2017-2018 Graduate and Professional Studies Programs 
    
    Apr 22, 2018  
2017-2018 Graduate and Professional Studies Programs

Graduate and Professional Studies Programs


Accounting


New England College’s Master of Science in Accounting (MSA) is a 40-credit-hour program designed to help student’s expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in taxation, financial reporting, cost accounting, auditing, legal concerns, mergers, and acquisitions. Students will be prepared for careers in auditing and risk management, corporate accounting, management consulting, banking and financial services, governmental and nonprofit organizations, and taxation practices.

Based on the functional, personal and broad business competencies identified by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the MSA program satisfies the 150-hour requirement for the CPA examination in most states. It also helps you prepare for other professional certification programs such as Certified Management Accountant (CMA), or Certified Internal Auditor (CIA).

The MSA degree is also offered with a concentration in Forensic Accounting which is designed for those students interested in fraud prevention or criminal investigation. This concentration helps prepare you for the Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE) designation. 

Faculty in the MSA degree come from a variety of professional and academic backgrounds, and pedagogical emphasis is placed on practical application of knowledge and developing strong professor to student rapport.

Who Should Enroll in the MSA Program?

This degree path is ideal for students wishing to sit for the CPA or enter careers in auditing and risk management, corporate accounting, management consulting, or banking, governmental, and not-for-profit accounting.  NEC Master’s of Science in Accounting is designed to accommodate busy working professionals seeking a “student-centered” touch to complement their education. 

Program Sequence

  • 7 Entry points per year
  • 100% online or on campus (for general MSA degree only - no concentrations offered on-campus)

Career and Professional Development Opportunities

New England College’s Master’s of Science in Accounting degree provides professionals an opportunity to advance in their careers, whether they have prior professional accounting experience or not.  For those who have an undergraduate degree in accounting, NEC’s MS in Accounting will satisfy the requirements to sit for the CPA exam in most states.

Through three concentrations (Forensic Accounting, Banking, and Finance) Students can develop essential skill sets in taxation, financial reporting, cost accounting, auditing, legal concerns, mergers and acquisitions, non-profit management, and banking and financial services.

Learning Outcomes

(adapted from AICPA core competencies):

  • Decision Modeling: consider issues, identify alternatives, choose and implement solutions;
  • Risk Analysis: identify and manage audit risk and understand how business risk affects business strategy;
  • Measurement: use traditional and non-traditional (e.g. quantitative and qualitative) measures that are relevant and reliable;
  • Reporting: communicate clearly and objectively the work done and the resulting findings in accordance with professional standards;
  • Research: access relevant guidance/information, understand it, and apply it;
  • Strategic Thinking: link data, knowledge, and insight together to provide information for decision making;
  • Legal: describe and apply the legal, regulatory, and ethical requirements of the profession.

Note: Students may choose any of the courses listed below, for an MSA with no Concentration (where students define the path that best suits their needs), or they choose a specific Concentration from the list described below.

 

Programs

Major

Courses

Accounting

  • AC 5210 - Managerial Accounting and Finance for Leaders


    This course equips students to more effectively and ethically lead and influence in situations where financial issues play a key role. Students examine the economic concepts, accounting processes and financial tools used by leaders to assess conditions and take action to influence performance. This course serves as an introduction to the concepts and principles of financial management and managerial accounting and will covers financial terms, skills in financial planning, the management of working capital, budgeting, debt and equity financing, developing financial balance sheets and their relationship to leadership and the strategic decision making process. Student will explore the tools available to recognize organizational performance and capital management and its formation and relationship to the financial stability of the organization and decision making process. (4 Credits)
  • AC 5220 - Financial Accounting in Healthcare Organizations


    This course introduces and examines the fundamentals of financial accounting theories and practices and emphasizes asset and liability, measurement and reporting. Topics include: interpreting financial statements, balance sheets, income statements, stockholders’ equity, leases and statement of changes in financial positions and tax accounting. (4 Credits)
  • AC 5230 - Intermediate Accounting I


    This course provides a comprehensive view of financial statements, including balance sheets, income statements, ratio analysis, and cash flow statements. Some discussion of reporting of financial activities such as bonds and corporate debt will be covered, all with consideration of generally accepted accounting practices. To be taken first term in program. (4 Credits)
  • AC 5240 - Cost Accounting


    A study of the concepts, procedures and tools associated with reporting financial data on performance to an organization’s decision-makers. Emphasis is on the tools associated with planning, directing, and controlling an organization’s activities, all with the goal of performance improvement. Topics include activity based costing, earned value management, and budgeting activities. (4 Credits) Can take concurrently with AC5230.
  • AC 5250 - Managerial Accounting


    This course equips students to more effectively and ethically lead and influence in situations where financial issues play a key role. Students examine the economic concepts, accounting processes and financial tools used by leaders to assess conditions and take action to influence performance. This course serves as an introduction to the concepts and principles of managerial accounting and will cover cost accounting systems, budgeting, budget variant analysis, responsibility accounting and decision-making, and their relationship to leadership and the strategic decision making process. (4 Credits)
  • AC 5550 - Federal Taxation


    This course explores corporate and personal income tax laws and their effect on private, public, and non‐profit organizations. Emphasis will be on business strategy and tax considerations. (4 Credits)
  • AC 5620 - Government and Non‐Profit Reporting


    This course covers the environment of government/non‐profit accounting and financial Analysis, budgeting control, revenues, and expenditures, accounting for capital projects, related account groups, and endowment management to include investments, accounting for business type and trustee activities, issues of reporting, disclosure, and non‐profit organizations. Prerequisites: AC 5230   (4 Credits)
  • AC 5640 - Auditing and Attestation


    This course introduces the student to the audit process, with emphasis on the perspective of management in a CPA firm, but with consideration to internal processes. Topics include implementing control procedures and assessments using both the compliance and management methods. Audit planning, staffing and training are considered. Special topics include enterprise risk management and auditing non‐profit and public organizations. Prerequisites: AC 5230   (4 Credits)
  • AC 5660 - Litigation Services, the Role of the Accountant as an Expert


    This course explores the value of the forensic accountant as an expert consultant and expert witness in litigation matters. Damage calculations, business valuations, expert witness reports, expert witness testimony, and alternative dispute resolution are among the topics covered. Specific litigation areas addressed include those involving contract disputes; tort claims; personal injury, wrongful death, and wrongful termination; bankruptcy; claims against accountants; employee fraud; tax fraud; insurance; divorce; and intellectual property. (4 Credits)
  • AC 5730 - Accounting for Mergers and Acquisitions


    This course focuses attention on all key stages of the M&A lifecycle including conception, planning, the first 100 days post merger/acquisition, due diligence of intellectual property (IP), and ongoing evaluation and improvement. Prerequisites: AC 5230   (4 Credits)
  • AC 6120 - Bankruptcy and Reorganization


    Students in this class will review the Federal Bankruptcy Code and its impact on Chapter 11 reorganization.  Focus will be placed on the rights of creditors in bankruptcy, the planning and methods used in Chapter 11 reorganization, and the relationship between federal and state law in instances of bankruptcy.  Students will cover the practical implications of guiding a firm through the reorganization process, including asset sales, debtor-in-possession (DIP) financing, equity spin-offs, buyouts, ESOPs, restructuring of retiree health care/pension plans, and corporate layoff/downsizing programs. Prerequisites: AC 5250   (4 Credits)
  • AC 6230 - Internal Audit & Risk Management


    Using a case‐based approach, this course explores the role of internal audit in developing and maintaining an effective fraud risk management program for an organization. Emphasis is on the value of internal audit as a critical defense against the threat of fraud. Fraud risk factors, fraud schemes and concealment strategies, preventive and detective controls, internal auditing standards, auditing processes and techniques, best practices in fraud risk management, fraud risk assessment, governance, and ethics are among the topics covered. (4 credits)
  • AC 6310 - International Accounting


    The International Accounting course provides an overview of the theoretical and practical challenges posed by accounting in the global environment, creating a platform for understanding accounting issues unique to international business activities. Discussions will cover a range of issues faced by contemporary global entities in the areas of auditing, standards, external financial reporting, financial reporting harmonization and convergence, accounting systems, foreign currency transactions and translations, international financial statement analysis, performance evaluation, changes in price levels, controls, taxes and transfer pricing, as well as ethical, social, legal, and cultural considerations. Prerequisites: AC 5230   (4 Credits)
  • AC 6430 - Performance and Ethical Standards of the Audit Professional


    This course will discuss professional audit standards and standards of quality control adopted by the PCAOB and the AICPA including Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS), procedures for gathering evidence, audit risk assessment, non‐audit engagements, legal requirements and professional ethics. The requirement for auditors to evaluate systems of internal control in a post Sarbanes‐Oxley business environment will be discussed. Different types of audit reports, such as departures from GAAP or going concern opinions, will be covered as well as the various other services auditors can and do perform. Students will have opportunity to consider notable cases and examine how accountants exercise leadership within their organization with respect to ethical behavior. Prerequisites: AC 5640   (4 Credits)
  • AC 6440 - Business Crime and Ethical Behavior


    This course will consider the acts, necessary intent, and defenses related to organizational, occupational, and white collar crimes. The course will review crime prevention, the criminal justice system, and punishment. The code of ethics of the American Institute of Public Accountants (AICPA), the Association of Fraud Examiners (ACFE), and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines will be reviewed. (4 credits)
  • AC 6550 - Federal Tax of Individuals


    This course explores the theory and practice of personal federal income tax and compliance. Students will review topics such as taxable income recognition and characterization, capital gains, and disposition of property and personal exemptions. Prerequisites: AC 5230   (4 Credits)
  • AC 6555 - Federal Tax of Trusts and Estates


    This course explores the theories and practices of the taxation of estates and trusts and how these obligations affect beneficiaries. Students will learn how to prepare Federal Form 1041 and the accompanying schedules. Prerequisites: AC 5230   (4 Credits)
  • AC 6559 - Tax Seminar


    In this case-based course students will review the most recent changes and challenges to the federal tax code. Prerequisites: AC 5230   (4 Credits)
  • AC 6560 - CPA Review Class


    For students in the MSA program NEC offers a 0 credit class to help students prepare for the Certified Public Accountant exam.  Students will have the opportunity to review past exam questions and study potential solutions to these problems in depth.  (0 Credits)
  • AC 6640 - Fraud Risk Management and Interrogation


    This course studies the responsibilities of the  auditor in detecting fraud, focusing on  Statements of Auditing Standards No. 53, 82,  and 99. The roles and responsibilities of the audit  committee, senior management, financial  management, and internal and external auditors  will be reviewed. Securities and Exchange  Commission Staff Accounting Bulletins 99 on  Materiality and 104 on Revenue Recognition  will be covered. Specific fraud audit methods  and checklist will be studied. In addition, students will learn about common techniques used to question individuals involved in fraudulent tax activities. (4 Credits)

Business Administration


New England College’s Master of Business Administration program provides working professionals and recent graduates with the proven leadership skills needed for today’s rapidly changing global environment. This 40‐credit MBA can be completed in two years, part‐time. The course delivery and structure are specifically designed for working professionals to make the most efficient use of time and to optimize the learning experience.

Our MBA carries forward NEC’s legacy of creating well-rounded management professionals. With an emphasis on practical knowledge and skills, students will learn from faculty experts who are active business leaders. Our student-focused curriculum positions graduates to achieve positive career outcomes with a background in strategic thought and analysis, analytical decision-making, leadership theory and practice, and organizational dynamics in management. Students can choose a concentration in a specific field, or can select elective courses from a wide range of options.

The degree is designed to further students’ knowledge of key leadership elements including problem solving, effective communication, motivation of employees, and negotiation. Through the MBA program, students further their career by developing advanced strategic leadership techniques, leadership tools and skills, and a deep understanding of organizational dynamics in management.

Learning Outcomes

MBA Program Outcomes:

  • Effectively demonstrate the ability to communicate through verbal, well‐written professional documentation and reports, and other forms of communication to express ideas clearly, logically and persuasively.
  • Apply management skills and concepts to identify, analyze, and creatively solve complex organizational problems through financial, economic, and organizational constraints.           
  • Demonstrate proficiency in thinking and planning strategically within an organization and all associated stakeholders.           
  • Identify legal and ethical challenges faced by organizations, and develop the ability to confront and address the issues effectively, ethically, and in a socially responsible manner to successfully manage human and material resources.  
  • Understand and apply a broad range of interpersonal skills to effectively lead relationships to individuals, society, and other organizations within team and group projects to optimize performance.
  • Comprehend the challenges and opportunities of working effectively with other people in a diverse environment, while displaying an understanding of the culturally and ethnically diverse nature of this changing workforce. 
  • Apply necessary leadership skills required for managing change, organizational design and performance, through delegating, empowering and creating an environment that supports life-long learning. 

Programs

Major

Courses

Business Administration

Please note: specific courses offered in any academic year are subject to changes depending on enrollment and academic needs.

 

  • BU 2110 - Quantitative Methods


    This introductory course in quantitative analysis focuses on applications in service, manufacturing, and not‐for‐profit organizations. Topics include basic descriptive statistics, expected value, sampling, inference, regression analysis, forecasting, scheduling, linear programming and project management. Prerequisites: MT 1010 or adequate score on MPT. (4 Credits)
  • BU 2210 - Financial Accounting


    This course introduces the generally accepted principles that govern an entity’s financial accounting system and the income statement and balance sheet that are the principal end products of the system. Students learn how accounting information is used to evaluate the performance and financial status of an organization, both by managers within the organization and by shareholders, lenders, and other outside parties. (4 Credits)
  • BU 2220 - Management Accounting


    This course shows students how to generate information needed to help managers achieve goals and objectives. Students determine prices for products and services, decide whether or not to acquire equipment, prepare budgets, compare actual performance to budgets, decide what information is relevant to decisions, allocate costs to various activities in the organization and generate information in support of managerial decisions. Students receive instruction in a computer spreadsheet program and use spreadsheets to facilitate decision making. (4 Credits)

Digital Social Media

  • DSM 5130 - Psychology of Social Media


    The effectiveness of digital and social media depends on developing networks of meaning as well as markets, and in order to market products and services or influence opinions effectively, it is essential to get to know the audience first. By understanding the motivation and behavior of various publics, leaders can make effective decisions regarding products, price promotion and distribution, or messaging in order to improve communication campaigns and support the overall strategic planning of an organization. Topics such as the factors that influence consumer behavior, cultural influences, social stratification, motivation and personality, purchase behavior, and e‐Consumer behavior will be examined in this course. (4 Credits)
  • DSM 5310 - Social Media, Crowdsourcing, and Brand Development


    This course examines the emergence of search engines, social media and “collective intelligence” technologies such as crowdsourcing, which have drastically changed the business landscape in many industries. Some traditional business models are now outdated, others have been deeply transformed, and many new models are emerging based on the unprecedented access to vast amounts of information enjoyed by the participants in today’s markets. This course is designed to help students enhance skills in market research and develop their knowledge of how to apply digital media such as the web, email, mobile applications, and social networking sites in order to market products and services, influence consumer or audience behavior, and cultivate constituent affinity and action. (4 Credits)
  • DSM 6310 - Trends in Digital and Social Media


    This course examines the digital and social media technologies that drive much of our communication, entertainment, business, and social lives today, exploring both the uses of those technologies and the critical responses to them. Uses of digital and social media in business, advocacy, community/constituent development, and other professional communications contexts will be explored. (4 Credits)

Finance

  • FI 5330 - Regulatory Compliance


    As regulatory and compliance issues continue to evolve over the last decade, it is imperative that managers and investors stay informed on federal securities laws and related regulations.  In this class students will receive and overview of the theoretical basis and practical implications of these laws and regulations, with a focus on compliance, reporting, data protection, and how these laws impact financial markets both domestically and globally.   (4 Credits)
  • FI 6210 - Investment Banking


    In this survey course students will learn essential concepts in investment banking with a focus on excel based cash flow modeling and valuation for transactions in private equity, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, and IPOs.  In addition to modeling and valuation methodologies, students will review how monetary and fiscal policy impact the Investment Banking sector.  Prerequisites: FI 6310   (4 Credits)
  • FI 6270 - Loan Analysis and Risk Management


    This class introduces students to the process of loan analysis.  Students will learn how to review financial statements and interpret a firm’s cash flow for the purpose of performing an accurate risk assessment and packaging an appropriate loan structure.  In addition to understanding loan packaging, students will also learn how to interpret and control market, credit, operational, and regulatory risk.   (4 credits)
  • FI 6310 - Finance for Leaders


    In this course students will explore the tools available to recognize capital management and its formation and relationship to the financial stability of the organization and decision making process. Emphasis is placed on developing a core set of skills in financial modeling, debt and equity issues, valuation, mergers and acquisitions, financial planning, risk management, financial reporting and analysis, and taxation. (4 credits)
  • FI 6350 - International Finance


    This comprehensive class will review how corporations and investors engage in global financial markets.  Students will cover principle concepts like market efficiency, arbitrage, and pricing models, and develop skills in navigating foreign exchange, derivatives, equity, and commodity markets. Prerequisites: FI 6310   (4 Credits)
  • FI 6620 - Portfolio Management


    Students will explore modern theories behind managing investment portfolios that maximize financial returns against risk tolerance.  Students will learn how to independently analyze the strengths and weaknesses between different asset allocations, including debt and equity, domestic and international markets, conservative and aggressive approaches, and the impact that Macroeconomic effects such as inflation, interest rates, and Federal Reserve policy have on risk profiles.  Prerequisites: FI 6310   (4 Credits)

Clinical Mental Health Counseling


The 60‐credit MS degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is a licensure‐tract degree and must comply with the curriculum requirements mandated by the State of New Hampshire. Completion of the degree requires nearly two years of continuous study and the completion of a 700 hour internship. Minimally, 300 of those 700 hours must be direct, clinical client activity. There will be a faculty assessment, with final approval from the Program Director, within the first year of the program regarding student readiness for placement in clinical internship. Students must be in good academic standing to begin internship. The degree qualifies an NEC graduate to apply for candidacy as a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor (LCMHC) or an equivalent mental health provider in most other states. Students from neighboring states are responsible for supplementing or adapting the curriculum to meet the requirements in those states where they intend to practice. Students are required to become a member of the American Mental Health Counselor Association, or the NH branch, within the first term. Students will also be required to purchase student liability insurance prior to beginning internship placement. Students will be required to successfully complete a capstone project, as a component of the research Methods course, to demonstrate attainment of competency in core professional skills. Courses are intended to be sequential, and students need permission from the Program Director to alter their course of completion, and design an approved educational plan. The Clinical Mental Health Couseling program reflects the 2016 CACREP standards, as a CACREP curriculum - equivalent degree, containing inclusion of foundations, contextual dimensions & practice.

Learning Outcomes for Clinical Mental Health Counseling

As a result of participating in this program, students will:

  • Demonstrate an ability to be self‐reflective and engaging in personal awareness and growth regarding their intra‐ and interpersonal processes;
  • Understand and incorporate an identity as a professional counselor;
  • Demonstrate the ability to develop helping relationships with diverse populations and demonstrate sensitivity and competency in skills in cultural diversity;
  • Understand and demonstrate developmentally appropriate individual counseling, group counseling, and systemic interventions;
  • Demonstrate the ability to understand concepts and skills relating to career interventions;
  • Evidence skills in effective written and oral communication and clinical documentation, including those most utilized in the mental health counseling field;
  • Demonstrate technological competence to meet the needs of course work and employment in the field of counseling;
  • Understand and apply ethical reasoning and decision making to dilemmas faced by professional counselors, and demonstrate understanding of common legal issues within the field;
  • Show leadership and advocacy skills in supporting both individual and systemic change;
  • Understand and demonstrate appropriate assessment techniques, considering presenting problem, developmental, cognitive and cultural perspectives;
  • Identify contemporary issues in the human services field and their impact on clients, consumers, organizations, and human service providers;
  • Research and evaluate the effectiveness of counseling and systemic interventions and service programs;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of research methods for clinicians including completing an active research project as a capstone;
  • Demonstrate acquired fund of knowledge and clinical skills through a successful internship placement of at a minimum of 700 hours, with at least 300 of those hours requiring direct, clinical client activity.

Although the 36‐credit M.S. in Human Services is not designed to meet licensure requirements for counseling professions, graduates of this program are prepared for leadership positions in social services, education, behavioral health management, program is designed for learners within the counseling, psychology, or related human services fields who wish to pursue careers in private or public human services or counseling settings. Core courses provide knowledge in the discipline, while electives provide an examination of contemporary issues that allow the student to focus on human services populations and/or areas of interest in supportive counseling and leadership/management. Students will be required to successfully complete a capstone project, to demonstrate attainment of competency of core professional skills, as a requirement of graduation.

For more information:

graduateadmission@nec.edu or 603.428.2252
Course sequence, dates & location are subject to change.

Learning Outcomes for MS in Human Services

As a result of participating in this program, students will:

  • Understand core concepts of human development, Abnormal Psychology/Psychopathology, and emotional and behavioral functioning;
  • Identify contemporary issues in the human services field and their impact on clients, consumers, organizations, and human service providers;
  • Attain the necessary skills to communicate in an effective and professional manner;
  • Understand historical and contemporary ethical concepts and theories within the field of human services;
  • Understand and explore the influence of personal history and values on the role as a human service provider;
  • Demonstrate problem‐solving, critical and analytic skills utilized within human services and apply organizational and leadership skills through the completion and presentation of a final project.

