolution, genetics, ecology, anatomy, morphology, taxonomy, and conservation, along with surveying the work of modern and historic botanical illustrators. Course format will include lectures, projects, discussions, interactive exercises, independent research, field trips, and use of online resources. Well-integrated labs will emphasize rigorous scientific observation - akin to artistic observation fine dissection techniques, and the detailed rendering of anatomical features of plant specimens from a number of taxonomic classes. Special Topics, chosen based on student interest, will explore contemporary societal issues; Students will also compile their own pressed plant collection. While scientific in content, this course is designed to deepen participants artistic practice by emphasizing the intersection of art and science. (3 Credits)
  • Sculpture (IA)

    Courses

  •  

    SCU 201 - Sculpture I


    This is an introduction to the development of spatial, tactile and formal perceptions in the exploration of three-dimensional form. This course presents additive and subtractive sculpture techniques. A series of progressive assignments encourage a practical understanding of visual elements, including composition, proportion, line, form, mass and plane. Note that this course is required for Ceramic and Painting concentration students. Prerequisite: Foundations Core (3 Credits)


  •