Programs

Major

Certificate

Courses

Psychology

  • PS 5000 - Orientation Seminar (CMHC)


    This seminar is designed to orient new students to the field of mental health and human services and the requirements and expectations of licensed mental health practitioners in New Hampshire and New England. Students will also spend time designing their course of study at New England College with the guidance of the Program Director. Students will gain a working understanding of the history of the Mental Health Counseling field and understand the professional specificities re: competencies, scope of service and become familiar with professional guilds, certification and licensure processes. (0 credits)
  • PS 5000 - Orientation Seminar (HU S)


    This seminar is designed to orient new students to the field of mental health and human services and the requirements and expectations of licensed mental health practitioners in New Hampshire and New England. Students will also spend time designing their course of study at New England College with the guidance of the Program Director. Students will gain a working understanding of the history of the Mental Health Counseling field and understand the professional specificities re: competencies, scope of service and become familiar with professional guilds, certification and licensure processes. (4 credits)
  • PS 5140 - Human Growth and Development (CMHC)


    Building on a conceptual foundation of Piaget and Erickson, this course focuses on the application of contemporary thinking in the field. It considers human development from adolescence through late adulthood. Topics to be covered include heredity, environmental factors, and cognitive, emotional, physical, and psychosocial aspects of the developmental process. Current research will be examined and its applicability to treatment will be discussed. (3 credits)
  • PS 5140 - Human Growth and Development (HU S)


    Building on a conceptual foundation of Piaget and Erickson, this course focuses on the application of contemporary thinking in the field. It considers human development from adolescence through late adulthood. Topics to be covered include heredity, environmental factors, and cognitive, emotional, physical, and psychosocial aspects of the developmental process. Current research will be examined and its applicability to treatment will be discussed. (3 credits)
  • PS 5210 - Abnormal Psychology/Psychopathology (CMHC)


    Based on the DSM5 , this course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment methods associated with psychopathology. Students will gain an understanding of the social implications of psychiatric diagnosis, recovery, and stigma commonly associated with mental illness. The clinical application of these principles will be explored through case studies, role‐play, and class discussions. (3 credits)
  • PS 5210 - Abnormal Psychology/Psychopathology (HU S)


    Based on the DSM‐IV and the emerging DSM5 , this course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment methods associated with psychopathology. Students will gain an understanding of the social implications of psychiatric diagnosis, recovery, and stigma commonly associated with mental illness. The clinical application of these principles will be explored through case studies, role‐play, and class discussions. (3 credits)
  • PS 5510 - Clinical Counseling Theories (CMHC)


    Theoretical and practical foundations of the psychotherapeutic process are presented in this course. Approaches to counseling will be explored with the primary focus on the brief treatment model emphasizing evidence-based and outcome‐based interventions. Students will learn to establish and maintain the therapeutic frame, rapport, assess needs, and develop treatment plans utilizing various theoretical frameworks through role play, case presentations and discussion. The major historical theories will be reviewed, with attention being brought to those theories most relevant in the contemporary field. (3 credits)
  • PS 5510 - Clinical Counseling Theories (HU S)


    Theoretical and practical foundations of the psychotherapeutic process are presented in this course. Approaches to counseling will be explored with the primary focus on the brief treatment model emphasizing evidence-based and outcome‐based interventions. Students will learn to establish and maintain the therapeutic frame, rapport, assess needs, and develop treatment plans utilizing various theoretical frameworks through role play, case presentations and discussion. The major historical theories will be reviewed, with attention being brought to those theories most relevant in the contemporary field. (3 credits)
  • PS 5520 - Clinical Counseling Techniques (CMHC)


    This course is a continuation of Clinical Counseling Theories. Student will develop the skills to effectively assess, design, implement, and evaluate counseling strategies that help the client enhance functioning in targeted areas. Emphases will be placed on the interpersonal dynamics inherent in the process, ethical issues, and technique, through role play, demonstration, case presentations and discussion. (3 credits)
  • PS 5520 - Clinical Counseling Techniques (HU S)


    This course is a continuation of Clinical Counseling Theories. Student will develop the skills to effectively assess, design, implement, and evaluate counseling strategies that help the client enhance functioning in targeted areas. Emphases will be placed on the interpersonal dynamics inherent in the process, ethical issues, and technique, through role play, demonstration, case presentations and discussion. (3 credits)
  • PS 5530 - Group Therapy (CMHC)


    Students will develop a thorough understanding of the theory and method of group therapy. The student will learn to think and intervene systemically in order to facilitate effective positive change in the individual through group dynamics. The ethical and professional issues inherent in this modality will be discussed. This course will include an experiential component as a vehicle for students to understand and demonstrate group dynamics within the classroom. (3 credits)
  • PS 5530 - Group Therapy (HU S)


    Students will develop a thorough understanding of the theory and method of group therapy. The student will learn to think and intervene systemically in order to facilitate effective positive change in the individual through group dynamics. The ethical and professional issues inherent in this modality will be discussed. This course will include an experiential component as a vehicle for students to understand and demonstrate group dynamics within the classroom. (3 credits)
  • PS 5910 - Professional Orientation & Ethics of Mental Health Counseling (CMHC)


    This course will help students explore the relationship between the law, and the framework of ethics, and human service and mental health organizations. Legal duties and the rights of clients and providers will be discussed. The course will also provide a forum for the exploration and analysis of ethical questions and value dilemmas encountered by managers and clinicians in mental health and human services. Continuing to build on concepts presented in Orientation Seminar, students will continue development of their professional identity as a clinical mental health counselor trainee, understanding the history of the Mental Health Counseling field and understand the professional specificities re: competencies and the scope of service of the profession. Students will become familiar with professional guilds, certification and licensure processes. (3 credits)
  • PS 5910 - Professional Orientation & Ethics of Mental Health Counseling (HU S)


    This course will help students explore the relationship between the law, and the framework of ethics, and human service and mental health organizations. Legal duties and the rights of clients and providers will be discussed. The course will also provide a forum for the exploration and analysis of ethical questions and value dilemmas encountered by managers and clinicians in mental health and human services. Continuing to build on concepts presented in Orientation Seminar, students will continue development of their professional identity as a clinical mental health counselor trainee, understanding the history of the Mental Health Counseling field and understand the professional specificities re: competencies and the scope of service of the profession. Students will become familiar with professional guilds, certification and licensure processes. (3 credits)
  • PS 5920 - Testing and Assessment (CMHC)


    Designed as a practical introduction to psychological testing and assessment, this course covers the basics in psychological assessment including statistical concepts used in testing, as well as test development, administration, scoring, and interpretation. Topics include intelligence, achievement, neuropsychological assessment, objective and projective personality testing, and testing of ability, aptitude, and attitudes. The course is designed to enable students to become competent and critical readers of testing data and research, to improve their knowledge of referral options, and to integrate testing data in treatment planning and therapy. (3 credits)
  • PS 5920 - Testing and Assessment (HU S)


    Designed as a practical introduction to psychological testing and assessment, this course covers the basics in psychological assessment including statistical concepts used in testing, as well as test development, administration, scoring, and interpretation. Topics include intelligence, achievement, neuropsychological assessment, objective and projective personality testing, and testing of ability, aptitude, and attitudes. The course is designed to enable students to become competent and critical readers of testing data and research, to improve their knowledge of referral options, and to integrate testing data in treatment planning and therapy. (3 credits)
  • PS 6120 - Research Methods (CMHC)


    This course provides students with a strong understanding of the importance of research within the counseling and human service profession as well as the ability to critically examine related research literature.  Students develop an appreciation for the nature of evidence based practice as well as the ability to identify appropriate epistemological approaches to address research questions and design research proposals as well as utilize outcome measures.  Data analysis strategies, both quantitative and qualitative are also explored in relation to program evaluation and research findings.  Ethical and cultural considerations in the development and implementation of primary research as well as program evaluation strategies are explored. (2 credits)
  • PS 6120 - Research Methods (HU S)


    The elements of research design and basic qualitative and quantitative methods will be studied in the context of community mental health practice and programs. Issues related to research problem formulation, project feasibility, ethics, and presentation of data and writing will also be addressed. Students will develop theoretical bases and techniques for conducting their own research. Mental Health Counseling students will demonstrate proficiency by completing and presenting a Capstone project as a component of this course. (2 credits)
  • PS 6170 - Substance Use and Addiction in the Counseling Field (CMHC)


    This course is designed to provide mental health counselor and human services students with an overview of substances abuse and dependency. This course examines the various etiological factors that contribute to Substance Use and dependence, including neurobiological, genetic, psychological, sociocultural, environmental, spiritual, and contextual factors. Emphasis will be placed on a bio psychosocial model, highlighting the inter‐relationship between such factors. Special emphasis will be placed on comorbid disorders, differential diagnostic issues, and the various methods used to evaluate substance use problems. Historical & contemporary treatment modalities will be reviewed, including detoxification, self‐help philosophies, assessment techniques, individual, group and family modalities, dynamics of motivation, and relapse prevention. An introduction to Motivational Interviewing will be included. Barriers to effective treatment will also be discussed. This course examines the various aspects of professional practice, including case management functions, record keeping, report writing, consent to treatment, confidentiality and disclosure. (3 credits)
  • PS 6170 - Substance Use and Addiction in the Counseling Field (HU S)


    This course is designed to provide mental health counselor and human services students with an overview of substances abuse and dependency. This course examines the various etiological factors that contribute to Substance Use and dependence, including neurobiological, genetic, psychological, sociocultural, environmental, spiritual, and contextual factors. Emphasis will be placed on a bio psychosocial model, highlighting the inter‐relationship between such factors. Special emphasis will be placed on comorbid disorders, differential diagnostic issues, and the various methods used to evaluate substance use problems. Historical & contemporary treatment modalities will be reviewed, including detoxification, self‐help philosophies, assessment techniques, individual, group and family modalities, dynamics of motivation, and relapse prevention. An introduction to Motivational Interviewing will be included. Barriers to effective treatment will also be discussed. This course examines the various aspects of professional practice, including case management functions, record keeping, report writing, consent to treatment, confidentiality and disclosure. (3 credits)
  • PS 6180 - Program Planning and Evaluation (CMHC)


    It is essential for practitioners to determine whether the mental health and human services they are providing really help the people they are intended to serve. Students will develop skills in the areas of program evaluation, needs assessment and outcome measurement. They will learn the most effective tools and tasks associated with examining, appraising, analyzing and demonstrating program performance. (3 credits)
  • PS 6180 - Program Planning and Evaluation (HU S)


    It is essential for practitioners to determine whether the mental health and human services they are providing really help the people they are intended to serve. Students will develop skills in the areas of program evaluation, needs assessment and outcome measurement. They will learn the most effective tools and tasks associated with examining, appraising, analyzing and demonstrating program performance. (3 credits)
  • PS 6190 - Social & Cultural Foundations in Mental Health (CMHC)


    This course is designed to promote development of a theoretical and practical framework for effective delivery of mental health and human services within the context of multicultural and pluralistic characteristics within and among diverse groups. In addition to exploring the dynamics cultural diversity has on helping relationships, this course will examine the relationship that ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, minority status, aging, and disability has on the therapeutic process. Students will identify the impact of privilege and power as well as practice‐based strategies that enhance the mental health counselor’s capacity to work effectively with culturally diverse clients.  Building awareness of one’s own cultural lens and the impact this has on one’s mental health counseling practice will also be emphasized. (3 credits)
  • PS 6190 - Social & Cultural Foundations in Mental Health (HU S)


    This course is designed to promote development of a theoretical and practical framework for effective delivery of mental health and human services within the context of multiculturalism. In addition to exploring the effects cultural diversity has on helping relationships, this course will examine the relationship that ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, minority status, aging, and disability in understanding multicultural factors. Students will identify practice‐based strategies that address cultural challenges to service delivery including the impact of individual prejudices and discrimination. Developing recognition of one’s own cultural development and the impact that has upon practice will be emphasized. (3 credits)
  • PS 6220 - Graduate Capstone


    Graduate Capstone includes the implementation of the research proposal developed during the Research Methods course.  MS in CMHC students conduct primary research in an area of clinical mental health counseling.  HS students also utilize this time to implement the proposal developed during the Research Methods course addressing a substantive issue confronting the human service and helping profession.  Both CMHC and HS student’s work culminate in a Capstone Paper and presentation before a faculty panel. (2 Credits)
  • PS 6350 - Career & Lifestyle Development (CMHC)


    Theories and stages of Career & Lifestyle Development will serve as the foundation for an exploration of life planning and career development. This course explores in depth tools for assessing client abilities, interests, values, personality and other factors that contribute to career development.  In addition students gain an understanding of as well as develop practice skills in the area of career development program planning, strategies for client skill development and advocacy to include the effective use of labor market information resources, technology and information systems.  Ethical and cultural strategies for effective career development will also be explored. (3 credits)
  • PS 6350 - Career & Lifestyle Development (HU S)


    Theories and stages of Career & Lifestyle Development will serve as the foundation for an exploration of life planning and career development. Career planning will be considered as a process of continuous self- assessment, careful selection, skill development, goal setting, and decision-making. (3 credits)
  • PS 6400 - Treatment Modalities and Evidence Based Practices for Treatment & Recovery


    This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of key clinical counseling theories and techniques for the effective treatment of individuals with alcohol and other substance abuse disorders.  The course explores various evidence based treatment modalities such as Motivational Interviewing, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Enhancement Therapy.  Students gain an understanding of the rational for using one approach over another as well as the treatment modalities indicated based on the client’s clinical profile and the nature of their substance abuse and addiction. (3 credits)
  • PS 6500 - Core Functions for Effective Alcohol and other Drug Abuse Counselors


    This course provides the theoretical and practice based exposure to the 12 core functions for effective alcohol and other drug counseling.  Students work with the faculty to fully understand the scope of each core function while working from a practice based approach to integrate key theoretical constructs in support of counselor efficacy.  Theory and practice related considerations form the basis for fully exploring each of the core function. (3 credits)
  • PS 6600 - Family Systems in Addiction Counseling


    This course explores the impact of addiction from a family systems perspective. The cultural context in familial relations informs this exploration providing a lens for carefully considering the implications for addressing for the given family system. The use of structural family therapy as an intervention and support for substance abuse treatment as well as the family dynamics present both in addiction and in recovery. (2 credits)
  • PS 6700 - Neurobiology, Psychopathology for Addiction Counseling


    This course delves into the neurobiology of addiction exploring in depth what is known about the pathways of addiction that are the result of scientific research.  Understanding the neurobiology of addiction is central to the development of practice and policy necessary to effectively treat substance use disorders.  Students develop understanding of research into the brain as well as ways in which our cultural understanding of addiction can cause barriers to effective treatment strategies. (2 credits)
  • PS 6910 - Crisis Intervention (CMHC)


    Focusing on the growing need for skills in crisis management, this course will help students build competency in the handling of emergency or crisis situations in the field of mental health and human service. Students will learn skills in crisis intervention, as well as legal and ethical issues specific to the area of emergency service. Traditional techniques as well as Psychological First Aid will be covered, with discussion regarding crisis intervention occurring in trauma related situations. (3 credits)
  • PS 6910 - Crisis Intervention (HU S)


    Focusing on the growing need for skills in crisis management, this course will help students build competency in the handling of emergency or crisis situations in the field of mental health and human service. Students will learn skills in crisis intervention, as well as legal and ethical issues specific to the area of emergency service. Traditional techniques as well as Psychological First Aid will be covered, with discussion regarding crisis intervention occurring in trauma related situations. (3 credits)
  • PS 6960 - Internship Seminar (CMHC)


    300 hours that is achieved during any of the three existing internship courses within the CMHC program.  These hours are used to help the student achieve the requisite internship hours.  Internships and supervision are adapted within this course to focus treatment for addiction.  Students may take this course at during any semester during the certificate program in order to align with field placement sites. Prerequisites: Students must be in good academic standing to enroll in Internship Seminar, and must have completed previously offered clinical courses in year one. (5 credits)
  • PS 6960 PS 6970 & PS 6980 - Internship Seminar I (HU S)


    This course is intended to facilitate students’ development during the completion of their Master’s level 700 hour clinical internship requirement (300 face‐to‐face direct clinical client contact hours are required for completion). It is designed to support the direct internship clinical experience of the internship placement. This will occur via feedback & discussion with peers and faculty in a small group format on a regular basis, as well as through the texts and supplemental articles provided by the instructor and class. Students will demonstrate their internship experience and skills by discussion, audio & videotaping, journaling, periodic written assignments and the completion of a final project. By the end of this seminar, students will be able to state that they have experienced an increase in their theoretical framework and will demonstrate an understanding and utilization of concepts concerning assessment, treatment planning, counseling, and professional and ethical issues. Students will gain an awareness of the use of self in counseling and the implications of this, and will be able to identify the next steps for themselves along the road of continued professional growth. Prerequisites: Students must be in good academic standing to enroll in Internship Seminar, and must have completed previously offered clinical courses in year one. (5 credits)
  • PS 6970 - Internship Seminar II (CMHC)


    This course is intended to facilitate students’ development during the completion of their Master’s level 700 hour clinical internship requirement (300 face‐to‐face direct clinical client contact hours are required for completion). It is designed to support the direct internship clinical experience of the internship placement. This will occur via feedback & discussion with peers and faculty in a small group format on a regular basis, as well as through the texts and supplemental articles provided by the instructor and class. Students will demonstrate their internship experience and skills by discussion, audio & videotaping, journaling, periodic written assignments and the completion of a final project. By the end of this seminar, students will be able to state that they have experienced an increase in their theoretical framework and will demonstrate an understanding and utilization of concepts concerning assessment, treatment planning, counseling, and professional and ethical issues. Students will gain an awareness of the use of self in counseling and the implications of this, and will be able to identify the next steps for themselves along the road of continued professional growth. (5 credits)
  • PS 6970 - Internship Seminar II (HU S)


    This course is intended to facilitate students’ development during the completion of their Master’s level 700 hour clinical internship requirement (300 face‐to‐face direct clinical client contact hours are required for completion). It is designed to support the direct internship clinical experience of the internship placement. This will occur via feedback & discussion with peers and faculty in a small group format on a regular basis, as well as through the texts and supplemental articles provided by the instructor and class. Students will demonstrate their internship experience and skills by discussion, audio & videotaping, journaling, periodic written assignments and the completion of a final project. By the end of this seminar, students will be able to state that they have experienced an increase in their theoretical framework and will demonstrate an understanding and utilization of concepts concerning assessment, treatment planning, counseling, and professional and ethical issues. Students will gain an awareness of the use of self in counseling and the implications of this, and will be able to identify the next steps for themselves along the road of continued professional growth. (5 credits)
  • PS 6980 - Internship Seminar III (CMHC)


    This course is intended to facilitate students’ development during the completion of their Master’s level 700 hour clinical internship requirement (300 face‐to‐face direct clinical client contact hours are required for completion). It is designed to support the direct internship clinical experience of the internship placement. This will occur via feedback & discussion with peers and faculty in a small group format on a regular basis, as well as through the texts and supplemental articles provided by the instructor and class. Students will demonstrate their internship experience and skills by discussion, audio & videotaping, journaling, periodic written assignments and the completion of a final project. By the end of this seminar, students will be able to state that they have experienced an increase in their theoretical framework and will demonstrate an understanding and utilization of concepts concerning assessment, treatment planning, counseling, and professional and ethical issues. Students will gain an awareness of the use of self in counseling and the implications of this, and will be able to identify the next steps for themselves along the road of continued professional growth. (5 credits)
  • PS 6980 - Internship Seminar III (HU S)


    This course is intended to facilitate students’ development during the completion of their Master’s level 700 hour clinical internship requirement (300 face‐to‐face direct clinical client contact hours are required for completion). It is designed to support the direct internship clinical experience of the internship placement. This will occur via feedback & discussion with peers and faculty in a small group format on a regular basis, as well as through the texts and supplemental articles provided by the instructor and class. Students will demonstrate their internship experience and skills by discussion, audio & videotaping, journaling, periodic written assignments and the completion of a final project. By the end of this seminar, students will be able to state that they have experienced an increase in their theoretical framework and will demonstrate an understanding and utilization of concepts concerning assessment, treatment planning, counseling, and professional and ethical issues. Students will gain an awareness of the use of self in counseling and the implications of this, and will be able to identify the next steps for themselves along the road of continued professional growth. (5 credits)
  • PS 7010 - Family Systems Therapy


    This course will introduce students to Family Systems Theory from both a theoretical and practical framework. Family Systems psychotherapy focuses on the family, rather than a single individual, as the source of presenting issues family therapists challenge communication styles, disrupt ineffective family dynamics, identify and develop strengths, and challenge defense conceptions in order to harmonize relationships among all members and within each member. The course is designed so that students will have experience with the clinical application of family systems therapy, through discussion and role play. (3 credits)
  • PS 7010 - Family Systems Therapy (CMHC)


    This course will introduce students to Family Systems Theory from both a theoretical and practical framework. Family Systems psychotherapy focuses on the family, rather than a single individual, as the source of presenting issues family therapists challenge communication styles, disrupt ineffective family dynamics, identify and develop strengths, and challenge defense conceptions in order to harmonize relationships among all members and within each member. The course is designed so that students will have experience with the clinical application of family systems therapy, through discussion and role play. (3 credits)

Computer Information Systems

The Master of Science in Computer Information Systems is designed for students seeking to combine the development of technical competence in information systems with gaining knowledge and furthering skills in managerial and organizational areas. Graduates of this program will be able to work in a variety of fields to maximize state of the art information system tools and techniques to promote organizational success.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students who complete New England College’s Master of Science in Computer Information Systems will be able to:

  • Apply communication, teamwork, and leadership skills to translate technical information that will help align computer information systems and tools with organizational goals.
  • Analyze technical aspects of IT projects and apply project management strategies to meet business needs and organizational goals.
  • Apply IT methods and tools to the development of applications and administration of computing systems, as well as to the adoption of new technologies in the organization.
  • Identify information tools and technologies that have strategic value for the organization, and manage the implementation of those technologies.

Programs

Major

Courses

Computer Information Systems

  • CT 5000 - Graduate & Professional Skills Development


    The course introduces students to the tools needed to complete an advanced degree in Computer Information Systems. In addition, it reviews the basic skills required to participate successfully in an intercultural, professional IT environment. Major topics include: techniques for conducting scholarly research, review of basic CIS technical tools including web design and deployment, research paper methodology, job procurement and resume preparation, employment interviewing techniques, and a review of the training and preparation that is essential for a career in the high tech sector. (4 credits)
  • CT 5120 - Organizational Leadership in Technology


    This course combines theory and practice by encouraging students to learn traditional and contemporary leadership theories and apply them to the analysis of the behavior of leaders, colleagues, and subordinates in a technological environment.  Through a variety of readings, cases, and exercises, students will examine numerous effective leadership models.  Topics include the evolution of leadership; the special qualities of leadership appropriate to information technology, the leadership roles of strategy, vision and transformational change; the development of leaders; the leadership responsibilities of creating effective teams, organizations and cultures; the exploration of different leadership styles; the application of leadership skills required for successful IT project management, and current popular approaches to leadership theory. (4 Credits)
  • CT 5170 - E-Commerce Technology


    This course provides students with an understanding of the IT and software infrastructure required to build effective e-commerce platforms.  Students will develop a foundation in basic programming, database technologies, and software engineering.  Students will explore changing trends and emerging technologies within the field of e-commerce, with an emphasis on tools used in integrating an organization’s front-end marketing with the back-end supply chain. (4 Credits)
  • CT 5230 - Cloud Computing Concepts


    This course provides the basic skills required to analyze, design, and implement cloud-based solutions in a multitude of organizational structures. It focuses on the integration of scalable, reliable platforms, utilizing such fundamental concepts as: private vs. public clouds, migration, virtualization, debugging, development and performance metrics, and disaster recovery. Additional tools and topics, such as the use of Amazon Web Servers, are also explored. (4 Credits)
  • CT 5320 - Data Mining for the Intelligent Business


    Business Intelligence depends on the quality of processes and structures for data storage, retrieval, and analysis. In this course, students will study the theory of operational database design and implementation, including concepts of normalization, database queries and database application development, text analytics and big data harvesting. The course will then extend to include the concepts of data mining from the perspective of the web environment, with a particular focus on the quality of data. Students will be encouraged to find the patterns in the data and to prepare reports and presentations describing the implications of their findings. (4 Credits)
  • CT 5510 - Java - Introduction to Object Oriented Programming


    Object Oriented programming is an essential skill for those students wishing to work with application development and maintenance.  This class is an introduction to Java, among the most popular object based languages in use today.  It presents the fundamental design principles of modularity and abstraction as applied to current programming practices in computer science. Students will work with object oriented components and characteristics as they write, debug, execute and test Java applets and applications. Topics to include: data types, classes, inheritance, arrays, overloading and exception processing. A variety of Java development environments will be considered. (4 Credits)
  • CT 5610 - Database Design


    This course introduces database design and creation. Emphasis is on data dictionaries, normalization, data integrity, data modeling, and creation of simple tables, queries, reports, and forms. Students should be able to design and implement normalized database structures by creating database tables, queries, reports, and forms. Students will use MS Access and MS SQL Server and the SQL programming language. They will also work with Visio to create database diagrams. (4 Credits)
  • CT 5630 - Pega Platform and Applications


    An introduction to the automating of business processes using the Pega platform. Review the value of using the Pega platform and describes Pega’s industry-specific applications. Defines case life cycle management application design and explains how Pega Express build functional applications. (4 credits)
  • CT 5750 - Web Applications and Web Design Development


    This course provides an introduction to web-based applications development. Topics include the creation of web sites using web development software and the architectural elements of programming web sites that produce dynamic content. Students will gain familiarity with a variety of programming languages and tools, and will learn methods and tools that are used in the process of developing web-based applications. (4 Credits)
  • CT 5901 - Computer Information Systems On-Site Internship


    Students apply knowledge and theories gained in class to real world business situations. Students work with co-operating employers on a part-time basis to achieve specific predetermined academic objectives. This internship is designed for the student to work in an office setting rather than in a remote project environment. Contract required. (Variable Credits 1-2) May be repeated using different number: CT 5902 - 5904
  • CT 5990 - Basics of Web Graphics & Animations


    A course highlighting the special requirements related to the use of graphics in a web environment. Utilizing open source tools such as Gimp and Inkscape, students learn the appropriate application of individual graphic types and the techniques required to create custom web animations. The class reviews the newest graphic types available through HTML5 and CSS3 and the methods and techniques available to manipulate those images on multiple platforms through web scripting methods. Topics include: image file characteristics, bitmap and vector graphics, gif animation, CANVAS tag and SVG images, and issues related to mobile applications. Not offered to students who have CT5990 Web Graphics 4 credit course. (2 Credits)
  • CT 6050 - Mobile Web Development


    A broad introduction into the development of mobile web sites and applications. This investigation provides the basic programming skills required to design and implement quality websites on a variety of mobile platforms. Students will learn to distinguish between mobile websites and mobile web applications and to create mobile websites using tools such as HTML5 and JQuery Mobile. The class will also explore the basics of creating multi-platform web hybrid applications using Apache Cordova (PhoneGap). (4 Credits)
  • CT 6110 - IT Project Management


    This course will examine various techniques used to manage complex projects in the context of overall organizational goals and strategy. The course will examine the roles of team members as well as the impact of team building, planning, scope management, time management, and budgetary constraints. A number to technical tools, e.g. GANTT and PERT charting will be examined. Prerequisites: CT2430 (4 Credits)
  • CT 6111 - Computer Security


    Cybersecurity is a growing field that deals with threats to hardware and software in both public and private environments. This course is designed to prepare the software professional for a wide range of security challenges, including reviews of:  cryptography, web security, network attacks, malware, operating systems, cloud processing and physical security. A wide range of security tools and procedures will be considered. (4 Credits)
  • CT 6220 - Android Development and Programming


    This course deals with developing and programming applications using Android, the world’s most popular mobile operating system. It explores the Android SDK and various APIs used to develop applications using the Java programming language. (4 credits)
  • CT 6270 - Mobile App Development


    This is a study of Mobile app creation, specifically the creation of apps for Google’s Android, the world’s most popular mobile operating system. Building on a basic background in Java, students will work with Android Studio, Eclipse and with the Android Development Environment to create effective and useful Android applications. These applications will utilize various screen configurations and sizes and will incorporate techniques in classes, intents and permissions, and the design of various user interfaces. (4 Credits)
  • CT 6320 - Pega System Architect Essentials


    This course is for System Architects who are responsible for developing business applications. It reviews the core competencies required for participating in the development of a business application built on the Pega Platform. Students learn how to use Pega’s rules-based architecture to configure and test application functionality such as process flows, UI screens, automated decisions, and properties. (4 credits)
  • CT 6440 - Information Visualization


    In this course, students will be introduced to the field of Information Visualization. They will learn to acquire, parse, cleanse, and analyze large datasets. While learning basic visualization design and evaluation principles, students will use both Excel and the business intelligence software Tableau to create visualized interpretations of multivariate, temporal, geo-spatial business, medical, and scientific data collected from diverse sources. (4 credits)
  • CT 6530 - Python Programming


    This course provides an introduction to computer programming in Python, a popular, easy-to-learn, cross-platform language with extensive libraries. Programs can be written for immediate interpretation or for compilation. The language, libraries and development environments are open-source and free. Students will learn to recognize problems appropriate for computer program solutions, to determine the requirements of those solutions, and to translate those requirements into procedural programming constructs. Object-oriented programming methodology will also be covered. (4 credits)
  • CT 6560 - Web Programming with PHP/MySQL


    Server-Side Web Programming introduces the student to the core concepts of creating dynamic web pages using the PHP programming language and the MySQL database server. Students will learn to create and maintain their own databases and to execute the SQL required to access those structures using PHP.  Students will acquire the skills and templates required to construct web-based, content management oriented platforms. (4 Credits)
  • CT 6610 - IT Intelligence and Business Strategy


    This course will examine how IT can support and improve the process of strategic planning and designing business strategies.  Organizations are undergoing a series of revolutionary changes, including vertical integration, horizontal consolidation, strategic alliances and joint ventures, entrepreneurial startups, and specialized niche networks.  This course will critically examine changes and discuss the various strategic decisions and managerial skills needed to confront them in a variety of firms in organizations, as well as the use of technology in helping managers address these challenges.  The course will also focus on using information technology to craft successful business strategies. (4 Credits)
  • CT 6670 - Network Communications


    In this course you will study data communication networks focusing on the layered network structure and basic protocol functions. The course covers issues such as addressing, multiplexing, routing, forwarding, flow control, error control, congestion response, and reliability. It includes wired, wireless, and mobile networks. Multimedia, security, and network management topics will be introduced. Brief coverage is provided of the history of the Internet and the development of communication standards. (4 Credits)
  • CT 6740 - Java - Advanced Topics


    A continuation of Java - An intro to Object Oriented Programming. This course builds on the beginners Java course, and goes deeper into programming topics that help the student to understand more advanced Java concepts topics. Topics covered in the class include: simple and multi-dimensional arrays, recursion, inheritance, and polymorphism. (4 Credits)
  • CT 6770 - Network Programming


    This course is designed to extend student’s knowledge and practice in the design and analysis of computer networks by focusing on computer network programming. In addition, advanced network topics including network security, service-oriented architectures, programming interfaces such as Web services and REST using Python. (4 credits)
  • CT 6820 - Special Projects


    Special Projects is a course that allows senior-level students to work on real-world projects associated with the college. The class utilizes all aspects of the student’s academic training, including: project management, programming, system design, database integration, user training, and more. Students will operate in a team environment on real projects with established deliverables and target dates. This course is open to students who have demonstrated the skillsets required in a professional project cycle environment. (4 credits) It is offered by permission of the instructor only.
  • CT 6870 - Advanced Network Communications


    This course dives further into the routing and switching protocols that make networks work efficiently.  The main focus of this course is on layer 2 and layer 3 protocols which include spanning tree, multi-area OSPF, quality of service and port security.  This course introduces information assurance and security in networks in order to meet standard guidelines provided by the government. (4 credits)
  • CT 6890 - Quality Assurance and Testing


    Provides students with a working knowledge of the state of research and practice on software product and process evaluation and improvement. Stresses use of quantitative and experimental methods and change control as they are applied to evaluating software engineering. Pre-release software packages from commercial software vendors will be used as examples. (4 Credits)
  • CT 7610 - Database Management


    This course seeks to help students develop database management skills covering installation, configuration and tuning a database, administering servers and server groups, managing and optimizing schemas, tables, indexes, and views, creating logins, configuring permissions, assigning roles and performing other security tasks, including the design and implementation of backup and recovery strategies as well as maintenance. (4 Credits)

Creative Writing


The New England College Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program is more than a graduate degree program: it is transformative education for writers. The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program offers a rigorous graduate education in Creative Writing that is based on progressive pedagogy, individualized study, and academic/artistic mentorship. The program’s academic model is studio/research, integrating substantial work in the academic study and creative production of literary art. The Program’s academic format combines brief residential learning experiences on the New England College campus with individualized, home-based mentorship study. The Program’s educational model provides our students with an ideal structure for their academic coursework and individual development as writers-featuring an immersive, community-based educational experience in the residential setting, as well as independent home-based study that is supported by one-on-one faculty mentorship in a natural format for the writing life. The MFA Creative Writing Program’s progressive pedagogy and comprehensive curriculum guide students’ individual development in the study, process, practice, and profession of Creative Writing. Program graduates are well-prepared for the writing life and the pursuit of their individual goals and professional aspirations.

The Master of Fine Arts Creative Writing Program offers four primary areas of concentration for single-focus course of study: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Interdisciplinary Literary Arts. The MFA also offers a dual-genre option for students who wish to study two individual genres and a dual-focus option that combines study in the student’s primary genre with a specialized course of study in Social Practice.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program will:

  1. Understand the history, theories, and movements that have shaped and continue to influence the writing, reading, and critical reception of literary works.
  2. Be able to locate their own writing in historical, theoretical, and cultural contexts.
  3. Be able to engage in rigorous critical discourse on their own writing and the work of others.
  4. Demonstrate a keen awareness of the writer’s craft and effective use of craft in their own writing.
  5. Effectively employ skills and methods of revision in their writing process.
  6. Apply what they have learned and practiced to the production of a substantial body of high‐quality literary work.
  7. Demonstrate the skills, knowledge, and discipline necessary for successful post-graduate professional life in Creative Writing.
  8. Actively and ethically engage in their academic, literary, geographic, and cultural communities.
  9. Meaningfully contribute to literary/artistic culture and the advancement of the literary arts.

Degree and Thesis Requirements

The Master of Fine Arts is a terminal degree in the field of Creative Writing, and it requires at least two years (four semesters/five campus residencies) of intensive full-time study and the completion of at least 64 credits for a single-focus degree or two and a half years (five semesters/six campus residencies) of intensive full time study and the completion of at least 80 credits for a dual-focus degree.

Single-focus Course of Study (64 credit degree)

Creative Writing Workshop (8 credits) Creative Writing Seminar (8 credits) Mentorship Study: Creative Writing (16 credits) Creative and Critical Process (6 credits)

Craft, Theory, and Practice I and II (4 credits) Form and Theory I-V (10 credits)

Thesis I-IV (8 credits)

Advanced Theory and Practice I and II (2 credits ) Professional Practice (2 credits)

Submission of Creative Thesis (a full-length manuscript or equivalent)

Final Residency: Lecture, Public Reading, Thesis Defense

Dual-genre Course of Study (80 credit degree)

Creative Writing Workshop (10 credits total) Creative Writing Seminar (10 credits total)

Mentorship Study: Creative Writing (24 credits, with coursework completed in both primary and secondary genres)

Creative and Critical Process (8 credits)

Craft, Theory, and Practice I and II (6 credits) Form and Theory I-V (10 credits)

Thesis I-IV (8 credits)

Advanced Theory and Practice (2 credits ) Professional Practice (2 credits)

Submission of Creative Thesis*

Final Residency: Lecture, Public Reading, Thesis Defense

*Note: Dual-genre degree candidates must successfully complete thesis projects in both areas of study. This will include a full-length manuscript (or equivalent) in the primary genre, and a substantive project in the secondary area of concentration (e.g., a student whose primary concentration is Fiction and secondary concentration is Poetry might submit a full length fiction manuscript and a poetry chapbook).

Dual-focus Course of Study: Creative Writing/Social Practice (80 credits)

Creative Writing Workshops (10 credits total)

Creative Writing Seminars (10 credits total)

Mentorship Study: Creative Writing (16 credits completed in primary genre) Mentorship Study: Social Practice (8 credits/1 semester)

Creative and Critical Process (8 credits)

Craft, Theory, and Practice I and II (6 credits) Form and Theory I-V (10 credits)

Thesis I-IV (8 credits)

Advanced Theory and Practice (2 credits ) Professional Practice (2 credits)

Submission of Creative Thesis*

Final Residency: Lecture, Public Reading, Thesis Defense

* Note: Dual-focus degree candidates must successfully complete thesis projects in both areas of study. This will include full-length manuscript in the student’s primary writing genre, and a completed substantive project in Social practice (e.g., a student whose primary concentration is Poetry would complete a full length poetry manuscript for fulfillment of the primary genre requirement and for the Social Practice thesis requirement, might complete a community-based literary arts practicum or submit a project that uses writing to effect social change).

 

 

 

Programs

Major

Courses

English

  • EN 2020 - Language and Grammar


    This course is designed to teach students the nuances of the English language and grammar and enable them to become powerful writers. In addition to knowledge about the English language and grammar, students will acquire skills and strategies that will enable them to teach language and grammar effectively to students in K‐12. (4 Credits)
  • EN 5011 - Creative Writing Seminar I-IV


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, interdisciplinary or mixed-genre/hybrid forms. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of subjects in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft.

    Elective seminars may consider specific topics within individual genres, Interdisciplinary Literary Arts, or Social Practice, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). Course to be taken on campus during program residencies. (2 Credits)

  • EN 5011 - Poetry Seminar I


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5012 - Poetry Seminar II


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5013 - Poetry Seminar III


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5014 - Poetry Seminar IV


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5021 - Fiction Seminar I


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5022 - Fiction Seminar II


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5023 - Fiction Seminar III


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5024 - Fiction Seminar IV


    Seminar coursework provides curricular content focused on the study and writing of poetry or fiction. Seminar sessions cover a diverse range of topics in literature, literary technique, aesthetics, and the writer’s craft. Elective seminar classes may be specific to areas of concentrated study, such as Translation, or may focus on specific works, authors, schools of literature, or special topics in writing (e.g.; process, style, revision, editing and publishing). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5111 - Creative Writing Workshop I-IV


    Faculty-led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each others’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 Credits) Course to be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5111 - Poetry Workshop I


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 credits) taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5112 - Poetry Workshop II


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5113 - Poetry Workshop III


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5114 - Poetry Workshop IV


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5121 - Fiction Workshop I


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5122 - Fiction Workshop II


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5123 - Fiction Workshop III


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5124 - Fiction Workshop IV


    Faculty‐led, peer workshops in which students read and critique each other’s’ work, and discuss a range of authorial and literary concerns in conjunction with the works (e.g. process, craft, form, revision). (2 Credits) Must be taken on campus during program residencies.
  • EN 5151 - Craft, Theory, and Practice I


    This course requires students to read and respond critically to selected literary works, paying particular attention to craft and/or literary theory. The foundational academic and critical writing produced in this course begins students’ progression toward the advanced scholarly work of later semesters and future writing for publication. This course emphasizes the development of research and writing in practice. (2 Credits) Note: Home-based.
  • EN 5152 - Craft, Theory, and Practice II


    This course requires students to read and respond critically to selected literary works, paying particular attention to craft and/or literary theory. The foundational academic and critical writing produced in this course begins students’ progression toward the advanced scholarly work of later semesters and future writing for publication. This course emphasizes the development of research and writing in practice. (2 Credits) Note: Home-based.
  • EN 5311 - Mentorship Study: Creative Writing


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on-one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, special topic or craft-based analytical writing, and creative or project work in the student’s specified genre, form, or area of practice. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual-focus track will also take Mentorship Study courses in their secondary genre or in Social Practice. (2 Credits) Note: Home-based.
  • EN 5311 - Mentorship Study: Poetry I


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) home‐based.
  • EN 5311 - Mentorship Study: Social Practice


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on-one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes readings, academic exploration in the theory and practice of creative arts as a means to affect profound and lasting social change, critical and analytical writing, and creative work or projects that intersect Creative Writing and Social Practice. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. (2 Credits) Note: Home-based.
  • EN 5312 - Mentorship Study: Poetry II


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5313 - Mentorship Study: Poetry III


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5314 - Mentorship Study: Poetry IV


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5315 - Mentorship Study: Poetry V


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5316 - Mentorship Study: Poetry VI


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5317 - Mentorship Study: Poetry VII


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5318 - Mentorship Study: Poetry VIII


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5321 - Mentorship Study: Fiction I


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5322 - Mentorship Study: Fiction II


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5323 - Mentorship Study: Fiction III


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5324 - Mentorship Study: Fiction IV


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5325 - Mentorship Study: Fiction V


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5326 - Mentorship Study: Fiction VI


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5327 - Mentorship Study: Fiction VII


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 5328 - Mentorship Study: Fiction VIII


    Mentorship Study coursework is guided by an approved individualized study plan and one-on‐one faculty mentorship. For each section of Mentorship Study, students will complete and submit a full packet of coursework, which includes complementary readings, craft-based analytical writing, and creative work in the student’s specified genre. While course content is individualized, all students must meet the program’s standard curricular and credit hour requirements. Mentorship Study courses are taken in the first year of the program and serve as the foundation for students’ advanced creative and critical work in the second year. Students enrolled in a dual‐genre degree track will also take Mentorship Study courses for their secondary genre. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6131 - Form and Theory of Poetry I


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home-based.
  • EN 6132 - Form and Theory of Poetry II


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6133 - Form and Theory of Poetry III


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6134 - Form and Theory of Poetry IV


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home-based.
  • EN 6135 - Form and Theory of Poetry V


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6141 - Form and Theory of Fiction I


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6142 - Form and Theory of Fiction II


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6143 - Form and Theory of Fiction III


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6144 - Form and Theory of Fiction IV


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6145 - Form and Theory of Fiction V


    In the third semester coursework, students will undertake an advanced research project examining a formal or theoretical subject in their primary genre and will produce a substantial essay. Students also will continue to write and revise their creative work with feedback from their faculty mentor. Prerequisites: Students must submit a third semester project proposal and receive approval prior to beginning this coursework. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6151 - Creative and Critical Process I


    In ongoing dialogue with the faculty mentor, students will explore the relationship between their critical engagement with selected literary and scholarly texts and their own writing. Faculty mentors will provide feedback, support, and direction to assist students in the development of their research, writing, and revision processes. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based
  • EN 6152 - Creative and Critical Process II


    In ongoing dialogue with the faculty mentor, students will explore the relationship between their critical engagement with selected literary and scholarly texts and their own writing. Faculty mentors will provide feedback, support, and direction to assist students in the development of their research, writing, and revision processes. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based
  • EN 6153 - Creative and Critical Process III


    In ongoing dialogue with the faculty mentor, students will explore the relationship between their critical engagement with selected literary and scholarly texts and their own writing. Faculty mentors will provide feedback, support, and direction to assist students in the development of their research, writing, and revision processes. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6154 - Creative and Critical Process IV


    In ongoing dialogue with the faculty mentor, students will explore the relationship between their critical engagement with selected literary and scholarly texts and their own writing. Faculty mentors will provide feedback, support, and direction to assist students in the development of their research, writing, and revision processes. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6155 - Creative and Critical Process V


    In ongoing dialogue with the faculty mentor, students will explore the relationship between their critical engagement with selected literary and scholarly texts and their own writing. Faculty mentors will provide feedback, support, and direction to assist students in the development of their research, writing, and revision processes. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6156 - Creative and Critical Process VI


    In ongoing dialogue with the faculty mentor, students will explore the relationship between their critical engagement with selected literary and scholarly texts and their own writing. Faculty mentors will provide feedback, support, and direction to assist students in the development of their research, writing, and revision processes. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based
  • EN 6511 - Advanced Theory and Practice of Poetry I


    Advanced‐level exploration of the theory and practice of fiction or poetry with one‐on‐one faculty mentorship. These courses prepare students for sophisticated engagement with contemporary literary works and theories and contribute to the development of a lecture students must give at their final residency on an approved topic of their choice. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6512 - Advanced Theory and Practice of Poetry II


    Advanced‐level exploration of the theory and practice of fiction or poetry with one‐on‐one faculty mentorship. These courses prepare students for sophisticated engagement with contemporary literary works and theories and contribute to the development of a lecture students must give at their final residency on an approved topic of their choice. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6521 - Advanced Theory and Practice of Fiction I


    Advanced‐level exploration of the theory and practice of fiction or poetry with one‐on‐one faculty mentorship. These courses prepare students for sophisticated engagement with contemporary literary works and theories and contribute to the development of a lecture students must give at their final residency on an approved topic of their choice. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 6522 - Advanced Theory and Practice of Fiction II


    Advanced‐level exploration of the theory and practice of fiction or poetry with one‐on‐one faculty mentorship. These courses prepare students for sophisticated engagement with contemporary literary works and theories and contribute to the development of a lecture students must give at their final residency on an approved topic of their choice. (1 Credit) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 7050 - Professional Practice


    This course will prepare students for post-graduate professional life. It will cover content relevant to all MFA graduates, such as submitting and publishing work, entering contests, book publication, developing and maintaining writing community and connections, soliciting recommendation letters and referees, etc. Some of the coursework will be individualized to address each student’s specific vocational and professional goals. Students who wish to pursue writing-related occupations might elect to cover content relevant to careers in academia, editing and publishing, or non-profit arts organizations. Students also will develop and receive feedback on professional materials and processes (e.g., cover letters, work samples, agent queries, contracts, author statements, a curriculum vitae, pedagogical statement, interviewing). While students will be offered professional advice and course content throughout their time in the program, this course is individualized and has a workshop component to provide graduating students with the specific content and feedback they will need to begin their professional lives as writers. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 7051 - Thesis I


    The final semester coursework is focused on the development of a substantial body of literary work in the specified genre. Students also will write a critical introduction to their creative theses. Upon completion of the thesis semester coursework, students will be able to situate their own work in current aesthetic and critical contexts, and in relationship to its historical and critical/theoretical antecedents. The Thesis coursework is supported by a faculty mentor as well as a second faculty thesis advisor. To fulfill final degree requirements, students must give a public lecture and reading of their work and successfully defend their theses. (2 Credits) Note: Home-based.
  • EN 7052 - Thesis II


    The final semester coursework is focused on the development of a substantial body of literary work in the specified genre. Students also will write a critical introduction to their creative theses. Upon completion of the thesis semester coursework, students will be able to situate their own work in current aesthetic and critical contexts, and in relationship to its historical and critical/theoretical antecedents. The Thesis coursework is supported by a faculty mentor as well as a second faculty thesis advisor. To fulfill final degree requirements, students must give a public lecture and reading of their work and successfully defend their theses. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 7053 - Thesis III


    The final semester coursework is focused on the development of a substantial body of literary work in the specified genre. Students also will write a critical introduction to their creative theses. Upon completion of the thesis semester coursework, students will be able to situate their own work in current aesthetic and critical contexts, and in relationship to its historical and critical/theoretical antecedents. The Thesis coursework is supported by a faculty mentor as well as a second faculty thesis advisor. To fulfill final degree requirements, students must give a public lecture and reading of their work and successfully defend their theses. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.
  • EN 7054 - Thesis IV


    The final semester coursework is focused on the development of a substantial body of literary work in the specified genre. Students also will write a critical introduction to their creative theses. Upon completion of the thesis semester coursework, students will be able to situate their own work in current aesthetic and critical contexts, and in relationship to its historical and critical/theoretical antecedents. The Thesis coursework is supported by a faculty mentor as well as a second faculty thesis advisor. To fulfill final degree requirements, students must give a public lecture and reading of their work and successfully defend their theses. (2 Credits) Note: Home‐based.

Education

The Master of Education program is designed to develop teacher leadership in such ways that will further learning, increase student success, and continuously improve schools. In keeping with the adopted NH State Standards for Professional Development, the INTASC Standards and the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL), the Master of Education program at New England College is a rigorous, data‐driven, site‐based, classroom‐imbedded program, tightly linked to improvement in student achievement.

The program is offered to teachers who have already achieved certification, individuals seeking additional certification, individuals seeking initial certification, and those interested in working with children and youth. Most classes are on‐line.  Some classes are held in area schools or in the College’s Center for Educational Innovation, or are a combination of on‐line and face‐to‐face meetings. For online courses, students meet asynchronously with faculty through Blackboard, or another course management system, and maintain a professional portfolio utilizing the eFolio system. A range of electives is offered during the year and in the Summer Institute. Graduate students and NEC faculty work as a learning community to address real‐world issues of teachers and schools. The culminating activity for the program is an Action Research Project with results shared at a public presentation. For those seeking principal or superintendent licensure the action research project must focus on a school or district-wide initiative. For those not seeking principal or superintendent licensure the action research project can focus on a classroom challenge/issue.

For those seeking initial certification, please see Teacher Conversion Program .

A variety of areas of concentration are offered in this program: Special Education /Curriculum and Instruction /School Climate and Leadership/STEM/Literacy: Reading and Language Arts/Literacy: Math/Educational Leadership/Alternative Education/Storytelling/Digital and Media Literacy/English/Reading and Writing Specialist (does not provide certification)/School Business Administration (does not provide certification)/Principal /Superintendent . Teachers may also design an individualized major with the approval of the Associate Dean of Education.

The New England College Master of Education and Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) with Princial Certification  programs provide a specialized degree or certificate for career professionals who want to advance and engage in more senior leadership activities and responsibilities in K‐12 education. Those seeking principal licensure must have completed at least 5 years’ experience as an educator; and possess one of the following:

  1. Completed a master’s program in educational leadership or a related area approved by the state board of education and been recommended for this certification by the designated official of the preparing collegiate department of education; or
  2. Completed a master’s program in education, and demonstrated:
  1. The competencies, skills, and knowledge as listed in Ed 506.04; or
  2. Experience in comparable educational leadership positions in education or other professions as specified in Ed 505.03.

Those seeking superintendent licensure must have the following entry level requirements to be certified as superintendent:

  1. Have completed at least 3 years of experience as an education administrator in a k‐12 setting;
  2. Have completed a state board of education approved educational administration collegiate program at the post‐master’s certificate of advanced graduate study (CAGS), educational specialist, or doctoral level; and
  3. Have acquired the competencies, skills, and knowledge itemized in ED 506.01.

Students seeking New Hampshire principal or superintendent licensure can acquire the required academic credentials through this program. Upon completion of the core courses in the K‐12 leadership concentration, a student may elect to pursue the Principal M.Ed . strand if he or she does not have a master’s degree in education or the Principal CAGS strand for those who hold such a degree. Those seeking superintendent licensure must complete the CAGS program, therefore they must have a Master’s in Education to be eligible for the program.

In addition to the objectives of the Education Program the Graduate Education Program aspires to the INTASC standards for teachers and to the state and ISLLC standards for principals, superintendents, and other education leaders.

Programs

Major

Certificate

Courses

Education

  • ED 4000 - Methods of Instruction Across the Curriculum


    In this course students will learn to use data to inform instructional planning, plan lessons with the end in mind, identify the criteria for success, plan assessments that will allow them to determine the degree to which their students are meeting with success, identify best practices and alternatives for teaching those lessons, deliver lessons and reflect on the success of the lesson while determining the degree to which students have met with success and what the next steps in planning would be.  There will be a focus on integrating all content areas as well as an understanding of the breadth of the curriculum as it extends from K - 12. A thematic unit will be developed in this course. Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed ED 1001: Issues in Professional Practice and School Law and ED 2010 Curriculum Design, Planning, Instruction, and Assessment Across the Curriculum 

      Offered every fall Requires a Practicum Contract with all signatures provided (3 credits)

  • ED 4913 - Student Teaching: Special Education K-12


    Each student seeking certification is involved in a full-time student teaching experience. The student teacher cooperates in all phases of the school’s program: lesson planning, teaching, multidisciplinary teams, development of instructional materials, effective use of educational technology, teachers’ meetings, in-service opportunities, extra-curricular activities, and involvement in student activities. Student teachers follow the calendar of the school to which they are assigned and are expected to participate in all phases of the schools’ activities. Student teachers plan with their cooperating teacher and then develop detailed lesson plans for every lesson taught. A college supervisor will conduct three triad meetings - an initial triad meeting to set expectations, a middle of the semester triad meeting to evaluate progress using the Danielson Pre-service Teacher rubric, and then a final triad at the end to evaluate readiness for student teaching. Those seeking permission to participate in both a general education and special education student teaching experience must demonstrate competence in the elements on Danielson’s rubric and outstanding professionalism and be recommended by their college supervisor to do so. Experiential Component - full-time placement in a school. Prerequisites: Must have completed and passed the Criminal Record Check , must have been accepted in the education major, must have completed all other required courses. No other courses are taken during student teaching. Offered every fall and spring Requires a Practicum Contract with all signatures provided (6 - 12 credits depending on whether single certification or dual certification)
  • ED 4914 - Student Teaching: Physical Education K-12


    Each student seeking certification is involved in a full-time student teaching experience. The student teacher cooperates in all phases of the school’s program: lesson planning, teaching, multidisciplinary teams, development of instructional materials, effective use of educational technology, teachers’ meetings, in-service opportunities, extra-curricular activities, and involvement in student activities. Student teachers follow the calendar of the school to which they are assigned and are expected to participate in all phases of the schools’ activities. Student teachers plan with their cooperating teacher and then develop detailed lesson plans for every lesson taught. A college supervisor will conduct three triad meetings - an initial triad meeting to set expectations, a middle of the semester triad meeting to evaluate progress using the Danielson Pre-service Teacher rubric, and then a final triad at the end to evaluate readiness for student teaching. Those seeking permission to participate in both a general education and special education student teaching experience must demonstrate competence in the elements on Danielson’s rubric and outstanding professionalism and be recommended by their college supervisor to do so. Experiential Component - full-time placement in a school. Prerequisites: Must have completed and passed the Criminal Record Check , must have been accepted in the education major, must have completed all other required courses. No other courses are taken during student teaching. Offered every fall and spring (6 - 12 credits depending on whether single certification or dual certification)
  • ED 5000 - Technology and Information Literacy


    This course prepares students with the theory and practice of effectively integrating technology and technology applications into the elementary and secondary classroom. Students will be versed in a variety of technology skills, tools, and applications as they relate to teaching, learning, and assessment. Strategies will be explored in developing technology skills in using these resources in the classroom setting.  Safe, ethical and legal issues will also be addressed. (3 credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction
  • ED 5010 - Curriculum Design/Planning/Instruction/Assessment


    This course provides the student with an opportunity to acquire knowledge of and demonstrate competence in a variety of curricula in K-12 schools and plan, deliver, and evaluate instruction across the curriculum. There will be an emphasis on the Common Core and other content specific standards and how they become the driving force for lesson planning and assessment. The Understanding By Design model will be used to guide students in developing lessons that can be taught with small groups of learners, in this case in a special education setting. The curriculum in all content areas will be discussed and the integration of curriculum to enhance student learning and authentic forms of assessment will be a focus. (3 Credits) There is a 30 hour experiential component for those seeking certification. Required of those seeking certification.Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction
  • ED 5015 - Teaching Math


    This course provides students with the content knowledge needed to provide instruction in math. Mathematical reasoning, problem solving, and the use of various strategies and technology to help students acquire skills and knowledge associated with math literacy will be discussed. Students will also be exposed to current methods of teaching mathematics. There will be a focus on integrating mathematics into the other areas of the curriculum. Students will be required to spend time in a general education classroom working with teachers as they provide mathematic instruction including Response to Intervention instruction. (3 credits) 30 hour practical experience component for those seeking Certification. Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ STEM/ Literacy: Mathematics
  • ED 5020 - Curriculum & Methods of Teaching Language, Grammar and Writing: Developing Powerful Writers


    This course is designed to teach students the nuances of the English language and grammar and enable them to become powerful writers. In addition to knowledge about the English language and grammar, students will acquire skills and strategies that will enable them to teach grammar effectively to students in K-12. (3 credits) Is required by those seeking Certification. Is also required for Reading & Writing Specialist (does not provide Certification). There is a 30 hour experiential component for those seeking Certification. Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ Literacy: Reading & Language Arts/ English
  • ED 5030 - Meeting the Needs of all Learners


    In this course students become familiar with the role of the case manager and who constitutes the team, due process, who is a qualified examiner, and various placement options. In addition, the course helps students develop skills to implement an IEP/IFSP/Transition Plan, use data to inform decisions about the education of students and to make modifications to the curriculum, including instruction, assessment, and behavioral strategies for all students, find resources to support all learners and develop tools to assess learning and monitor and communicate student growth. (3 credits) 30 hour experiential learning component for those seeking Certification. Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Special Education/ Curriculum and Instruction
  • ED 5090 - Literature in the 21st Century: Exploring Literature for Youngsters, Adolescents, and Young Adults


    In this course students will explore and analyze a variety of contemporary literature genres (poetry, fiction, non-fiction), in the context of content areas to which children, adolescents, and young adults are currently exposed. Through reading, analysis and critical evaluation, students will use a variety of forms of communication, including writing, speaking, and listening to convey the essence of the literature to share this with students within the class and beyond.  (4 credits) Is required by those seeking Certification. Is also required by Reading & Writing Specialist (does not provide Certification). Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ Literacy: Reading & Language Arts/ English
  • ED 5121 - Math Content for Elementary Teachers


    This course will provide prospective or in-service elementary teachers with the opportunity to explore and master concepts involving number systems and operations, data analysis and probability, geometry, measurement, and algebraic thinking. Mathematical reasoning, problem solving, and the use of appropriate manipulatives and technology will be integrated throughout the course. The course will model instructional techniques that can be adapted to elementary curricula. (2 credits)
  • ED 5130 - Psychology of Learning Communities


    This advanced educational psychology course will explore theories of development, learning, motivation, intelligence, and recent advances in brain-based learning and neuropsychology.  Participants will critically assess various educational models and programs designed in accordance with the “new psychology” and use this information to critically assess current practices in teaching. (4 credits) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 5170 - Special Education: Disabilities, Issues, and Laws


    The primary goal of this course is to increase the student’s awareness of and sensitivity to individuals with special needs. In this course students will examine and become familiar with the laws relating to special education, the characteristics of various exceptionalities, the pre-referral, referral, and identification process, resources available to support learners, the roles of different related service personnel, the role of a paraeducator, how to work effectively as a team member with general education and other members of the special education team. Students will be expected to apply the knowledge from this course in a special education setting and reflect on what they are learning in the college classroom to what they are seeing in a school setting. (3 credits) There is a 30 hour experiential learning component for those seeking Certification. Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirement: Special Education/ Curriculum and Instruction
  • ED 5186 - Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Reading in the Content Area


    This course focuses on the literacy skills necessary for students to be successful in their content area courses. Participants will develop skills based on the latest research to teach students in 5-12 classrooms how to access their textbooks and other written material. This course will address issues such as fluency, vocabulary development in content areas, understanding how to read a text, strategies for studying and organizing material from a text, and strategies for retaining information. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ Literacy: Reading & Language Arts/ English/ Reading & Writing Specialist (does not provide Certification)
  • ED 5261 - Research Practicum I


    Research Practicum I is designed to help Master in Education candidates develop the introduction and literature sections of their Action Research proposal and to review the IRB request form for the Action Research capstone project. Students who enroll in Research Practicum I work with a faculty member who is versed in action research. This individual will guide and support the student as they develop the introduction and literature review for the Action Research proposal and project. Participants will also begin to formulate their ideas in relation to the methodology to be used in the Action Research project. Upon completion of this course and the competencies associated with it the student will be ready to enroll in ED 5262  ‐ Research Practicum II. Prerequisite: ED 5130 . (2 credits) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 5262 - Research Practicum II


    Research Practicum II is designed to help the Master in Education candidate to develop the methodology section and appendix her/his proposal and create and submit IRB request form for the Action Research capstone project. Students who enroll in Research Practicum II work with a faculty member who is versed in action research.  This individual will guide and support the student as she/he develops the research methodology, informed consent forms and data collection tools for use in her/his study, and assist the student with obtaining approval through the Institutional Review Board. Upon completion of this course and the competencies associated with it the student will be ready to enroll in the Fundamentals of Educational Inquiry: Action Research I, ED 6511  . Prerequisite: ED 5261 . (2 credits) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 5450 - Media Literacy for Social Change: Teaching Informational and Primary Texts


    Just as primary and informational texts have been pivotal in social change, the media has become equally as important. This course will explore the way teaching media literacy enhances the instruction of informational and primary texts. Students will explore various informational and primary texts as vehicles for social change. Topics in this course will include:  gender representation, youth and advertising, and politics and propaganda. Students will develop a professional development activity to use in their school or school district. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Digital and Media Literacy/ English
  • ED 5451 - Storytelling in a Digital Age: Incorporating Media Literacy into the English Class


    At the heart of every media message is a story. Someone created that story, found a target audience, and delivered the message. This class will explore those stories told through multiple modes including: radio, news media, advertisements, film, print, as well as social networking communities. The guiding question of this course asks who is telling the story? and students will study the process media messages take from inception to delivery. Students will leave the course with a developed lesson plan to use in their own classrooms as well as a clear understanding of the digital tools available to implement that lesson plan. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Digital and Media Literacy/ English.
  • ED 5452 - Critical Theory and Practice in Media and Digital Literacy: An Introduction to the Historical Context and Cultural Impact of the Methodologies


    This course will explore the historical roots of media and digital literacy in our schools. Students will learn about the different ways that media literacy has been integrated into English classes as well as the costs and benefits of those choices. Thought leaders and advocates of the fields will be studied. Students will conduct a case study of their home school or school district analyzing the integration and use of media and digital literacy. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Digital and Media Literacy
  • ED 5453 - Tricks of the Trade: Using Digital Tools to Enhance the English Curriculum


    Students in our classrooms are becoming more and more tech savvy each day.  As educators, we walk the fine line between introducing digital tools that help enhance our classrooms while avoiding digital fads.  This course will start by introducing students to the research surrounding the effects of technology on the brain. Next, students will learn about different digital tools and learn how to choose the best tool for a skill or unit of study.  Finally, this course will teach students how to help students think critically about the digital tools they use for their assignments.  The course will also include instruction of fair use and copyright policies. Students will leave this course with a redesigned curriculum unit that showcases digital tools for production and presentation. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Digital and Media Literacy
  • ED 5610 - STEAM Education: Integration, Challenge, and Curiosity


    At one time or another we have all had to enter into a curriculum by which we were slightly frightened. Whether it’s due to a lack of content knowledge, limited experience, or simply because we’re creatures of habit we have all stressed over how to incorporate new subject areas. In addition to the stress we feel due to change, there will always exist time constraints. Throughout this course we will explore the nature of STEAM and discuss and practice methods used to employ multiple facets of science in our elementary classrooms. Too often quality inquiry based science is over looked in the classroom and often times there are simple ways to connect our current curriculum to meaningful real world experiences for our students. Whether through lab experiences, off site exploration, or utilizing technology to create virtual experiences for our students we can all find ways to enjoy more exploratory science in our classrooms. We will begin by sharing some of the restraints we experience around STEAM education, explore best practice around science instruction, and finally transition into developing methods to encourage our students and our peers to get meaningful science back into our classrooms. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ STEM
  • ED 5611 - Digital Equity in the Digital Age


    In this course participants will explore research on the increasingly vital “digital inclusion” plays in economic opportunity. We also will examine policies and practices by which communities are significantly improving digital equity and inclusion. (3 credits)
  • ED 5612 - Systemics Dimensions of Digital Equity


    In this course participants will explore why digital equity investments must be “systemic” if they are to significantly improve such metrics as participation in living wage careers and educational opportunity and attainment. We will examine research that identified essential dimensions of a systemic approach, the growing range of known providers of these resources, and socially responsible business strategies for eliciting more providers to provide resources at increasingly affordable costs for all including low-income learners. (3 credits)
  • ED 5613 - Developing Partnerships for Digital Equity


    Participants will develop a cognitive map both of organizations with proven interest in supporting digital equity initiatives in support of educational and economic opportunity for all including low-income learners and families, and of strategies and rationales to engage organizations in collaboration. (3 credits)
  • ED 5620 - Next Generation Science Standards and STEAM Education: Integrating both into our Classrooms


    During this course we will explore the three dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards and connect these to the ideas of STEAM educational goals. NGSS can be incorporated in a number of ways and often times woven into our existing curriculum.   We will discuss the Disciplinary Core Ideas throughout NGSS and develop ways to increase our students’ awareness and ability to be analytical when developing questions. We will review the goals of the NGSS, understand the layout and organization of the standards, and connect this framework to best practices used to increase student curiosity around the ideas of STEAM education. Participants will align parts of their current content to the NGSS and prepare activities and performance based assessments for their classrooms. We will analyze the work of our peers and share content and resources throughout the course. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ STEM
  • ED 5630 - STEAM, Next General Science Standards and the Common Core: Combining These Frameworks as we Create Curriculum


    This course will combine the Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core, and STEAM frameworks to create or modify curriculum in our classrooms.  We will discuss ways to incorporate inquiry science into multiple disciplines and foster curiosity for our students. We will discuss ways of engaging our learners through exploration and create a variety of alternative assessment tools, to include more creativity and expression for our students. Throughout this course will take a look at curriculum and assessment techniques and build upon what we currently do to allow more flexibility for our students in our classrooms. Participants will share techniques they have had success with, review current best practices in the areas of science literacy, and develop assessments to use and reflect upon with the group. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ STEM
  • ED 5640 - Universal Design for Learning: Creating Variability and Opportunity for All Learners


    During this course we will explore the guidelines of UDL (Representation, Action and Expression, and Engagement) in our own curriculum. We will discuss the ideas of variability in our lesson development and create high standards for all learners regardless of their backgrounds, abilities, challenges, or skills.  This course will explore the differences and similarities between differentiation and UDL and take a proactive look at applying both concepts into our planning. The objective of this course will be to create access for all students to the curriculum we teach and employ options as we assess them. During this course we will explore the guidelines of UDL (Representation, Action and Expression, and Engagement) in our own curriculum. We will discuss the ideas of variability in our lesson development and create high standards for all learners regardless of their backgrounds, abilities, challenges, or skills.  This course will explore the differences and similarities between differentiation and UDL and take a proactive look at applying both concepts into our planning. The objective of this course will be to create access for all students to the curriculum we teach and employ options as we assess them. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ Special Education
  • ED 5710 - Explicit Teaching - Literacy across the Curriculum


    This highly interactive course will introduce participants to innovative literacy instructional methods. Participants will leave each session with literacy lessons across the curriculum that can be implemented in classrooms.  All of the course’s activities are designed to engage and motivate future or present educators, and provide them with powerful learning tools for their students. This course is designed to help educators increase their understanding of brain-based learning, curriculum, and technology integration. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Curriculum & Instruction/ Special Education/ Literacy: Reading & Language Arts/ Literacy: Mathematics
  • ED 5720 - Technology Integration with the Inclusion of Assistive Technology


    This course will introduce the diversity of assistive technology with an emphasis on making students aware of several applications of technology integration in the elementary and secondary environments.  Strategies will be explored in developing technology skills in using these assistive technology resources in the classroom setting.  Safe, ethical and legal issues will also be addressed. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum & Instruction, Special Education, and fulfills Technology requirement for certification all areas
  • ED 6000 - Literacy and Language Arts


    In this course students will investigate how learning to read and write is a developmental process requiring exposure to oral language and listening experiences. Students will explore current research on how the brain learns to read. Best methods for facilitating an effectively balanced and integrated literacy program will be discussed. There will be an emphasis on phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension. Strategies for reading in the content area such as how to access textbooks and other written material will be discussed. Students will also explore how reading problems occur, how to carry out diagnostic procedures in the classroom, how to determine students strengths and needs in relation to reading and how to implement corrective instruction. Students will spend time in a general education classroom working closely with a teacher or teachers who are providing instruction in reading and Response to Intervention instruction. (3 Credits) Is required by those seeking certification all areas. There is a 30 hour experiential component for those seeking certification. Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction/ Literacy: Reading & Language Arts/ English/ Reading & Writing Specialist (does not provide Certification).
  • ED 6010 - Introduction to School Climate Leadership


    This advanced Educational psychology course will explore theories of youth social and emotional intelligence, learning, motivation, intelligence and recent advanced in brain-based learning and neuropsychology as it relates to school climate, bullying, and respectful teaching.  Participants will critically assess various educational models and programs designed to reduce bullying and harassment, as well as specific respectful teaching practices that deepen student engagement, personalized learning and teacher and student empowerment and use this information to critically assess current practice in school climate leadership and school change.  (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: School Culture and Leadership; Educational Leadership
  • ED 6021 - Beyond Bullying: Understanding Bullies, Victims, and Bystanders


    This course will expose students to the latest research on bullying and harassment in schools and the effects of bullying on victims, bystanders, and bullies themselves. Students will explore the roles adults have played as bystanders, tacit supporters, and even bullies themselves and how to train teachers, students, school leaders, and parents to address social conflict, threshold behaviors and bullying. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration: School Climate and Leadership/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 6022 - Critical Connections: Student Engagement, Empowerment, and Respectful Schools


    This course will help students understand the dimensions of “power” associated with respectful teaching, school climate, and bullying. We will explore strategies for engaging and empowering all students to serve as community advocates and resources, experts, and school change leaders, with special emphasis on empowering those students who have been socially isolated or targets of bullying and harassment. Student civic engagement, service-learning, and social activism for social justice in schools and society will be explored and applied. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: School Climate and Leadership/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 6025 - Habits of Mind, Grit, and Growth Mind Set: The Other Side of the Report Card


    In this course we will review ideas and skills to help individuals grow as people, educators, and students. We know that people are motivated in different ways; we know that people have different wants and needs; we know that some people persevere while other people give up too easily; we know that some people are optimistic and some people are pessimistic. We now also believe that the positive habits of our minds, optimism, perseverance, positive self-talk, and the ability to take more control over what we think and do all can be taught, nurtured, and enhanced. In this course we will work to begin this process by enhancing our own abilities and then we will work to set up our teaching environments to teach and enhance the thinking and the actions of our students. If we are successful, anything we want our students to learn will develop in much more positive and powerful ways for more of our students. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentrations requirements: Curriculum & Instruction/ School Climate Leadership/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 6035 - Reading and Writing Specialist


    This course is designed to familiarize the individual participating in the course with the various roles and responsibilities of the Reading and Writing Specialist.  In addition, it will expose the learner to various models, resources, and individuals used to promote reading and writing success.  The course is also designed to help the individual acquire skills to be a leader in a school/district and how to effectively collaborate with other educators. (3 credits)
  • ED 6110 - Dynamics of Curriculum and Instruction


    This course will explore theoretical and conceptual foundations of curriculum and development and instructional design for the elementary grades, secondary grades, physical education K-12, Theatre K-12, and Special Education K-12. The impact of national, state, and local standards for student learning will be explored as they relate to the curriculum development process. Participants will design meaningful curriculum models and contextualized learning activities in the context of these standards. Is required by those seeking certification. (4 credits) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6140 - Fundamentals of Storytelling for Educators


    Storytelling is the interactive art of using words and actions to reveal the elements and images of a story while encouraging the listener’s imagination. In this course, students will learn how to construct and tell a well-developed story that holds interest and is effectively communicated to its listeners. Students will begin by exploring narrative stories to examine the basic elements of theme, plot, style, characterization, dramatic appeal, and appropriateness to listeners. Once a story line is well mapped out and adapted to a particular audience, the focus will shift to preparation for telling. Basic storytelling skills will be explored to make it your own, including dialogue, voice, gestures, facial expression, pacing, repetition, and exaggeration. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Storytelling/ English
  • ED 6141 - The Art & Power of Storytelling


    Stories are the medium of our lives. They are what move us, make us feel alive, and inspire us by stirring our emotions. In this course, participants will learn the art of turning information into meaning through the logic and process of story. Educators will learn practical instruction in the art of storytelling and effective storytelling strategies for children and adults. The class will explore how this exciting art form can be used to enliven classroom learning, build communities, and provide creative entertainment. Participants will learn how they can become imaginative, confident storytellers and more engaging speakers by developing dynamic vocal and physical delivery skills, creating stronger connections to their audiences, and employing a natural, spontaneous style. The multicultural history of oral tradition and interdisciplinary applications of the art of storytelling will also be examined. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Storytelling/ English
  • ED 6142 - Bringing History to Life Through Story Preservation Initiative


    Students will be introduced to a variety of first-hand narratives and primary source documents for K-12 classrooms using the online educational resource Story Preservation Initiative (SPI) that includes links to trusted external sites: Library of Congress, PBS Learning Media, Smithsonian, Center for Ecoliteracy, J. Paul Getty Museum, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Participants will learn how to search SPI’s vast collection and study teacher created lesson plans connected to these personal accounts. In addition, students will be introduced to other classroom materials using these resources to further enrich their classroom instruction. Participants will then apply their knowledge by integrating SPI narratives and resources to create lessons and activities for a differentiated, inquiry-based unit that can be used in their own classroom. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Storytelling/ English
  • ED 6143 - Story Preservation Initiative (SPI) Learning Lab: A Springboard to Project-based Learning


    This innovative course provides deeper inquiry into Story Preservation Initiative Learning Lab®, an oral history-based educational resource that combines primary source audio with project-based lessons for rich, multi-disciplinary learning. Participants will experience the power of sparking student interest in content using SPI’s collection of personal recordings that capture the voices, words, and meanderings of artists, scientists, writers, poets, musicians, and eyewitnesses to history. Connecting the personal narratives of experts to content learning in the arts, sciences, humanities, and eyewitness accounts provides an exciting and unique springboard to project-based learning. Participants will learn to support students with developing orbital studies, independent investigations that “orbit” or revolve around some aspect of the content. This involves designing a question for study, developing a research plan and method for presenting their learning, and criteria to measure quality products. Through inquiry-based learning, participants will experience how rigorous and relevant personalized and differentiated instruction can increase student motivation and engagement that supports students as they develop expertise and become independent learners. Prerequisite: ED 6142  Bringing History to Life Through Story Preservation Initiative (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Storytelling/ English
  • ED 6144 - Digital Storytelling: A Powerful Teaching and Learning Tool for the 21st Century Classroom


    Digital storytelling is a powerful tool for providing students with the technology skills they need to thrive in 21st century media-rich environments. This fun, creative class explores digital storytelling as a new form of documentary that allows computer users to become creative storytellers through the use of digital multimedia. Teacher-created digital stories can be used to enhance current lessons within a unit and engage students in discussions about the topics presented. They can also support learning by making abstract or conceptual content more understandable. Emphasis is on the use of digital technology to explore various ways one can tell a story, and how to effectively leverage story to engage, inform and educate the learner. After selecting and researching a topic, students will write a script, and develop an interesting story. This material will then be combined with various types of multimedia, including computer-based graphics, recorded audio, computer-generated text, video clips, and music. The author then narrates in their own voice over the series of images. This class provides basic knowledge of the range of capabilities of available multimedia including audio and video design applications for creating instructional products. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Storytelling/ English
  • ED 6146 - Story Preservation Initiative (SPI) Learning Lab Practicum I


    SPI Learning Lab Practicum I offers students the opportunity to work directly with SPI staff to develop a unit of study that integrates personal narrative into their classroom. In this course, students will become familiar with the Story Preservation Initiative website and choose a personal narrative from the site that will act as a springboard to learning for a unit of study that is project-based. Students will determine a topic and develop a unit plan outline that includes grade level competencies, related materials, and assessment evidence that will support the project. Teachers are required to meet with an SPI staff member three times within the seven-week period either virtually, via phone or face to face, to discuss ongoing progress with the project as well as student and teacher engagement. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Storytelling/ English
  • ED 6147 - Story Preservation Initiative (SPI) Learning Lab Practicum II


    SPI Learning Lab Practicum II is designed for teachers with Learning Lab projects currently underway. In this course, students will teach the SPI unit/lessons of study, developed in Practicum I and assess student learning along the way. Teachers are required to meet (virtually or otherwise) with SPI staff three times within the seven-week period to further discuss project development and progress, student and teacher engagement, as well as assessment tools, and documentation. At the end of the seven-week period, teachers are required to produce an integrated Understanding by Design unit plan to be added to the SPI collection, which may be shared with other teachers. SPI staff will be available as a resource to teachers throughout the project period. Prerequisite: ED 6146   (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Storytelling/ English
  • ED 6150 - Diagnostic and Remedial Reading Diagnosis


    Diagnostic and Remedial Reading and correction of student reading disabilities will be explored. This course will focus on helping preservice teachers understand how reading problems occur, how to carry out diagnostic procedures in the classroom that determine students’ strengths and needs, how to implement corrective instruction, and how to maintain responsibility for ongoing instruction and evaluation. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ED 2110. Offered every spring. (3 credits)
  • ED 6180 - Methods of Evaluation and Assessment: Using Data Meaningfully


    This course will examine formative and summative modes of assessment as well as the impact of current national and state level assessments on teaching and learning.  Performance-based assessments as well as critical analysis of the strengths and limitations of standardized testing will serve as the foundation of this course. Participants will conduct school-wide assessment inventories, examine personal and professional beliefs about assessment among teachers, and explore the relationship between assessment and instruction. Is required by those seeking certification. (4 credits) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6190 - Taming the Data Beast: Understanding and Using Assessment Data to Inform Instructional Decisions


    What are district and classroom based assessments saying about our students, and how can we use them to make informed decisions in which to meet the needs of all learners. As schools wrestle with implementing effective Response to Intervention systems, it is critical that staff can effectively utilize progress monitoring tools and assessment data to ensure best instructional practices.  This class will focus on analyzing data in order to inform instruction and improve student growth. Students will read and discuss articles related to using data to inform instruction, analyze and sort district and/or classroom data, design a grade book using content standards to track progress, create a data correlation chart to be used as a resource or in communicating levels of achievement with colleagues, students and parents, and create an instructional improvement plan using a framework such as universal design for learning.   (4 Credits) Meets MED Core requirement. Can be taken as a concentration course for any concentration. Can substitute for ED 6180 Evaluation and Assessment: Making Data Meaningful.
  • ED 6280 - Differentiated Instruction and Assessment: Inclusion for all Learners


    This course will focus on addressing the needs of all of the students in your classroom. Participants will learn to develop curriculum and instructional strategies to assist all students in their acquisition of knowledge. Students will develop tired lessons to assist students with special education needs to access important curriculum as well as create lessons for advanced academic students. Using the latest research participants will work with learning styles, multiple intelligences, personality type, student interest, flexible cooperative groupings, and psychologically motivating techniques to create lessons for the myriad students in classrooms. Teachers will learn to accommodate for students with IEP’s and for academically talented students. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Special Education/ Curriculum and Instruction.
  • ED 6320 - Teaching Immigrant Students


    The overall goal of this course is to understand cultural and communication issues that English Language Learners (ELLs) and their teachers are likely to encounter in classrooms and to acquire knowledge and techniques to facilitate the success of ELLs. Course participants will research and critically reflect upon selected aspects of culture as a basis to understand students and to create appropriate teaching materials. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction
  • ED 6410 - Dynamics of Educational Reform and Systems Change


    This course will examine schools from a systems perspective and theories of social and organizational change. Authoritarian and participatory leadership models will be examined and participants will conduct an extensive review of recent research in the field of educational reform. Participants will apply their understanding of various systems models to plan and design a complex systemic reform initiative. (4 credits) There is a 30 hour practical experience component for those seeking certification. (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6430 - Interrupting the School to Prison Pipeline - The Future of Black and Brown Boys in the USA


    The goal of this course is to deepen our understanding of issues related to the construction of the school to prison pipeline. The issues that the course will address are inequality, discipline polices, systematic criminalization of youth, the achievement gap, and workings of the prison industrial president complex. The course will also consider the pipeline first and foremost as a manifestation of “structural racism”. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Curriculum and Instruction
  • ED 6452 - Calculus AB for Educators


    The goal of this course is to help teachers develop their students’ geometric insight into the concepts of differentiation and integration, and to apply these concepts to problem solving and “real world” applications. Course content will focus on the differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Mathematics
  • ED 6511 - Fundamentals of Educational Inquiry: Action Research I


    Students will implement a comprehensive action research process in the context of a school or agency. Students will collect data based on the data collection tools developed in Research Practicum II ED 5262  . Prerequisite: Must have completed ED 5262  and have IRB proposal approved. (2 credits) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6512 - Fundamentals of Educational Inquiry: Action Research II


    Students in this course will continue to work on their Action Research project. They will analyze their data, complete the writing of their project, and implement a public presentation. Prerequisite: Must have completed ED 6511 . (2 credits) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6710 - STEM Integration in the K-12 Classroom: An Interdisciplinary Approach


    This course is designed to provide an interdisciplinary methodology to teaching and incorporating STEM practices across all disciplines. This course will involve active participation as discovery/inquiry learning, integration practices, and performance-based assessments and tasks are explored. Participants will understand the importance of developing critical thinkers in the classroom who value and promote investigation, inquiry, exploration, and questioning. The specific skills and principles to be examined and incorporated into professional practices within all disciplines, as presented by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), include:

    • Asking questions and defining problems

    • Developing and using models

    • Planning and carrying out investigations

    • Analyzing and interpreting data

    • Using mathematics and computational thinking

    • Constructing explanations and designing solutions

    • Engaging in argument from evidence

    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirements: Curriculum & Instruction/ STEM

  • ED 6750 - Consultation and Collaboration in Alternative Education


    This course provides an overview of models and strategies for coordinating services across disciplines and among school, family, and community agencies. Emphasis on interdisciplinary team coordination, communication, decision making, planning, and follow-up for individuals. The course will also focus on the role of the alternative program as a consultant and resource to other educational programs and agencies. This course will focus on the National Alternative Education Association Exemplary Practices for Alternative Education. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: Alternative Education
  • ED 6751 - Developing and Sustaining Excellence in Schools


    This course provides an overview of the development of sustainable policies, procedures, staffing, and professional development that lead to sustainable alternative programs.  Emphasis on establishing and maintaining a balance of stability and flexibility as required by the nature of alternative education.  The role of data analysis and program evaluation as it contributes to ongoing school improvement, the development of best practices, and individual staff and professional growth is covered. This course will focus on the National Alternative Education Association Exemplary Practices for Alternative Education. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirements: Alternative Education
  • ED 6752 - Planning for Student Success in Alternative Schools


    This course provides an overview of additional support for the students in the alternative environment to enable academic and behavioral improvements.  Topics will introduce the definition, techniques, and examples of addressing modifying student behavior.  The course will contain an exploration of options to prepare students for post-secondary success. This course will highlight the National Alternative Education Association Exemplary Practices for Alternative Education. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirements: Alternative Education
  • ED 6753 - Transition Services for Students in Alternative Education


    This course provides an overview of techniques and processes used in programming for the needs of individuals as they prepare for transition to alternative programs and back to a comprehensive school program. This course will also focus on the development of an Alternative Education Plan and Transition Plan. Discussion will also focus on postsecondary programs and employment opportunities. Emphasis on skills related to professional liaison and support roles in the design of instructional arrangements and cooperative training. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirements: Alternative Education
  • ED 6754 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in Alternative Schools


    This course provides an overview of curriculum, instructional strategies and programming, digital and virtual learning, and the role of student assessment.  There is an emphasis on specific curriculum, engagement strategies and learning environments effective in alternative schools based on research.  The role of formative and summative assessment, intervention, and how they work together to increase learning and engagement in alternative schools will also be reviewed.  This course will focus on the National Alternative Education Association Exemplary Practices for Alternative Education. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirements: Alternative Education
  • ED 6755 - Instructional Leadership in Alternative Schools


    This course provides an overview of instructional leadership and the role of the student in the alternative environment.  There is an emphasis on the program’s mission, goals, and target student population.  Fundamental values are introduced that form the foundation for the design, operation, development, and administrative oversight of the alternative education program.  The role of culture & climate and how they work together to support learning in alternative schools will also be a focus of this course.  This course will highlight the National Alternative Education Association Exemplary Practices for Alternative Education. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirements: Alternative Education
  • ED 6810 - Directed Study in Education


    The course of study for this class will be arranged between faculty and student in the field of Education. Contract required. Variable credit (1‐6 credits) May be repeated for credit.
  • ED 6823 - Victorian Poetry


    This course examines the works of the major English poets of the period 1830-1900. We will pay special attention to Alfred Tennyson and Robert Browning, and their great poetic innovation, the dramatic monologue. We will also be concentrating on poems by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Christina Rossetti, Matthew Arnold, A. E. Housman, and Thomas Hardy. (3 Credits) Meets MED and CAGS concentration requirement: English
  • ED 6830 - Independent Study in Education


    This course offers the advanced student an independent study of a specific topic. The course of study for this class will be arranged with a faculty member. Contract required. Variable credit (1‐6 credits)
  • ED 6951 - Portfolio I


    This course will involve the preparation of an individualized teaching portfolio. Students will become familiar with Charlotte Danielson’s Frameworks for Effective Teaching and the INTASC standards or appropriate principal or superintendent standards. They will begin to develop a Working Portfolio that they will complete in Portfolios II, III, & IV where they will create their Professional Presentation Portfolio. (1 credit) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6952 - Portfolio II


    This course will assist participants in the development of their professional portfolios. They will continue to develop a Working Portfolio that they will complete in Portfolios III & IV where they will create their Professional Presentation Portfolio. For Teacher Conversion students this portfolio class will also help you to prepare for applying to the certification program. Prerequisite: Completion of Portfolio I. (1 credit) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6961 - Portfolio III


    This course will assist participants in the development of their professional portfolios. They will continue to develop a Working Portfolio that they will complete in Portfolio IV where they will create their Professional Presentation Portfolio. In this course students will work to connect their work in the program to the appropriate standards. Prerequisite: Completion of Portfolio II. (1 credit) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6962 - Portfolio IV


    This course will involve the preparation of an individualized leadership portfolio. Participants will develop their final portfolios to be used to demonstrate competency in the appropriate standards for their programs. In Portfolio IV students will generate their final professional portfolios. Prerequisite: Completion of Portfolio III. (1 credit) (MED CORE Requirement)
  • ED 6964 - Leadership Portfolio I


    This course will assist participants in the development of their professional portfolios. They will continue to develop a Working Portfolio that they will complete in Portfolio IV where they will create their Professional Presentation Portfolio. In this course students will develop their standards template and explanations and connect their work in the program to the appropriate standards. (1 credit) Is required by those seeking principal and superintendent certification
  • ED 6965 - Leadership Portfolio II


    This course will involve the preparation of an individualized leadership portfolio. Participants will develop their final portfolios to be used to demonstrate competency in the appropriate standards for their programs. In Portfolio IV students will generate their final professional portfolios. Prerequisite:  Completion of Leadership Portfolio I. (1 credit) Is required by those seeking principal and superintendent certification
  • ED 7000 - School Leadership


    This course is designed to increase understanding of leadership and how it applies in the public school system. The principles of effective leadership will be explored and applied in a project-based setting. This application will include but is not limited to the following areas: human relations, teacher supervision and evaluation, school culture, budget development, meeting facilitation, building organization, emergency management, student assessment, and department structure. This is an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the principal and participants will be required to develop a philosophy learning taking into consideration multiple stakeholder input.  Is required by those seeking principal certification (3 credits)
  • ED 7001 - School Finance and Policy


    This course is designed to address the principal’s role and responsibilities in designing proper financial and accounting procedures, develop site-based budgets and create a system for monitoring account expenditures (object and function codes such as regular education, special education, school administration, transportation, athletics, student activities, etc.). Students will become familiar the plethora of policies (including NH State School Approval standards) used within a district and with the process by which policies and procedures are developed, implemented, evaluated, and revised. Is required by those seeking principal and superintendent certification and School Business Administration (does not provide Certification).. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration: Educational Leadership
  • ED 7002 - Supervision of Curriculum and Instruction


    Students involved in this course will become familiar with Danielson’s model for evaluating teacher effectiveness. In addition, they will become familiar with the State of New Hampshire recommendations for evaluating teacher effectiveness which is linked to the INTASC standards. As part of the course individuals will be asked to assess themselves and several colleagues then evaluate using the Danielson model. They will provide feedback to the individuals regarding their performance and help the individuals create an action plan for professional development. In addition, individuals will become familiar with strategies for pre-conferencing as well as coaching after conducting an observation. (3 credits)
  • ED 7003 - Educational Leadership and Critical Issues


    This course explores the foundational issues of the role of education in society, the impact of philosophies of learning on education, the human, technical and structural dimensions of education, and critical issues facing schools today. In this course participants will understand issues of culturally responsive leadership, navigating in complex environments with diverse stakeholders, and working with diverse groups/stakeholders to build a shared vision, establish shared goals and develop a strategic plan, including detailed action plans. Is required by those seeking principal and superintendent certification (4 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration: Educational Leadership
  • ED 7004 - School Law: ME, NH, & Federal


    Educators must know the laws that govern the operation and conduct of their organizations as they face a highly litigious society. ED 7004 is a study of the relevant legal principles that impact school governance and legal issues related to children. In ED 7004, practicing teachers, prospective teachers, as well as practicing and prospective administrators will gain knowledge about legal issues that will help them in effectively performing their professional duties within the boundaries of constitutional, statutory, and case law. Is required by those seeking principal and superintendent certification and School Business Administration (does not provide Certification).. (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS concentration requirement: Special Education/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 7005 - Education Technology Leadership


    This course provides participants with an opportunity to explore critical perspectives on technology leadership and the need for grounding technology decision in focused efforts to improve students’ learning results, learning opportunities and learning climate. Participants will also develop skills in assessing the digital divide issues and in identifying and tapping local resources to overcome digital inequities. Is required by those seeking principal and superintendent certification and School Business Administration (does not provide Certification). (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration REquirement: Digital Leadership/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 7006 - Labor Relations


    This course reviews the law as well as the practical strategies and practices of labor relations in K-12 school systems. Participants will become familiar with the issues involved with collective bargaining and contract management. Is required by those seeking Superintendent Certification and School Business Administration (does not provide Certification). (3 credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Educational Leadership.
  • ED 7008 - Achieving Educational Equity


    Participants enrolled in this course will develop skills in using data to identify inequities, mobilize local stakeholders to recognize the extent and importance of inequities, and to assess progress in improving students’ learning results, learning opportunities, and learning climate. Participants will also develop an understanding of important dimensions of educational equity and an appreciation of the factors of diversity (e.g., gender, socio-economics, race, language, and culture) and proven strategies and resources for addressing them. The goal is for the participants to understand and be able to develop a community of learners that has a positive impact on achievement. (3 credits) Is required by those seeking Superintendent Certification. Meets MED & CAGS Concentration: Educational Leadership.
  • ED 7009 - Facilities Planning and Management and Data-based Decision Making


    Participants will become familiar with population projection processes, adapting current and new facilities to meet various needs, maintaining and improving existing facilities, and meeting or upgrading facilities in light of various local, state, federal codes.  Participants will also become familiar with needs identification, including enrollment projections, and educational specifications, auxiliary services, costs per required square footage, community surveys, facility development, and managing the budget and warrant article processes within the context of data-based management systems. (3 Credits) Is required by those seeking Superintendent Certification and School Business Administration (does not provide Certification).
  • ED 7011 - Evaluating Effective Teaching and Curriculum


    Students involved in this course will become familiar with Danielson’s model for evaluating teacher effectiveness. In addition, they will become familiar with the State of New Hampshire recommendations for evaluating teacher effectiveness which is linked to the INTASC standards. As part of the course individuals will be asked to assess themselves and several colleagues as they are delivering the curriculum and evaluate teaching effectiveness using the Danielson model. They will provide feedback to the individuals regarding their performance and help the individuals create an action plan for professional development. In addition, individuals will become familiar with strategies for pre-conferencing as well as coaching after conducting an observation. (3 Credits) Is required by those seeking Principal and Superintendent Certification. Meets MED & CAGS Concentration: Educational Leadership.
  • ED 7012 - Special Education Law


    This course offers graduate students a detailed view of IDEA acquainting prospective special education administrators with New Hampshire and Maine special education state and federal laws and regulations.  The course tenants include FAPE (Free and Appropriate Education), Child Find and LRE (Least Restrictive Environment), actual decisions from due process cases surrounding students with disabilities, conflict resolution and mediation using case studies.  Students are expected to apply these principles when analyzing texts and case studies throughout this course. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: Special Education/ Educational Leadership. Is required of those seeking Principal licensure in Maine.
  • ED 7015 - Supervision of Personnel


    This course will assist you in your quest to become an effective school principal. One of the most important jobs of the principal is the recruitment, supervision, and retention of effective personnel. In this course we will develop systems for you to use as you approach supervision in your schools. We will review the leadership supervision process from a variety of perspectives including: setting the context for ethical and effective supervision, developing of teachers and other personnel, evaluating, supervising and retaining personnel, and including the supervision model in the creation and maintenance of a positive and productive school culture. Participants will review existing models and develop models of supervision that align with their philosophy of educational leadership. (3 credits) Required of individuals seeking Principal licensure in Maine.
  • ED 7020 - Exploring Assessment and Accountability: Controversies and Solutions


    This course explores the various assessments, standardized and authentic, that teachers and school leaders can use to inform instruction. It goes beyond just looking at test data to actually developing plans using data to improve learning in schools and classrooms. Students will analyze the conditions needed for designing high-quality assessment systems, develop specific competencies and become proficient at productively discussing Assessment Practices, Assessment Principles, and Assessment Policies. Students will be able to more deeply engage in professional dialogue with other educational professionals about using and improving student assessment. The link between school effectiveness, student achievement, and accountability will be discussed. (4 Credits) Meets CAGS Core requirement
  • ED 7025 - Educational Research Design


    Students in this course will increase their research knowledge and skills.  In addition, students will become better consumers of research in order to integrate theory into practice for program development, assessment, and curriculum delivery. As a result of this course, students will be able to 1) Articulate the role of research methodology in education, 2) Identify, describe, and evaluate various quantitative methodologies, 3) Compare and contrast research designs, data collect methods, and analyses, 4) Critique published educational research, and 5) Identify implications for research on human subjects. Is required of those seeking superintendent certification (4 credits)
  • ED 7030 - Culminating Leadership Plan


    Every school leader needs to have a plan for moving forward. Whether you are a formal leader such as a principal or superintendent or a teacher leader it is critical that you have a sense of direction, a plan with actionable steps, individuals who can help achieve the goals, people to take responsibility for achieving the goals, criteria for success, and possible evidence of meeting the identified goals. In this course students will take stock of where they are and where they would like to be in five years, discuss this vision with colleagues, find research to support the direction in which they want to go, and develop a leadership plan to help them achieve their vision and goals. (4 Credits) Meets CAGS Core requirement
  • ED 7031 - Practicum in Reading and Writing Specialist Part I


    Students enrolled in this course are required to spend a minimum of 15 hours a week developing their skills as Reading and Writing Specialists working directly with a certified Reading and Writing Specialist.  They will work directly with students, collaborate with teachers, and take a leadership role in managing the required roles of a Reading and Writing Specialist.  A college supervisor will hold an initial triad meeting to set expectations and a final triad meeting to evaluate progress and readiness to move on to ED 7032 Practicum in Reading and Writing Specialist Part II. (1 credit)
  • ED 7032 - Practicum in Reading and Writing Specialist Part II


    Students enrolled in this course are required to spend a minimum of 15 hours a week further developing their skills as Reading and Writing Specialists working directly with a certified Reading and Writing Specialist.  They will work directly with students, collaborate with teachers, and take a leadership role in managing the required roles of a Reading and Writing Specialist building on the skills and knowledge they acquired in Practicum in Reading and Writing Specialist Part I.  A college supervisor will hold an initial triad meeting to review expectations and a final triad meeting to evaluate progress. (1 credit)
  • ED 7062 - Pedagogy and the Respectful School


    This course will explore theoretical and conceptual foundations of curriculum development, alternative assessment and instructional design as it relates to two “grand theories” of learning; behaviorism and constructivism. Authentic instruction, solving real problems, inquiry-based, community-based, and service-based learning, and the use of virtual learning tools will be explored in relation to student motivation, engagements, teacher student relationships, and the geography of learning. Students will assess the professional development needs of a school in relation to changing expectations for student learning in 21st century schools. Students will develop professional learning community processes and professional development plans in light of key theories, concepts, and models discussed in the course. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: School Climate and Leadership/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 7063 - Legal Issues for School Climate Leaders


    This course examines the substantive and procedural rights of children and the competing interests of their parents and the state (aka school) in a variety of school climate, educational equity, harassment, discrimination, and other safe schools contexts. Students will understand NH Anti-Bullying Laws as well as those from other states. They will gain an understanding of the relationships between Civil Rights, Human Rights, and Disability protections and school climate advocacy and leadership. (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: School Climate and Leadership/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 7064 - Using Data to Understand, Monitor, and Improve Climate and Learning


    This course provides participants with the knowledge base to manage district-wide school data that can be used to understand school climate and its relationship to student learning. A variety of systems will be explored and evaluated. Participants will develop technology systems to manage both objectives and incident data to assess school safety, student engagement, and attendance as well as systems for collecting and using “perceptual” school climate data from school-wide teacher and student surveys, interviews, focus groups, ethnographic data and experience sampling methods (SEM). (3 Credits) Meets MED & CAGS Concentration requirement: School Climate and Leadership/ Educational Leadership
  • ED 7201 - Internship: Principal I


    This course provides students with an opportunity to experience an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced Principal. Students enrolled in this internship will work for a minimum of 150 hours under the supervision of an experienced, NH State certified principal.  Is required by those seeking principal certification (1 credit)
  • ED 7202 - Internship: Principal II


    This course provides students with an opportunity to experience an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced Principal. Students enrolled in this internship will work for a minimum of 150 hours under the supervision of an experienced, NH State certified principal.  Prerequisites: ED 7201  Principal Internship I. (1 credit)
  • ED 7203 - Internship: Principal III


    This course provides students with an opportunity to experience an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced Principal. Students enrolled in this internship will work for a minimum of 160 hours under the supervision of an experienced, NH State certified principal.  Prerequisites: ED 7202  Principal Internship II. (1 credit)
  • ED 7260 - Applied Education Research


    Every school leader is aware of the myriad issues associated with schools. In addition they are aware of the endless resources that can be used to understand an issue in their school. This course has the student identify a significant school-wide issue, one that requires research about the cause of the problem and possible solution. The student will find scholarly research about the issue and develop an introduction and comprehensive literature review along with reference page. The student will become familiar with action research and develop a plan to collect data about their school-wide issue.  Finally using the data collection plan, students will collect data about their issue. This course is the prerequisite for ED 7510 where the student will take the information, gather data from the school that is pertinent to the issue, develop a comprehensive plan to solve the problem, and share this plan with appropriate school leaders for their approval. (4 Credits) Meets MED CORE requirement
  • ED 7501 - Internship: Superintendent I


    This course provides students with an opportunity to experience an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced Superintendent. Students enrolled in this internship will work to accrue over the three internships a minimum of 1200 hours (a full year) under the supervision of an experienced, NH State certified superintendent. Is required by those seeking superintendent certification Prerequisites: Must complete a majority of courses for Superintendent licensure and have approval of MED Program Director. (1 credit)
  • ED 7502 - Internship: Superintendent II


    This course provides students with an opportunity to experience an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced Superintendent. Students enrolled in this internship will work to accrue over the three internships a minimum of 1200 hours (a full year) under the supervision of an experienced, NH State certified superintendent. Is required by those seeking superintendent certification Prerequisites: Must complete ED 7501  Internship: Superintendent I. (1 credit)
  • ED 7503 - Internship: Superintendent III


    This course provides students with an opportunity to experience an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced Superintendent. Students enrolled in this internship will work to accrue over the three internships a minimum of 1200 hours (a full year) under the supervision of an experienced, NH State certified superintendent. Is required by those seeking superintendent certification Prerequisites: Must complete ED 7502  Internship: Superintendent II. (1 credit)
  • ED 7510 - Data-Driven Leadership and Action Capstone


    As a result of your work in ED 7260 Applied Education Research, you have explored a school-wide issue important to your school, researched scholarly journals and resources about what is currently known about the issue, and ways experts have solved the problem. In this course you will take that information and gather data associated with the problem that is pertinent to your school and the issue. After analyzing that data, you will analyze the data, identify results and discuss your data.  Students will develop a comprehensive plan that is achievable that takes all aspects of the problem and all constituents into consideration. The project and plan will be presented to individuals at your school who have the decision-making ability to accept and implement the plan. (4 Credits) Meets MED CORE requirement
  • ED 7511 - Internship: Business Administrator I


    This course provides students with an opportunity to expereince an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced State of NH School Business Administrator.  Students enrolled in this internship will work to accrue over the two internships a minimum of 150 hours. Prerequisites: Must complete a majority of courses for Business Administrator licensure and have approval of MED/CAGS Program Director. (1 credit)
  • ED 7512 - Internship: Business Administrator II


    This course provides students with an opportunity to experience an educational environment on an extended basis under supervision of an experienced State of NH School Business Administrator.  Students enrolled in this internship will work to accrue over the two internships a minimum of 150 hours. Prerequisites: Must complete a majority of courses in Business Administrator licensure and have approval of MED/CAGS Program Director. (1 credit)
  • ED 8010 (HEA 8010) - Seminar in Educational Research I


    The Educational Research Seminars combine the exploration of the research process with the development of specific qualitative and quantitative research skills. Students will develop fundamental in the use of the statistics, methods, and organizational strategies and data collection tools associated with educational research. The first seminar will also concentrate on developing competency in qualitative research methods. Students will be able to compare and contrast qualitative methodologies, implement data collection methods, and analyze qualitative data. In addition, students will develop the capacity to analyze a variety of types of literature critically. Students will continue to develop their research questions in order to apply their learning to their final research dissertation. Both K‐12 and higher education students take this course together. (4 credits)
  • ED 8020 - Seminar in Critical Issues in the Future of Education


    In this seminar students will develop the skills and knowledge to answer the following essential questions: What critical issues will our students and educational leaders encounter and how can we prepare them to successfully face those issues? How will educational and other organizations have to change to meet the challenges of our changing world? Students will identify, analyze, and problem solve vital issues in education today to the critical issues we foresee in the future of education. This seminar will focus on critical issues in relation to educational organization, pedagogy, curriculum, policies, philosophies, mission, economics, and public policy. Students will begin to develop their critical issues to connect to their dissertations. (4 credits)
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Higher Education Administration


The Master of Science Higher Education Administration program at New England College is an innovative 40‐credit program that combines on campus and experiential instruction designed for students working or seeking to work in higher education. Coursework provides a comprehensive understanding of the theory and practice of higher education administration and covers functional areas and issues critical to effective management in college and university settings including advising and helping skills, multicultural competence, legal issues, organizational and administration, personal and organizational leadership, and research and assessment. Case studies, applied research, field experience, and a capstone project enable students to apply learning immediately to higher education practice and professional development.

The coursework provides a strong foundation in the theory and practice of higher education administration. Students are introduced to a broad range of administrative leadership at 2‐and 4‐year colleges and universities. Graduates pursue careers in academic advising, admissions and enrollment management, fundraising, career placement, financial aid, student affairs, and related fields.

The master’s program in higher education administration at New England College is unique. In this accelerated program comprised of 7‐week terms, students can finish their degree in 10 months if they choose to attend full‐time taking two courses per term. Students can also choose one course at a time if they would like to attend part‐time. While the courses are fast‐paced, knowledge and skill development isn’t compromised. The expert faculty are committed to student learning. There are three possible tracks for higher education program. In the hybrid program students take one class on campus and one class on-line per term, if attending full-time. There is also a fully online track, and a Campus Public Safety Administration concentration.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the MS in Higher Education Administration program will demonstrate:

  • Identify and articulate implications of contemporary issues for higher education administration;
  • Apply administrative, leadership, and management practices to the variety of organizational structures found in diverse institutions of higher education;
  • Employ a broad range of higher education resources and scholarship in program planning, implementation, and assessment;
  • Connect theory to practice, applying course learning to professional work experiences;
  • Make data‐informed decisions and recommendations related to professional practice;
  • Develop and hone effective personal and organizational leadership skills;
  • Effectively advise and help students individual and in group settings;
  • Develop skills and knowledge required to work with diverse individuals and organizations and foster inclusive communities;
  • Demonstrate effective and inclusive written and oral communication skills, and;
  • Think critically to identify, strategize, and solve issues within higher education.

Programs

Major

Certificate

Courses

Education

  • ED 8065 (HEA 8065) - Literature Review Seminar


    The goal of this seminar is to provide students the opportunity to delve deep into the literature regarding their dissertation topic and develop the literature review for their proposal.  (2 credits)
  • ED 8155 (HEA 8155) - Methods and Analysis Seminar


    The goal of this seminar is to provide students the opportunity to extensively study their chosen analysis approach and complete analysis of their data. The final product would be research findings. (2 credits)
  • HEA 8010 (ED 8010) - Seminar in Educational Research I


    The Educational Research Seminars combine the exploration of the research process with the development of specific qualitative and quantitative research skills. Students will develop fundamental in the use of the statistics, methods, and organizational strategies and data collection tools associated with educational research. The first seminar will also concentrate on developing competency in qualitative research methods. Students will be able to compare and contrast qualitative methodologies, implement data collection methods, and analyze qualitative data. In addition, students will develop the capacity to analyze a variety of types of literature critically. Students will continue to develop their research questions in order to apply their learning to their final research dissertation. Both K‐12 and higher education students take this course together. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8020 - Contemporary Issues in Higher Education


    The administration of higher education is fraught with complex debates on topics of concern to internal and external constituencies, and those who work in higher education are required to communicate professional and scholarly positions, institutional commitments, and strategic decisions to a variety of audiences. Students will explore the foundations of higher education through critical analysis of contemporary issues in the field. Students identify contemporary issues and assess potential implications of policy recommendations and administrative decisions in areas such as affordability, access, student needs, and student success. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8030 - Organizational Leadership and Change


    In times of scarce resources and great competition, colleges and universities face growing demands for greater accountability, entrepreneurial leadership, and pedagogical innovation. In this course students will examine organizational change in higher education, with emphases on organizational cultures, constituent perspectives, governance structures, and professional ethics. Students will critique current theories of change and will identify and critique strategies for addressing organizational leadership and change. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8040 (ED8040) - Seminar in Educational Research II


    Students in this seminar will continue in their process to develop their research skills and designs, with an emphasis on quantitative methods. Students will explore and critique various quantitative methodologies and will develop skills to collect and analyze quantitative data. Participants will also continue their review of the literature in relation to their dissertation topic. Students will formalize their research questions and connect their dissertation questions to specific research designs and techniques as well as articulate designs and corresponding data collection tools and analytical processes for their dissertations. Both K‐12 and higher education students take this course together. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8050 - Advanced Student Development


    The development of competencies needed to address and assist diverse populations of students is the focus of the course. In this seminar students will identify, critique, and evaluate student development theories, including those related to identity development, moral and cognitive development, and learning and engagement. Students will apply theoretical knowledge to the development of programs and services that facilitate student development and achievement. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8060 (ED8060) - Dissertation Seminar I


    The dissertation presents an opportunity for students to develop in‐depth expertise in a topic of professional interest and selected research methods. In the dissertation seminars students build on their coursework in educational inquiry and research methods and they structure the dissertation research and writing process. Students will then finalize their research questions, research design, data collection tools, letters of consent and formal proposal. Upon acceptance of the proposal by their committees students will complete their IRB requests for approval. Both K‐12 and higher education students take this course together. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8065 (ED 8065) - Literature Review Seminar


    The goal of this seminar is to provide students the opportunity to delve deep into the literature regarding their dissertation topic and develop the literature review for their proposal.  (2 credits)
  • HEA 8070 - Budgeting and Finance


    This course provides an overview of strategic financial resource management in public and private institutions of higher education. Students will articulate various budgeting approaches, interpret financial statements, develop diversified sources of revenue including auxiliary enterprises and fundraising; analyze costs; and implement budget and control procedures. Simulation exercises will be used to illustrate principles and develop budgeting skills. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8080 - Strategic Management in Higher Education


    Demographic, social, legal, financial, and geographic factors all affect the educational capacity of higher education institutions. In this course students will explore the strategic use of institutional resources and planning to enhance college and university students. Students will increase their knowledge of topics will include enrollment management, external affairs, campus planning, and institutional research. Students will develop the skills to use assessment and other data to plan and facilitate change will also be addressed. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8090 - Public Policy in Higher Education


    This seminar examines the roles of the states, the federal government, coordinating and governing boards, media, scholars, and other interested parties in shaping the public‐policy context of higher education. Students develop the skill in knowledge regarding how to manage and address selected public policy issues and the dynamic political processes that affect higher education. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8100 - Teaching and Learning in Higher Education-Innovative Pedagogies


    This course will examine the philosophical, historical, sociological, and organizational issues that shape academic programs, curriculum development, and co‐curricular initiatives in American higher education. The course will explore recurring tensions that drive curriculum reform and innovative pedagogies that support student learning. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8110 (ED8110) - Dissertation Seminar II


    In this seminar, students will focus on the organization and analysis of data and the writing of the dissertation. Students are expected to have completed their data collection by the beginning of year 3 of the program. In this seminar students will analyze their data and draft their findings and discussion chapters of their dissertation. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8120 (ED 8120) - Promoting Access, Retention and Achievement


    Building on previous coursework in educational policy, student learning and development, and organizational leadership, this course investigates the challenges of access, persistence, and completion from K‐ 12 through postsecondary settings. Students from the K‐12 and higher education administration concentrations will analyze collaboratively issues such as preparation and articulation. Effective strategies for the promotion of access and retention will be explored. Both K‐12 and higher education students take this course together. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8130 - Preventative Law


    Legal issues influence educational and administrative practices on college campuses in direct and indirect ways. Students will articulate the broad scope of higher education law, the contemporary legal environment and general legal principles relevant to higher education, and the role of law and risk management on campus. Through discussion of a diverse range of case law, scholarly literature, and administrative problems and practices with legal implications, students will identify and analyze emerging legal issues and best practices and will develop their problem‐solving, risk management, and supervision skills related to legal issues in higher education. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8140 (ED8140) - Dissertation Completion, Presentation and Action Plan


    In this seminar students will finalize their dissertation and the final dissertation presentation for their committee and their peers. Both K‐12 and higher education students take this course together. (Prerequisite - successful completion of Seminars in Dissertation ED 8060 /HEA 8060  and 8110 and ED 8150 /HEA 8150  Comprehensive Project) (4 credits)
  • HEA 8150 (ED8150) - Comprehensive Project


    The comprehensive project challenges students to synthesize their learning in the doctoral program and their professional experiences. Students will work with their advisors to develop a project plan which integrates at least three areas of learning in the program and will produce a professional product (e.g., scholarly article, business or program plan, policy analysis, curriculum) which demonstrates integrative learning and advanced skill. In this seminar students will finalize their comprehensive project products. Upon acceptance of their comprehensive project proposal, students will prepare their final projects both in a written and presentation formats. Both K‐12 and higher education students take this course together. (4 credits)
  • HEA 8155 (ED 8155) - Methods and Analysis Seminar


    The goal of this seminar is to provide students the opportunity to extensively study their chosen analysis approach and complete analysis of their data. The final product would be research findings. (2 credits)

Higher Education Administration, MS

  • HEA 5110 - Higher Education Organization and Administration


    An understanding of complex systems of organization and governance in higher education is critical to successful administration and leadership. This course is an introduction to administration and organizational dynamics. Although the roles of multiple internal and external constituencies will be considered, the class focuses on institution and system‐wide perspectives but will provide an overview of specific departments or functions. Theories of organizational leadership, culture, change and administrative management will be applied to case studies and individual and group projects. (4 credits)
  • HEA 5130 - College Students in the United States


    Colleges and universities in the United States welcome a diverse array of students who are pursuing multiple educational goals in a variety of educational settings. This course will provide an overview of student participation in higher education, the theories that underlie their personal development (regardless of age), and address the impact of higher education on student learning and development. (4 credits)
  • HEA 5190 - Multicultural Competence


    The college student population in the United States is diversifying at a tremendous rate. Higher education administrators must develop the skills and knowledge to understand and address the implications for higher education resulting from this diversity. This course will provide an introduction to theory and practice of multicultural competence allowing students to apply this skill and knowledge through course assignments. (4 credits)
  • HEA 5320 - Advising and Helping College Students


    Advising are helping are essential skills working within higher education as virtually every administration will have student contact. This course provides and introduction to the theory and practice of advising and helping students individually and group settings. Those skills and knowledge will be critiqued and applied through course assignments. (4 credits)
  • HEA 5370 - Title IX and Clery Compliance


    Complying with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) and the Clery Act requires understanding how to implement a patchwork of laws, regulations, and sub-regulatory guidance to effectively prevent and respond to sex-based discrimination on college and university campuses. The course covers laws, regulations, investigations, and reporting. This course will provide practitioners with the knowledge necessary to build and administer a robust Title IX and Clery Act compliance program at their institutions. (4 credits)
  • HEA 5920 - Campus Public Safety Considerations


    This course will provide a review of special topics in campus public safety administration.  Foundations of behavioral threat assessment and management will be explored as well as issues regarding physical security, weapons on campus and alcohol and other drugs.  Emphasis will be placed on campus public safety administrator’s roles in effectively managing these issues. (2 credits)
  • HEA 6110 - Leadership Theory and Practice in Higher Education I


    Leadership can take a multitude of forms. Regardless of their department or role, higher education administrators are leaders and lead in a variety of ways. This course provides an overview of theory and practice of leadership to enable students to develop and hone knowledge and skills for personal and organizational leadership. (2 credits)
  • HEA 6120 - Leadership Theory and Practice in Higher Education II


    Leadership can take a multitude of forms. Regardless of their department or role, higher education administrators are leaders and lead in a variety of ways. This course provides an overview of theory and practice of leadership to enable students to develop and hone knowledge and skills for personal and organizational leadership. Leadership Theory and Practice II is a continuation of Leadership Theory and Practice I. (2 credits)
  • HEA 6150 - Ethics in Leadership


    Campus public safety administrators are frequently called upon to make strategic and tactical decisions that can impact the stability and well-being of their departments and the communities they serve.  A well-formed philosophy of leadership and an unwavering ethical foundation are essential to making sound decisions.  This course will review pertinent models of decision-making as well as leadership theories and behaviors that can be applied to the campus public safety realm. (2 credits)
  • HEA 6240 - Assessment in Higher Education


    Leaders in higher education must demonstrate the outcomes for their work as well as identify opportunities for improvement. This course provides an overview of selected strategies of inquiry used in investigating problems of practice in higher education. Students will develop skills and knowledge to create outcomes, identify and apply appropriate assessment methods, interpret data, and design an assessment plan. (4 credits)
  • HEA 6250 - Practicum I


    Experience is an essential component to completing the learning skill providing an opportunity for students to apply and adapt course learning to real‐life environments and circumstances. During this course students will be matched up with a college or university department at New England College or a nearby college to practice what they have learned. For students not already employed full‐time, this experience will mirror a traditional internship/practicum. For students working full‐time, the field experience course will be a practically‐based independent study to still provide practical experience in a different setting, but wouldn’t require time significant time away from work. (2 credits) This course is pass/fail.
  • HEA 6260 - Practicum II


    Experience is an essential component to completing the learning skill providing an opportunity for students to apply and adapt course learning to real‐life environments and circumstances. During this course students will be matched up with a college or university department at New England College or a nearby college to practice what they have learned. For students not already employed full‐time, this experience will mirror a traditional internship/practicum. For students working full‐time, the field experience course will be a practically‐based independent study to still provide practical experience in a different setting, but wouldn’t require time significant time away from work. Practicum II is a continuation of Practicum I and will have a final project component that does not exist in Practicum I. (2 credits) This course is pass/fail.
  • HEA 6390 - Contemporary Issues in Higher Education


    The administration of higher education is fraught with complex debates on topics of concern to internal and external constituencies, and those who work in higher education are required to communicate professional and scholarly positions, institutional commitments, and strategic decisions to a variety of audiences. The class explores the foundations of higher education through critical analysis of contemporary issues in the field. Students will assess potential implications of policy recommendation and administrative decisions in areas such as affordability, access, academic freedom, privacy concerns, and commercialization. (4 credits)
  • HEA 6820 - Emergency Management


    Crisis and emergency management are essential competencies for leaders in contemporary campus public safety agencies.  This course will help to equip practitioners with knowledge regarding reducing vulnerabilities to hazards and mitigate against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters affecting college and university campuses.  (4 credits)
  • HEA 6920 - Legal Issues in Higher Education


    This course provides an understanding of the broad scope of higher education law, general legal principles relevant to higher education, and the role of law on campus. Through discussion of a diverse range of administrative problems and practices with legal implications students will become acquainted with emerging legal issues and best practices and will develop administrative and problem‐solving skills related to legal issues in higher education. (4 credits)
  • HEA 6970 - Capstone


    The capstone experience requires a synthesis of theories, conceptual frameworks, and experiential learning throughout the program. Students must develop a research or professional development project that demonstrates evidence‐based decision making, an understanding of specific higher education/professional contexts, and strategic analysis. Students with no fulltime work experience in higher education are advised to integrate experiential learning into their projects. The instructor must approve capstone proposals before students start their projects. At the end of the program, students present their projects to the academic community. (4 credits) This course is pass/fail.

Doctorate of Education


The Doctorate of Education program prepares educators to take leadership roles in improving educational systems and advancing student learning and success. The low residency, three‐year, cohort‐based structure of the program is ideal for working professionals, and the focus on applied research allows participants to have an immediate impact on the quality of education in their work environments. The K‐12 Leadership and Higher Education Administration concentrations allow participants to develop expertise in specific settings and issues. The program will also engage students, faculty, and other members of the education community in integrated inquiry into issues that span our educational systems. This unique combination of deep understanding, expanded vision, and diverse professional networks positions participants for innovative, entrepreneurial leadership in a complex and changing world.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Articulate a personal philosophy of professional practice and a vision for educational organizations which is responsive to societal challenges of complexity, diversity, and social justice
  • Identify and address critical and contemporary issues in educational policy and practice
  • Demonstrate knowledge of administrative, leadership, and management practices and structures found in diverse institutions of education
  • Assess teaching and learning and create strategies to improve professional practice and student learning
  • Use data to inform evidence‐based decision‐making regarding educational issues, enhance professional practice, and promote organizational change and reform
  • Demonstrate skills to work effectively with others, be advocates for members of the learning community, and lead organizational change and reform
  • Demonstrate information and research literacy incorporating of a broad range of education resources and scholarship
  • Design and conduct independent and collaborative research
  • Demonstrate effective and inclusive written and oral communication skills

Students will meet during two weekends in each seven‐week course, at the end of the first and sixth weeks of each course. Each summer the cohort will meet in August to engage in course work, dissertation development, and comprehensive project development. Participants will display proficiency in meeting the program outcomes through the development of a capstone project, the development of a dissertation proposal, and the completion of the dissertation.

Programs

Major

Data Analytics and Business Statistics

Program Overview

With the growth of the digital age businesses and organizations have had access to unprecedented amounts of data.  In order to turn this data into a competitive advantage businesses must develop effective methods to and analyze and interpret vast amounts of information.  Part business management and part data science, Data Analytics is the key to developing methods that unlock the predictive potential of data. 

Data Analytics plays an integral role in determining an organization’s overall strategic direction, and demand for this crucial set of skills is growing globally.  The McKinsey Global Institute expects that demand for business people with deep analytical skills could outstrip current projections of supply by 50% to 60%.  Graduated students can expect to play a greater role in decision making and strategy setting for their current or future organizations, adding significant value: studies show that business that understand how to interpret data outperform competitors by up to 20%.  New England College’s MS in Data Analytics will provide students with frameworks for critically looking at data, interpreting and visualizing data, and applying that knowledge in real-world applications that will shape how 21st century business challenges are addressed. 

Learning Outcomes

  • Learn how to effectively leverage data for strategic decision making
  • Learn methods to evaluate data from acquisition, cleansing, warehousing and final analyses. 
  • Understand ways to leverage internet presence to harvest big data
  • Understand methodologies and tools for collecting data and designing databases
  • Proficiency in interpreting collected data using a variety of statistical tools
  • Execute real-time analytical methods on living datasets to quickly respond to a customers wants and needs

Programs

Major

Engineering Project Management

New England College’s Master of Science in Engineering Project Management program provides engineering professionals with the proven leadership and technical skills needed for today’s rapidly changing global environment.  The curriculum is designed so that engineers can leverage the technical skills learned in school and on the job with a program designed to turn out leaders who can manage project based upon their understanding of organizational dynamics, the process of managing people, strategic management, and financial and accounting skills.

Because of the program’s focus, this 40-credit Masters can be completed in a year for those taking it full time.  The course delivery and structure are specifically designed for working professionals to make the most efficient use of time and to optimize the learning experience.

Program Objectives:

This program is designed for the engineering student or practicing engineer to successfully transition into the management of engineering projects and the management of organizations. Our goal is to provide the knowledge and skills to become a successful manager who is at ease dealing with complex technical information and organizational issues. NEC’s Program will enable students to:

  • Effectively communicate to a variety of stakeholders though a various forms of communications ranging from professional presentations to team meetings, from letters to complex documents.
  • Apply management skills and concepts to identify, analyze, and creatively solve project-based and organizational problems.
  • Apply leadership skills to lead interdisciplinary teams in a variety of situations,
  • Utilize a broad “toolkit” of technical, statistical, financial, risk-assessment, legal, organization, and ethical tools to solve management problems.
  • Be able to use financial and accounting information in the support of tactical and strategic decisions.
  • Understand the managerial skills needed to manage complex projects to successful conclusions.

 

Programs

Major

Courses

Engineering Project Management

  • EPM 5670 - Risk and Decisions Making


    Decisions are rarely made under conditions of certainty. Managers routinely make decisions with imperfect knowledge and where a degree of risk exists. Through cases and projects students will confront making decisions involving risk. While this course is primarily designed to provide students with the quantitative tools necessary to make and articulate these decisions, understanding qualitative frameworks in which decisions are made will also be examined. Prerequisites: MG 6340   (4 Credits)
  • EPM 5901 - Internship in Engineering Project Management 1


    Students apply knowledge and theories gained in class to real world business situations. Students work with co-operating employers on a part-time basis to achieve specific predetermined academic objectives. This internship is designed for the student to work in an office setting rather than in a remote project environment. (Variable Credits 1-4) Maybe repeated for credit. Contract Required.
  • EPM 6770 - Quality Management and Six Sigma


    This course is designed to introduce quality management from the vantage point of Six Sigma. Students will learn about the philosophy underpinning Six Sigma, quantitative and qualitative tools utilized, Six Sigma methodology, and context specific metrics used to measure quality. Prerequisites: MG 6340   (4 Credits)
  • EPM 6970 - Capstone Project


    The capstone experience requires students to integrate principles, theories, and methods learned in the course required through their program. Students creatively analyze, synthesize, and evaluate learned knowledge in the project having a professional focus and communicate the results of the project in a professional level. (4 Credits)
  • EPM 6990 - Topics in Engineering Project Management


    This course is an in depth examination of specific topic relating to project and engineering management. The particular focus is based on the interests of the students and faculty as well as trends in field.  (Variable Credit 2 - 4) May be repeated for credit.

Health Informatics

New England College’s Master of Science in Health Informatics is a 36-credit program, based on the knowledge domains and standards established by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM).  This program prepares students with technical knowledge and organizational management skills to improve access to health data, with special emphasis on electronic health records, and thus contribute to the enhancement of delivery of healthcare across the world.

Programs

Major

Courses

Health Information Management

All undergraduate courses are 4 credits unless otherwise noted.

  • HIM 5110 - Principles of Health Informatics


    An overview of definitions, systems, and challenges in the field of health informatics and its place in the design and management of healthcare systems. Students will study key terminology and analyze the systems behind the use of Electronic Health Records.  The course touches people and organizational aspects of health information systems as well as technology.     (4 credits)
  • HIM 5330 - Information Security in Healthcare


    Multi-user, multi-device network security is essential in healthcare. This course will review the policies associated with patient privacy and the use of electronic records. Students will be introduced to the threats to network security, ways to mitigate these threats, and recovery systems.  The wide variety of policy and technical solutions available to improve data security and patient records will be explored. This course will examine the security issues facing healthcare providers as technology advances.  Prerequisite: HIM 6000 (4 credits)
  • HIM 6000 - Healthcare Technology and Systems


    An in‐depth study of the basic concepts surrounding clinical information systems, with emphasis on electronic health records ‐ terminology and standards, clinical configuration, user interface design, computerized physician order entry, clinical decision support, and clinical reporting. This course introduces concepts dealing with interoperability. The course then focuses on the practical application of these concepts, including implementation, clinical workflow, privacy and security, certification, medical device integration, and community health information exchange. Prerequisite: HIM 5110 (4 credits)
  • HIM 6010 - The Business of Informatics in Healthcare


    The goal of this course is to provide skills and knowledge in the area of business practices relating to Healthcare Information Technology. This includes departmental design and management, capital and operating budgeting, the art of the budget planning process, infrastructure design and strategic planning. Also included in this class is the process of defining system requirement, determination of return on investment, delivery modes (ASP vs. in-house), evaluation of vendors, vendor selection, contractual matters, risk analysis, project management, implementation and support strategies. Within this discussion, the pros and cons of “buy vs. build” will be evaluated. The various types of information systems will be discussed. This will include enterprise systems, developmental systems, data warehouse, and decision support systems. It will also include challenges presented by various regulatory agencies and laws that have been enacted. (4 credits)
  • HIM 6020 - Knowledge Management in Healthcare


    This course explores the relationship between clinical data and clinical knowledge and how organizations develop and deploy them to support improvements in patient care and research. The course content includes topics such as available medical data and how it should be accessed, analyzed, and organized to support evidence-based medicine and research. Throughout the course, students will analyze current and prospective approaches to clinical decision support and expert system development and how to deploy them via new or existing knowledge-management infrastructures. Prerequisite: HIM 5110 (4 credits)
  • HIM 6030 - Comparative Health Systems


    This course will cover the major healthcare around the world. Students will learn to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of various healthcare systems. The course will also examine a number of health care policy issues facing the United States such as rising health care costs, quality of health care services, financing of the health care system, adoption of new technologies, and the role of the public and private sectors in providing health care. The course will begin with a discussion of the different approaches and methods used in comparative health care systems and examine some of the key concepts that will allow for meaningful policy comparisons across countries. The second and main part of the course consists of in depth comparative analysis of different models of health care systems designed to draw conclusions for the United States. (4 credits)
  • HIM 6240 - Research and Evaluation


    Research and development projects in the broad field of biomedical informatics can take many forms, from field studies that improve understanding of the tasks and information needs of users, to development projects that design, build, and deploy information systems, to studies that assess the impact of information systems on health care processes and outcomes. This course provides an overview of the concepts, vocabularies, and strategies needed to design and evaluate projects in biomedical informatics, including a breadth of methodologies drawn from qualitative research, quantitative research, and software engineering. Prerequisite: HIM 5110 (4 credits)

Healthcare Administration

  • HCA 5110 (HIM 5110) - Principles of Health Informatics


    This course introduces the history and current status of information systems in health care, and introduces students to the study of information technology and information management concepts relevant to the delivery of high quality and cost-effective healthcare. Theoretical frameworks such as data management, decision support, strategic planning and implementation, change management, knowledge management and privacy and other ethical aspects of health informatics are included. (4 credits)
  • HCA 6130 - Comparative Healthcare Systems


    This course will cover the major models for provision and financing of health care used in America, with a couple of international cases for comparison. Students will learn to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of various ways of organizing and financing health care and to evaluate health policies according to a range of criteria for cost, quality and equity. The course will also examine a number of health care policy issues facing the United States such as rising health care costs, quality of health care services, financing of the health care system, adoption of new technologies, and the role of the public and private sectors in providing health care. (4 credits)

International Relations

Program Overview

The field of International Relations continues to develop rapidly in response to dramatic global changes. The 36-credit NEC MA in International Relations prepares graduates to evaluate and analyze relevant global issues and area studies expertise. Graduates grounded in the facts of the past, skilled in the debates of the present, and able to anticipate patterns of future development, will be crucial in shaping responses to global change. The Master of Arts in International Relations at NEC is a practical program, preparing students to face the challenges of an evolving international political landscape. Coursework covers central issues such as globalization, international security, terrorism, international political economy and American Foreign Policy. Graduates emerge with expertise in a range of contemporary issues.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the Master of Arts in International Relations will be able to:

  • Develop a working knowledge of several subfields of the discipline, such as International Relations Theory, Comparative Politics, Area Studies, and International Security;
  • Carry out research in the broad field of international relations and related sub-topics;
  • Analyze international events and issues and propose options to resolve conflicts and policy matters in the international arena;
  • Apply and critique theories and models of international relations to the practice of international affairs;
  • Demonstrate effective written, oral, and online communication skills;
  • Understand, analyze and propose resolutions to ethical issues in international relations;
  • Become effective practitioners in the field of international relations.
  • Write and present significant works of research and policy documents, as reflected in the preparation of a thesis or capstone at the end of the program.

Programs

Major

Courses

International Relations

  • PO 5250 - International Relations Theory


    This course is a graduate-level introduction to contemporary theories and problems in international relations. The objectives of this course are (a) to introduce students to mainstream theories of international relations; (b) to assess the explanatory power of these theories and examine how to apply them to the study of international politics; and (c) to demonstrate how these theories can be used to formulate foreign policy. The main theories discussed in this course include realism and liberalism as well as the postmodern discussion of international relations. (4 Credits)
  • PO 5410 - International Political Economy


    This course examines the politics of global economic relations. It will focus on issues of international trade, the international monetary system, development and foreign investment and the relationship of each to the international economic system and globalization. Among the specific topics to be discussed are: trade and protectionism, the role and performance of global institutions such as the IMF, World Bank, and WTO in a globalized world, the significance of multinational corporations on globalization, efforts at regional economic integration such as the EU and NAFTA, the relationship of the world economy and globalization to the economic development of poor countries, and the emergence of new economic players such as China and India. (4 Credits)
  • PO 5850 - International Security


    This course examines international security in a broad context. Beginning with notions of national security and domestic sources of foreign policy, it will expand to include analysis of timely security issues such as the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, ballistic missile defense, arms control and disarmament, arms sales, and the military industrial complex. (4 Credits)
  • PO 5910 - Terrorism


    This course is designed to introduce students to the study of terrorism and its challenges for national security. Students will explore numerous features of the subject including, but not limited to, definitional dilemmas, the origins and evolution of terrorism, tactical and targeting innovation, the psychology and characteristics of terrorist actors, including women, case studies (e.g. Palestine, Sri Lanka, Colombia, Ireland, North America), and counter-terrorism strategies.  Both international and domestic terrorist actors will be explored. (4 Credits)
  • PO 5990 - Topics Course


    Topics for this course will vary from term to term. Special topics of particular interest to public policy and international relations will be explored within the context of student generated assignments.

    Here is an example of a few of the course types:

    International Organizations                                                                                    

    This course looks at the role international organizations play in the international system.  The emphasis is on the development of international organizations and their proliferation. Entities such as the United Nations and the European Union are included along with other regional organizations, NGO’s, and PVO’s.

     

    International Development                                                                                      

    This course is designed to build a core understanding of the most basic models used in development (and in the developmental discourse) as well as expose you to the many themes of development. This course will also look at the role actors in the international system play in development. The course - just like the problems of development themselves - is multi-disciplinary. The course draws on history, economics, and politics to discuss the problems and prospects of development.

     

    Women and Development                                                                                       

    This course examines the politics and policies of international development from a gender-sensitive perspective.  The course assumes that the term “development” must be understood within an historical and political context, and that development affects women and men, rural and urban people, rich and poor, differently.  We will explore the following: the meanings, history, and political context of development; the uneven impact of development and specific issues that illustrate this uneven impact; and development policies and organizations.

     

    International Law                                                                                                    

    International law commonly is defined as the rules, principles, and norms which govern the interaction among states. In this course, we will investigate the basic question underlying this debate over the utility of international law: does international law act as a constraint on state autonomy, or is it merely used by states when it is in their self-interest? In an effort to address this question, we will focus on the fundamental principles of international law, sovereignty and non-intervention, and will consider whether these principles have been eroded in recent decades as a result of growing support for new international legal norms, including human rights.

     

    Collective Security and Peacekeeping                                                                    

    This course explores the origins of the idea of collective security, examines the attempts to organize international security collectively, and assesses possibilities and opportunities for collective security arrangements after the Cold War.

     

    Global Change and US Foreign Policy                                                                  

    This course examines the transformation of the U.S. role in the post Cold War world. Specific attention is paid to the political, economic, environmental, and cultural changes affecting the role the US plays globally today. (4 Credits)

  • PO 6550 - U.S. Foreign Policy


    This course will provide an analysis of American foreign policy from the perspectives of both domestic American politics and international relations. Policy with reference to the Soviet Union, the Third World, political and military allies, terrorism, nuclear and conventional weapons, international organizations and human rights are considered as they relate to specific presidencies.  There will also be a discussion of post-9/11 US foreign policy and its differences from Cold War and post-Cold War world policies.

      (4 Credits)

Management


New England College’s Master of Science in Management offers academics and working professionals the skills required to effectively manage human capital within a variety of organizations.   Our student-centered approach fosters a collaborative and supportive learning environment that will further students’ theoretical and practical knowledge in managing an organizations most valuable asset: people.   Students will develop strong foundations in communication, strategic thinking, and organizational leadership, skills that can help further a career or launch a career in a new direction. 

This 36-credit MSM can be completed in two years, part-time.  The course delivery and structure are specifically designed for flexibility, allowing students the most efficient use of time and the ability to optimize the learning experience.   Students pursuing their MSM will take 16 core credits coupled with 20 credits of concentration classes.  Students have the option to select from a diverse range of defined concentrations, including Healthcare Administration, Non-Profit Leadership, Real Estate Management, and Sustainability (for a full listing of courses please see below).  In addition, students can opt to custom build a course of study and select 20 credits from across the concentration offerings.

Who Should Enroll in the MSM Program?

  • Current managers with any level of experience
  • Individuals wishing to move into a management role  
  • Anyone seeking tactical management and organizational skills
  • Anyone looking to add theoretical and leadership components to their current skill set
  • Working professionals who wish to blend management principles with concentration-specific topics

Program Sequence

•Seven entry points per year   

•100% online

Career and Professional Development Opportunities

The Master of Science in Management degree provides professionals an opportunity to increase their potential for advancement to management and supervisory positions among other leadership roles within an organization. The link between theory and practical experience obtained from an MSM degree is very attractive to potential employers. In general, earning an MSM can help increase earning potential. It can also be helpful to entrepreneurs who wish to manage a business.  Job titles can include management opportunities in many sectors: Human Resources, Administrative Services, Advertising, Public Relations, General Operations, Organizational Development, Security, Health Care, Public Administration, Real Estate Management, Sustainability, Sales Management, Training and Development, etc.

For those who wish to take on supervisory roles, or who already serve in these roles and want to progress to leadership positions, the MSM degree can provide helpful skills such as how to predict and manage organizational conflicts, continuously improve a team’s effectiveness, and how to lead ethical decision-making processes.

According to CareerBliss, a master’s degree pays off for those who are aiming for the job title of general manager. General managers with only a four-year degree earn, on average, $79,818.09. Those with a master’s do 17.92 percent better, earning $97,246.27.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the program, students should be able to:

  •  Carry out applied research in management and business fields, based on theoretical and methodological soundness
  • Apply tools and techniques in budgeting, accounting and finance, and enhance decision-making abilities with an understanding of financial implications of business and managerial decisions
  • Manage organizational conflicts to achieve productive resolution
  • Continuously improve a team’s effectiveness
  • Lead ethical decision-making processes
  • Apply knowledge, skills, and tools to specialized fields chosen by the students who choose concentrations

Programs

Major

Courses

Environmental Studies and Sustainability

  • ES 5510 - Sustainability: Principles and Models


    This course sets the landscape of sustainability theories and case studies of sustainability in practice for creating long-term competitive advantage and growth that takes into account the environment, the business model, and the impact of the organization in the social and economic wellbeing of the communities affected by the presence and activity of private, not for profit, and government agencies. The course will focus on the discussion of the triple‐bottom line: people, planet, and profits, and will extend the analysis to the quadruple bottom line as a recently emerging trend in sustainability management. (4 credits)
  • ES 5650 - Sustainable Communities


    Sustainable urban development practices aiming at building and fostering sustainable communities. The course investigates how multiple demographic, socio‐cultural, political, economic, technological and environmental forces intertwine to shape community development practices locally, nationally and globally. The course focuses on an in‐depth analysis on the impact of corporations in local communities and how the private and public sectors, together with not for profit organizations, can work together to foster well‐being and community development in the regions where they operate. (4 Credits)
  • ES 5850 - Sustainability in Practice: Renewable Energy


    An overview of traditional and alternative energy sources, with a special focus on renewable energies. The course intends to provide students with a deep understanding of the technologies associated with renewable and sustainable sources energy. This includes hydropower, solar, wind, hydrogen, among others. Course content also addresses operational issues associated with production, storage, transportation, distribution use of energy, as well as discussing the trade‐offs of various forms energy in terms of their technological merits and economic viability. (4 Credits)
  • ES 6250 - Sustainability in Practice: Natural Resources, Environmental Law


    Environmental Law affects all components of sustainable business management. This course addresses how companies need to address issues in water use and pollution, air permits, hazardous waste Clean Air Act regulations and requirements, real estate construction and transaction issues, and environmental litigation. Business managers and leaders must develop a solid understanding of vital rules and regulations associated with Environmental Law. Of particular importance is the discussion of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and of constantly evolving legal issues that affect sustainable business practices. (4 Credits)
  • ES 6610 - Value Chain and Operations Strategy


    Strategic effectiveness requires two basic components: strategic design and strategy implementation. This course emphasizes the effective execution of strategy by discussing the multiple dimensions of operational management in sustainable operations. In addition to learning traditional operational concepts such as operational strategy, process and supply chain management, production and inventory management, and quality management tools such as Six Sigma and TQM, students will discover principles, tools and techniques associated with growing fields such as business re‐engineering, green management and industrial ecology. (4 Credits)

Management

  • MG 5110 - Organizational Management and Leadership


    This course combines theory and practice by encouraging students to learn traditional and contemporary leadership theories and apply them to the analysis of the behavior or leaders, colleagues, and subordinates. Through a variety of readings, cases, and exercises, students will examine numerous effective leadership models. Topics include the evolution of leadership; the leadership roles of strategy, vision and transformational change; the development of leaders; the leadership responsibilities of creating effective teams, organizations and cultures; the exploration of different leadership styles; and current popular approaches to leadership theory. (4 credits)
  • MG 5120 - Organizational Leadership and Change


    This course combines theory and practice by encouraging students to learn traditional and contemporary leadership theories and apply them to the analysis of the behavior or leaders, colleagues, and subordinates.  Through a variety of readings, cases, and exercises, students will examine numerous effective leadership models. Students will examine organizational communication including formal and informal communication, as well as the relationship of communication to organizational satisfaction and effectiveness. Topics include the leadership responsibilities of creating effective teams, organizations and cultures; the exploration of different leadership styles; and preparing and implementing negotiation processes. (4 credits)
  • MG 5220 - Customer Relationship Management


    This course focuses on CRM at a strategic marketing level. The goal is to use customer information to build customer loyalty and relationships. Applying differential attention to more valuable customers improves both customer satisfaction and the firm’s bottom line. Built around the notion of the customer lifecycle, this course emphasizes analytical approaches to customer relationship management. Topics include identifying good prospects and customer acquisition; customer development via up‐selling, cross-selling and personalization; customer attrition and retention; and customer lifetime value. (4 credits)
  • MG 5230 - Relationship Selling Strategies


    This course allows students the ability to become familiar with the selling environment. A decision making perspective is accomplished through a modular format that consists of the discussion and analysis of basic concepts, identifying critical decision areas and presenting analytical approaches for improved professional selling and sales management initiatives as they apply to customer satisfaction strategies. (4 credits)
  • MG 5235 - Sustainable Enterprise and Innovation


    Students will look at newly emerging and innovative business models that seek to balance complex environmental and social needs with financial viability: in other words the “triple bottom line” of financial strength, environmental sustainability, and social equity.   Using a series of case studies and class projects a new framework for “doing business as usual” will be developed, leaving students with an understanding of what tools work best, how these tools can be modified, and where new tools are needed. This course also involves elements of self-reflection intended to build stronger moral leaders, who can lead through “times of uncertainty with no clear answers.” Using leadership modules, critical reading, reflection exercises students can expect to have their understanding of business challenged, the world challenged and critical tools and frameworks will be introduced to help navigate these challenges. (4 Credits)
  • MG 5260 - Managing Growth


    This course is devoted to the planning for and management of growth. Through cases and projects students will learn about creating the right culture for growth as well as managing the systems that need to exist as a firm grows from a small to medium businesses. This course will examine functional areas of business within the context of the transition from a startup to a successful rapidly growing concern. (4 credits)
  • MG 5310 - Strategic Marketing


    The goal of this course is to introduce financial decision-making and management techniques in a firm, including its relationship to financial markets and institutions and the impact of marketing on the firms overall strategy.  Topics include:  balance sheet analysis, capital budgeting, working capital management, capital structure of the enterprise, business valuation and managing risk. (4 credits)
  • MG 5320 - Marketing Management in Healthcare and Service Sectors


    The course introduces fundamental marketing principles then layers issues specific to service industries, health organizations, and fund raising structures. Students will develop a foundational knowledge of marketing concepts and practices, marketing decision‐making techniques, sources of financial support and strategies for their development and apply that knowledge in the healthcare or services industry. (4 credits)
  • MG 5330 - Market Research


    This course provides an overview of information needs of the marketing decision-maker. Emphasis is on methods and techniques that may be employed for the collection and analysis of primary data. Major topics include design of research projects, generating primary data, questionnaire design, sampling for survey research, experimental design, controlling data collection, and data analysis. (4 credits)
  • MG 5360 - Strategic Sales Management


    This course provides students with the tools to develop, implement, and analyze a strategic sales plan.  Students will learn how to recognize the strengths and weaknesses of forecasting techniques as well as how to hire and incent a sales force to achieve sales goals.  Emphasis will be placed on identification of potential customers and the strategic allocation of resources to effectively reach those customers.  Students will review Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Software as well as successful tools for sales negotiations.  Eligible students can use the knowledge gained in this course to sit for the Certified Sales Executive exam. (4 credits)
  • MG 5410 - Organizational Communication, Negotiation & Conflict Resolution


    This course explores the psychological contract between leader and follower that take any of many forms between two people or between the leader and small groups. Students study group formation and group development as well as the intricacies of coaching, mentoring, conflict resolution and mentoring. Students study organizational behavior and explore how these concepts affect leadership effectiveness. Students will examine organizational communication including formal and informal communication, as well as the relationship of communication to organizational satisfaction and effectiveness. Topics include: preparing for a negotiation, understanding individual preferences, identifying ethical and cross-cultural issues that might arise, and when and what kind of outside resources may be and assess the importance of coaching and open communication when inspiring individuals to overcome barriers to peak performance. (4 credits)
  • MG 5500 - Data Driven Decision Making


    This course introduces students to key methods used to extract information from large datasets and apply that data to business problems.  Students will learn how to identify quality data using key concepts like classification, data reduction, and model comparison, and interpret that data using tools like decision trees and logistic regressions.   In addition, data preparation and visualization techniques are addressed to provide students with skills in visual representation methods. (4 credits)
  • MG 5610 - Economics for Leaders


    This course will develop students’ capacity to analyze the economic environment and to employ economic analyses when making key management decisions.  Students will review how economics impacts the way in which an organization operates, to understand the constraints this environment places on the organization’s pursuit of its goals, how these constraints may change with time, and to apply economic reasoning to internal decision making.  Students will examine a variety of issues including:  activity based costing, cost estimation, relevant costs and pricing policies. (4 credits)
  • MG 5615 - Global Economy


    This course provides students with the knowledge and analytical tools necessary to understand international trading relationships and their effects. These issues will be studied using the analytical tools and concepts of international economics. Case studies will be used to implement these concepts in practice. (4 credits)
  • MG 5620 - Managerial Economics


    This course will develop students’ capacity to analyze the economic environment in which an organization operates, to understand the constraints this environment places on the organization’s pursuit of its goals, how these constraints may change with time, and to apply economic reasoning to internal decision making. Students will examine a variety of issues including: activity based costing, cost estimation, relevant costs and pricing policies. (4 credits)
  • MG 5640 - Finance for Leaders


    Introduction to tools of financial analysis and problems of financial management, including cash, profitability, and capital budgeting. Various sources of corporate funds are considered, including short, intermediate, and long‐term arrangements. (4 Credits)
  • MG 5660 - Business Law


    Application of law to managerial decisions and the relationship between legal and business strategy examining the role of the courts; litigation and alternative dispute resolutions; fundamentals of contract, tort, and criminal law; government regulation of business; legal forms of business organizations; ethical considerations in business; international business transactions. (4 credits)
  • MG 5730 - Talent Acquisition and Talent Management


    From strategic planning to acquiring talent to performance management and succession planning, this course will teach the elements of talent management within a framework that uses concrete examples, real language, and an eye towards current application. (4 credits)
  • MG 5830 - Designing Innovation and Developing the Venture


    Innovation does not happen by chance; this course will examines strategies used to develop, encourage, and assess innovation. The course examines the process of screening ideas and then taking an idea from concept to start up. By the end of the course, students should understand the process involved in transforming a concept into a viable concern.   (4 credits)
  • MG 5836 - Information Systems in HR Management


    Students will gain exposure to current HR management information systems used across a variety of sectors.  Emphasis will be placed on how these systems can facilitate more effective team communication, build more robust platforms for analyzing HR approaches, and support the overall strategy direction of a firm. (4 credits)
  • MG 5990 - Grant Writing and Contract Management


    This course examines the use of contracts and grants in providing social services. Explores the theoretical background of government contracts and grants; the management of third-party services from the perspectives of government agencies, private sector contractors, and nonprofit organizations; and the skills needed to write effective grant and contract proposals. (4 credits)
  • MG 5990 - Special Topics: Quality and Lean for Healthcare


    This course focuses on the tools and philosophies applied to create a total quality work environment. Emphasis is on improving leadership capabilities, employee/team performance. The term “Lean Manufacturing” is used to describe a business philosophy whose ultimate aim is to meetthe needs of the customer by efficiently providing a defect-free product in a timely fashion through the elimination of waste. Waste is broadly defined and considered to be any activity, delay, or resource consumed that does not directly add value toward meeting the needs of a customer. Students will have oppurtunities to analyze and apply lean concepts and tools in a healthcare environment. (4 credits)
  • MG 6040 - Research Methods


    This course will provide an overview of graduate level research for the capstone project in both the Master of Science in Management and the Master of Arts in Public Policy. Students will learn about the various methods of research in the discipline, research design, and proper formatting and writing of formal papers. Specific focus will be placed on topic development, developing a research outline, conducting a literature review, constructing an annotated bibliography, and proper citation styles that make use of the Chicago Manual of Style (for MAPP students) and the APA style (for MSM students). This course will provide all students the tools to do research and, in addition, will prepare them for the final capstone project to be developed in the subsequent Strategic Capstone course. (2 credits)
  • MG 6060 - Real Estate Market and Feasibility Analysis


    This course introduces students to the real estate analysis and valuation. Specific topics will include property asset and space markets, real estate development, and market analysis methods techniques to evaluate project feasibility. Students explore what drives the demand for development and potential political, legal and regulatory challenges. (4 Credits)
  • MG 6090 - Compensation and Benefits


    The purpose of this course is to help students develop their skills and knowledge in compensation and benefits. Topics covered in the course include benefits, Affordable Health Care Act, overview of philosophies of compensation, total compensation, global and domestic compensation issues, job analysis, compensation analysis, market surveys, and survey data analysis. (4 credits)
  • MG 6110 - Project Management


    This course presents an overview of managing a project from start to finish, including planning, executing, monitoring, and controlling. Areas covered include project organizational structure, work breakdown structure, scheduling, budgeting, costing, resource allocation, and human resource dimensions such as staffing, negotiations, and conflict resolution throughout the project process. (4 credits)
  • MG 6120 - Quality and Lean for Healthcare


    This course focuses on the tools and philosophies applied to create a total quality work environment. Emphasis on improving leadership capabilities, employee / team performance, The term “Lean manufacturing” is used to describe a business philosophy whose ultimate aim is to meet the needs of the customer by efficiently providing a defect-free product in a timely fashion through the elimination of waste. Waste is broadly defined and considered to be any activity, delay, or resource consumed that does not directly add value toward meeting the needs of a customer. Students will have opportunities to analyze and apply lean concepts and tools in a healthcare environment. (4 credits)
  • MG 6210 - Managing Global Operations


    This course addresses issues and problems related to managing global operations and current practices. Topics include international operations comparisons, international operations improvement and competitive leverage, issues critical to global operations, international cross‐ functional coordination, coordinating international material flow, coordinating international process and product design, and leading global initiatives. (4 credits)
  • MG 6226 - Digital and Internet Marketing Analytics


    This class focuses on how to leverage strategic marketing concepts and tools to grow brand value in a digital environment. Students will learn the fundamentals of web crawling, search engine optimization, social media marketing, and digital marketing analytics in order to process and analyze data and use it to create effective marketing campaigns. (4 credits)
  • MG 6230 - Technology and the Art of the Sale


    With the growth of social media and the digital age customers now have unprecedented access to information, a new reality that is changing the way salespeople do their jobs.  Salespeople must now shift the focus from “selling to serving” customers in order to provide the marginal value necessary to build customer loyalty.  In this course students will review the psychology of sales from the perspective of this new reality, exploring how this has shaped buyer behavior.  Students will learn how to successfully leverage technology to their advantage and negotiate a sale in this constantly shifting environment.  Emphasis will be placed on a range of likely sales venues, ranging from social media to a conference. (4 credits)
  • MG 6315 - Real Estate Finance


    This course provides focus on investment and financing issues in real estate. Project evaluation, financing strategies, investment decision making and real estate capital markets are examined. The impact of the financing decisions on real estate investment risks and return, and various real estate financing techniques will also be covered. Specific topics include: legal considerations in real estate finance, present value concepts, fixed rate mortgage loans, adjustable rate and variable payment mortgages, underwriting and financing residential properties, income-producing properties and valuation fundamentals, leases, projecting cash flows, investment value, investment and risk analysis, financial leverage and financing alternatives. (4 Credits)
  • MG 6320 - Principals of Finance and Insurance


    This course incorporates managerial finance and concepts of insurance. Topics include the nature of risks, types of insurance carriers and markets, insurance contracts and policies, property and casualty coverage’s, life and health insurance, and government regulations. The functions of underwriting, setting premiums, risk analysis, loss prevention, and financial administration of carriers are emphasized. (4 credits)
  • MG 6340 - Applied Business Statistics I


    This course presents fundamentals of probability and provides an overview of the statistical tools and methodologies in the context of business strategy and project management. Topics include probabilistic decision making, hypothesis testing, statistical quality control, and regression analysis. This is a case-based course which allows students to apply their knowledge to specific problems.  *Requires statistical software package (4 Credits)
  • MG 6350 (FI6350) - International Finance


    This course examines the effect of political and economic factors on the financial decision-making of the firm, looking at spectrum of risks arising from a firm’s international operations. Students become familiar with how the international financial system works. (4 credits)
  • MG 6410 - Professional and Organizational Ethics


    This course explores and analyzes the interrelationships among stakeholders in the healthcare industry. The moral implications of the healthcare organization and its decisions are explored with respect to their social effects, and the tension that exists between achieving desirable outcomes and attending to the means by which they are achieved. Topics include: theories of morality; analysis of ethical decision‐making; interaction and conflicts among personal, professional, and organizational values; the effect of cultural diversity on individual and group values; current issues; and the impact of ethical considerations on healthcare organizations. Individual and collective choices, and how they figure in the management of competitive environments and the organization’s position on contemporary moral issues will be explored. (4 credits)
  • MG 6420 Healthcare Informatics - Issues in Ethics for Healthcare


    This course explores and analyzes the interrelationships among stakeholders in the healthcare industry.   The moral implications of the healthcare organization and its decisions are explored with respect to their social effects, and the tension that exists between achieving desirable outcomes and attending to the means by which they are achieved.  Topics include: theories of morality; analysis of ethical decision-making; interaction and conflicts among personal, professional, and organizational values; the effect of cultural diversity on individual and group values; current issues; and the impact of ethical considerations on healthcare organizations. (4 credits)
  • MG 6500 - Data Visualization


    Visualizations are graphical depictions of data that can improve comprehension, communication, and decision making. In this course, students will learn visual representation methods and techniques that increase the understanding of complex data and models. Emphasis will be placed on the identification of patterns. (4 credits)
  • MG 6520 - Grant Writing and Contract Management


    This course examines the use of contracts and grants in providing social services. Explores the theoretical background of government contracts and grants; the management of third‐party services from the perspectives of government agencies, private sector contractors, and nonprofit organizations; and the skills needed to write effective grant and contract proposals. (4 credits)
  • MG 6610 - Strategic Planning and Policy


    This course will examine the process of strategic planning. Organizations are undergoing a series of revolutionary changes, including vertical integration, horizontal consolidation, strategic alliances and joint ventures, entrepreneurial startups, and specialized niche networks. This course will critically examine changes and discuss the various strategic decisions and managerial skills needed to confront them in a variety of firms in organizations. The primary focus of the course is on the strategy of the business unit, which is the foundational level for competitive analysis, and an analysis of the issues central to the firm’s short‐term and long‐term competitive success. Using a combination of case studies and industry field research, students will assume the roles of key decision‐makers and/or advisors in analyzing these issues and offering recommendations for strategic change. (4 credits)
  • MG 6630 - Strategic Fundraising


    This course presents the techniques and strategies behind successful non‐profit fundraising in the areas of planning, budgeting, control and other activities in the context of the non‐profit institution. Fundraising is more of an art rather than a science because fundraising is about people, personalities, and personal relationships. Topics include: identification and evaluation of potential donors, development of strategies, differentiating your organization, and developing a comprehensive plan. (4 credits)
  • MG 6640 - Dynamics of Nonprofit Governance


    This course examines the new trends and standards in the area of nonprofit governance. It is designed to explore policy issues associated with governance issues, as well as provide practical to those in nonprofit management. The structure of non‐profits in relation to board composition and arrangement are examined. Topics include interactivity with the executive director and staff, board development, board management, committee operation and responsibility. (4 credits)
  • MG 6725 - Facilities Management


    This course familiarizes the student with the business of Facilities Management as it pertains to senior managers. It introduces the concepts of operations and maintenance technology, management of people and the administration of real estate and construction projects. Facility Management is an exciting and ever‐changing filed. This course also emphasizes that successful facility mangers possess high leadership and organizational qualities. (4 credits)
  • MG 6740 - Financing the Venture


    This course is designed to explore the range of financing options available to the entrepreneur. Through case studies and projects, students will explore traditional (e.g. SBA loans, venture capital, export financing) and emerging ways (e.g. crowd funding) to secure the funds necessary to finance the startup and growing concern. Students will examine the impact of the various financing options on the operations of the firm.  (4 credits)
  • MG 6811 - Advertisement and Promotion


    This course provides an understanding of key concepts in IMC (Integrated Marketing Communications) and IMC Management through how the major types of marketing communications messages are created and delivered. This will provide a theoretical foundation for strategic brand management and the tools to implement marketing communications. Assignments are designed after “real world” scenarios.  (4 credits)
  • MG 6830 - Strategic Human Resource Management


    This course is based on a proactive approach to the management of people and resources. Using their workplace as the starting point, students will walk through a strategic, competency‐based facilitation model of human resource management and will deal with practical aspects of managing people in the workplace in activities ranging from the assessment of the global environment to the identification of staffing needs and competencies that impact human resource decisions. This course covers the basics in the functional areas of HR: job analysis, staffing, job design, training, performance appraisal, compensation, succession planning, work‐life balance and termination. Emphasizes the strategic rather than the administrative role of HR and, therefore, its thrust will be HR as a business partner to gain and sustain a competitive advantage. Students will examine the role of socio‐technical systems and its interaction with human resources and all stakeholders (human element) in relation to moving the organization forward. (4 credits)
  • MG 6880 - Supply Chain Management


    This course examines the concept of logistics management from the perspective of competitive strategy, costs and performance, and benchmarking. The course will also discuss recent innovations in supply chain management, such as “just‐in‐time” and “quick response” methodologies. Strategic, tactical and operation decisions in supply chains will be examined as well as Internet-enabled supply chains including: customer relationship management ERP and supply chain automation and integration. (4 credits)
  • MG 6890 - Quality Analysis for Technology


    The course focuses on the tools required to create a total quality work environment. Emphasis is on improving leadership abilities, employee involvement/teamwork, and initiating performance management techniques to measure progression. Troubleshooting techniques are discussed to assist when a team is at an impasse. In addition, quantifiable processes are introduced to measure performance viability of different processes through statistical quality controls including: ISO 9000, 9001, 9002 from a managerial perspective. (4 credits)
  • MG 6920 - Legal Issues in Healthcare


    The purpose of this course is to examine the background, foundation, and ethical aspects of the United States’ legal system and the role of the legal and political environment as it affects the health care industry. Topics include: liability, negligence, taxation, antitrust, compliance, and emergency care. This course will examine contemporary issues affecting the industry and local facilities. (4 credits)
  • MG 6940 - Applied Business Statistics II


    Picking up where Applied Business Statistics ends, this course will further explore statistical tools used in strategic decision making like conjoint analysis and multi-dimensional scaling, stochastic control and noise theory. Using “real-world” problems, students will develop frameworks for cause-and-effect logic that supports predictive analysis for developing suitable hypotheses. Emphasis is placed not just on gathering data but also on the interpretation of data and the limitations of each tool. Prerequisite: MG 6340   (4 Credits)
  • MG 6950 - Contract Management


    This course introduces the student to the contract management process from both buyer and seller perspectives, from pre‐RFP planning, proposal development, and negotiation through contract administration and closeout. Using the work breakdown structure as a framework for planning, the course explains all typical major tasks, responsibilities, and customer interfaces. (4 credits)
  • MG 6970 - Capstone Project


    This capstone experience requires students to integrate principles, theories, and methods learned in courses required through their program.  Students creatively analyze, synthesize, and evaluate learned knowledge in the project having a professional focus and communicate the results of the project effectively at a professional level.

      Prerequisites: Complettion of MBA Core Courses. Offered every other term ONLINE to meet the needs of students who begin their program at different times. (4 credits)

  • MG 6975 - Strategic Capstone


    The Capstone project provides an integrative experience in developing an actual program or solution to an organization problem. Students assume responsibility for all components of completing the paper, from selecting the topic, researching the literature, preparing a research design and writing solutions while working closely with their instructor and a peer partner to complete the paper. The capstone experience requires students to integrate principles, theories, and methods learned in prior courses required throughout their program. Students creatively analyze, synthesize, and evaluate learned knowledge in the project having a professional focus and communicate the results of the project effectively at a professional level. (2 credits) Note: For MBA program MG 6040 and MG 6975 are combined into one 4‐ credit class.
  • MG 6976 - Capstone Project


    This capstone experience requires students to integrate principles, theories, and methods learned in courses required through their program. Students creatively analyze, synthesize, and evaluate learned knowledge in the project having a professional focus and communicate the results of the project effectively at a professional level.   (4 credits)
  • MG 7320 - Statistical Modeling for Managers


    This course trains students to apply statistical tools towards building robust predictive models.  This is a hands-on course that focuses on using Excel to build optimization and simulation models with a variety of applications from finance to marketing. Students will become familiar with methods such as Parametric and non-parametric statistical tests, Generalized Linear Modeling techniques, Data-reduction techniques, Recursive and non-recursive models and Neutral networks. (4 credits)

Sport and Recreation Management

  • SM 5540 - Marketing and Communications in Sport


    Community, college and professional sports programs exist in a dynamic and market based environment. This course is designed to examine marketing and communication theory as it relates to sport. The use of cases will be emphasized and students are expected to develop and present marketing and communication plans in the context of the situations. (4 credits)
  • SM 5750 - Management and Practice in Sports and Recreation


    This course examines effective management practices of sport and recreation; including facility and event management, organizational structure and governance, hiring practices, policy development, diversity, and financial principles. The main focus of these topics will be with regard to the profession of intercollegiate coaching and the practical application of the topics covered. (4 credits)
  • SM 6390 - Current Issues in Sports and Recreation Management


    This course is designed to present current issues in sport with intent to facilitate discussion and thinking about how organizations and leaders might respond to these issues. Course content will be presented with the intent of stimulating discussion. Critical thinking with regard to controversial subjects will be encouraged. Topics may include gender equity, substance use, racial equity, and sporting behavior of players and fans. (4 credits)
  • SM 6710 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Sports


    This course explores relevant legal issues as they relate to amateur and professional sport, including tort law, contracts and statutory law. Additionally, as leaders in sport are asked to make ethical decisions, this course will examine ethical decision making and the influence of relevant stakeholders on the decision process. (4 credits)

Professional Writing


The New England College Master of Arts (MA) in Professional Writing is an accelerated 12‐month online program for aspiring writers and editors. This 36‐credit program provides students with individualized instruction that enhances writing and publication skills, enables students to develop a comprehensive professional portfolio of work, and prepares students to write in both new and traditional media. Program course‐work integrates theoretical, practical and creative foundations with professional practice skill development. Each course asks students to apply their knowledge and writing skills to cutting‐edge communication challenges. Students also gain an understanding of the various jobs in the field.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the Master of Arts in Professional Writing program will be able to:

  • Assess the theoretical principles that underlie rhetorical choices and decisions made in professional writing;
  • Develop and expand writing skills that are demanded in a variety of professional settings;
  • Build an awareness of audience, markets, and current standards of publishing professionalism;
  • Develop practical strategies for purposeful, effective communications that fit specific circumstances and client needs;
  • Write for publication and distribution in real professional contexts;
  • Work within a community of professional writers in an online format;
  • Produce a capstone project that develops a grasp of research methodology and critical thinking skills essential to the field.

Programs

Major

Courses

Professional Writing

  • PW 5020 - Editing and Publishing


    The course is designed to introduce students to the field of professional publishing and editing. Students will be exposed to industry standards and gain competency specifically geared towards individual career goals. Specific topics include: digital publishing, editing in the professions, independent publishing, and publishing industry trends and protocol. (5 credits)
  • PW 5400 - Writing for the Media and Public Relations


    This course focuses on understanding the basic concepts, skills, and practices of writing for the media and public relations. Communication protocols that involve the media and specific writing tasks such as writing for television, print, and radio are covered. Specific writing assignments may include articles, press releases, and scripts, media kits, personality profiles, speeches, and writing for public relation campaigns and media conferences. (5 credits)
  • PW 5500 - The New Media


    This course will introduce students to critical concepts and practical skills related to writing for those new media that have developed out of the use of digital computers, such as writing for the internet (online publications, blogs, email, chat, social networks, text messaging, etc.) and computer games. Image manipulation, software developments, desktop publishing tools, and instructional design concepts will also be covered in relation to actual professional writing tasks and opportunities. (5 credits)
  • PW 5600 - Business and Technical Communication


    The course is designed to cover the purposes and styles of business and technical writing and to offer students a variety of focused writing exercises structured around scenarios or actual work situations. Within the course students will learn how to write a wide assortment of business and technical documents ethically such as letters, memorandums, reports, proposals, cover letters, resumes, questionnaires, brochures, technical reports, FAQs, presentations, and/or manuals and technical documents that require technical explanations. (5 credits)
  • PW 5990 - Special Topics in Professional Writing


    Topics for this course will vary from term to term. Special topics of particular interest to professional writers will be explored within the context of student generated writing assignments. (5 credits)
  • PW 6005 - Creative Nonfiction


    In this course we will explore the genre(s) of Creative Nonfiction in which people write creatively about their own experiences, about the experiences of others, and about the world around them.  Typically Creative Nonfiction genres employ standard aspects of craft found in most fiction, but Creative Nonfiction includes autobiography and memoir, travel writing, research-based personal essays, and, more recently, blogs and websites.  We’ll read a number of examples of Creative Nonfiction, and then students will focus their efforts in this course on the writing of their own Creative Nonfiction narrative.  (5 credits)
  • PW 6950 - Capstone Portfolio One


    The first course in the Capstone process introduces students to the concept and practical use of digital platforms to maintain professional portfolios. Students examine digital platforms as a marketing tool that reflect individual professional interests and career goals. Specific focus in Capstone Portfolio One is given to the examination of brand identity, marketing trends in professional writing, and audience-centered design.  (3 credits) (This course is taken as pass/fail)
  • PW 6950 - Capstone Portfolio Two


    Capstone Portfolio Two is focused on the creation and realization of students’ digital platforms as professional writers. Building upon individual strengths and skills acquired in Capstone Portfolio One, attention is focused on creating and maintaining a professional digital-based presence that demonstrate versatility and understanding of professional design and content. (3 Credits) (This course is taken as pass/fail.)

Public Policy (MAPP)


Description

The New England College’s Master of Arts in Public Policy (MAPP) program prepares students for opportunities in both the public and private sector for positions in and out of government, public policy and advocacy groups or in any industry that an in‐depth knowledge of the policy process is desired. The MAPP curriculm focuses on the intersection between poilicy and politics by taking advantage of faculty who are scholar practitioners in the policy world. The work of our MAPP faculty is complemented by our Leadership Seminars which brings to campus, experts whose work seeks to advance public policy in a host of issue areas.

Program Outcomes

  • Collect, synthesize, and  analyze information to better understand contemporary public policy issues; 
  • Contribute to teams working on policy research and formulation;
  • Apply negotiation tools to collaboratively reach consensus and identification of common objectives in diverse populations with diverging interests;
  • Be familiar with the key governmental institutions that formulate and implement public policy;
  • Articulate the nuances of political processes at the local, state, and national levels, and how they influence the formulation and implementation of public policy;
  • Understand public budgeting and resource allocation;
  • Differentiate between various methods of conducting and assessing program evaluation;
  • Carry out applied research to support communicating effectively in the policy realm.

Programs

Major

Courses

Public Policy

  • PO 5330 - State and Local Government


    The late Speaker of the House, Thomas P. ‘Tip’ O’Neil is often quoted as having said all politics is local. In this course, students examine the roles state and local governments play in the American system of federalism. The course examines the relationship between and among localities, states and the federal government. Students will have the opportunity to focus on the various roles of state and local government from the ability to make laws, regulate behavior, impose taxes and provide for the common good. The limitations of government is also examined. Particular attention is given to policy issues like voting and voter registration, education, school finance, health care, law enforcement and tax and debt limitations. (4 credits)
  • PO 6020 - Public Policy Analysis


    This course will introduce the student to the policy lifecycle. It will build on knowledge gained through the program to add to the student’s toolset for policy formation, implementation and review. Participants will also discuss issues such as agenda setting and goals of the policy process. (4 credits)
  • PO 6030 - Economic Analysis


    This course is an analysis of economic phenomena (prices, taxation, market values) from the perspectives of economic institutions (government, markets) and the decisions that they make. Topics covered will include the role of government and markets in advancing the public good, effects and limitations of government economic policies, and analysis of the effects of economic decisions on the institution and the public. (4 credits)
  • PO 6040 - Research Methods


    This course will provide an overview of graduate level research in the Master of Arts in Public Policy program. Students will learn about the various methods of research in the discipline, research design, and proper formatting and writing of formal papers at the graduate level. Specific focus will be placed on topic development, developing a research outline, conducting a literature review, constructing an annotated bibliography, and proper citation styles. This course will provide all students the tools to conduct research and prepare graduate level writing in the discipline. (2 credits)
  • PO 6200 - Campaigns and Elections


    A study of the election process, including positioning of candidates, interaction with the media, campaign finance and law, party politics, and building a voter base of support. Students will manage a hypothetical campaign from its inception to a mock election. Guest presentations by successful candidates and campaign managers will be a central focus of the course. (4 credits)
  • PO 6220 - Governmental Policy Makers


    The United States Congress both constitutionally and pragmatically, plays an indispensable role in the formulation of Public Policy. This course will examine the way in which this complex institution fulfills its essential role. Among the issues the course will deal with are the role of committees, lobbyists, the executive branch, constituency groups, and the media, and the way these groups help shape policy in local, regional, and federal government. This course will also explore current issues and trends in local and regional government. It will use a spectrum of issues to give students an understanding of the purpose of mixed levels of government, the relationship between governing elites and the people from whom their authority is theoretically derived, the differences between the theory of government operation and its practice, and the utility and organization of government from the executive to the local level. This course will also examine the growing role of the Executive Branch, not only in implementing the policies enacted by Congress, but in setting the policy agenda for the nation. Institutional tensions between the Executive and Legislative branches will be studied and the wartime powers of the Presidency will be considered. The Judiciary will be studied in light of recent challenges to its independence and differing conceptions of the activism versus conservatism of the bench. The evolution of the confirmation process will also be studied. (4 credits)
  • PO 6300 - Class, Poverty, and Race in America


    A study of the persistent issues of class, poverty and race in America and how they compromise the pursuit of the American dream of equality and opportunity. The “War on Poverty,” The Civil Rights movement, welfare reform and educational inequalities will be examined. (4 credits)
  • PO 6310 - Public Finance and Budgeting


    Government intervention in the economy, the form of that intervention and the impact of governmental policy at local, state, and federal levels will be examined in this course. Students will focus their study on economic tools of analysis used in public finance and budgeting by the public sector. Public policies to address externalities, perverse incentives, public goods, social insurance, and the effects of taxes are among the topics examined in detail. (4 credits)
  • PO 6320 - Leadership and Negotiations


    The focus of this course is the interplay between effective leadership, the art of negotiation, and timely and effective decision-making. Apart from serving as marketing terms, each of the three concepts are critical to effective public policy making. The course examines their interplay within the context of public servants and their efforts to serve the public good. In addition to specific public policy, students will examine the role that perception plays in the public policy process. Ethics and power are important aspects of this course. (4 credits)
  • PO 6490 - Advanced Research in Public Policy


    The seminar is intended to be a teaching for students preparing to write completing the capstone in public policy. It provides some fundamental readings in policy analysis. The course supports students in developing their own research questions and research design by presenting their results and developing their interpretations in reference with the academic literature. (2 credits)
  • PO 6500 - Origins of American Democracy


    This course will investigate the intellectual and practical beginnings of democracy in America. It will analyze the bedrock documents that guide our government and examine the history of electoral politics in the U.S. (4 credits)
  • PO 6650 - Program Evaluation


    Program evaluation is a key component in the public policy process. Once a policy has been developed, operationalized and implemented, policy analysts must conduct program evaluation. Policy evaluation seeks to assess the design, implementation, outcomes, efficacy, and outcomes of a program. The evaluation works to identify both barriers to successful implementation as well as opportunities for improved outcomes. Students will focus on a variety of evaluative tools in this course. (4 credits)
  • PO 6975 - Capstone Project


    The Capstone project provides an integrative experience through the student’s efforts in developing an actual program or public policy. The students assume all components of completing the policy paper, from selecting the topic, preparing a research design and writing of the policy solutions. This capstone experience requires students to integrate principles, theories, and methods learned in courses required through their program. Students creatively analyze, synthesize, and evaluate learned knowledge in the project having a professional focus and communicate the results of the project effectively at a professional level. (4 credits)
  • PO 7050 - Environmental Politics and Policy


    Are we facing an unprecedented environmental crisis or are environmental problems exaggerated? Has political discourse helped to shape sound environmental policies in the public interest or mainly served as an arena for a battle of special interests? What has been the role of environmental organizations and other institutions in environmental politics? What environmental issues are most likely to receive more attention in political debate and how might this debate unfold? This course will examine these and other issues. (4 credits)